What do you miss about being LDS?


#1

This is a question for those of your who are Catholic converts from the Mormon faith. What, if anything, do you miss about the being LDS? It’s interesting, but when my family and I converted 37 years ago we left our different Protestant faiths without even looking back. Of course I was only 18 and not fully grounded in the teachings of the Church I had attended since childhood. Recently I have found myself remembering those days before my LDS conversion with fondness. Now so much of who I am is centered in LDS Church and it’s culture. To even consider leaving after these many years seems particularly wrenching and this time my family would not be coming with me. I realize I have much to explore, study, ponder and pray about, and I’m not sure how long the journey will be or even where it will take me. I have no animosity or ill-feeling toward the LDS Church. My search for answers started because of my own personal struggles. For the most part I have only felt love and support from my LDS friends and family. I can’t imagine leaving the Church without feeling like some integral part of my very being has been ripped out of me. However, I cannot deny that I feel God’s call to continue searching for answers in the Catholic Church.


#2

My knee-jerk reaction to your question was to say “I don’t miss anything.” But after a moment’s reflection, I realized that wasn’t true.

There are times when I look back with nostalgia on being part of the majority religion in Utah. I felt like I belonged. I also miss the temple, mainly because the one in SLC was beautiful and had a feeling of mystery to it.

When I was a Mormon in Utah, it was perfectly acceptable to make jokes about things such as “Mormon Red-Death Punch.” That was coined by a Mormon cartoonist, Calvin Grondahl. Once I was no longer a Mormon, it somehow became seen as an accusation rather than the fond humor that it had been before. Now my Mormon friend here in FL just looks aghast when I tease him the way we used to all tease each other in Utah. I don’t like the way that feels.

The other thing I miss are the plays, such as “Saturday’s Child” and the Manti Temple summer play (if they still have it.) Those made me feel, again, like I was part of something special.

There are a host of things that I do NOT miss, but I won’t go into them here. I don’t want to turn this into something that could be construed as “just another rant from a bitter ex-Mormon.” I may be “ex” and I may be utterly convinced that the Mormon church is false, but I am not bitter.

God bless you in your struggle to find your way. I have known many who no longer believed in the church but did not dare walk away because of the chaos it would cause within their circle of family and friends. It’s not an easy thing to do. I will keep you in my prayers.


#3

[quote=searcher] I realize I have much to explore, study, ponder and pray about, and I’m not sure how long the journey will be or even where it will take me. I have no animosity or ill-feeling toward the LDS Church. My search for answers started because of my own personal struggles. For the most part I have only felt love and support from my LDS friends and family. I can’t imagine leaving the Church without feeling like some integral part of my very being has been ripped out of me. However, I cannot deny that I feel God’s call to continue searching for answers in the Catholic Church.
[/quote]

Wow, your feelings are SO close to my own.

I joined the LDS chuch 24 years ago. I have a deep respect for the LDS church, and still defend it and probably always will, but there are just certain areas of the gospel that I have a hard time with and, like you, I cannot deny the feeling that my callings lie in the Catholic church.

What I will miss the most is the unity of the church. I grant you that there are aspects of the doctrine that no 2 Mormons will ever agree on (as you will find in any church), but the LDS church is more unified in fellowship than any church I have ever attended. If you ever have a problem, just call your home teachers and if they can’t help, they know who in the church to call that can, and will.

I will also greatly miss “Sunday School”, a practice I would dearly love to see the Catholic church adopt.

God Bless.


#4

LOL, I thought you were talking about LSD at first… :smiley:

I took LSD when I was in high school. I miss the false sense of enlightenment I used to get… :smiley:


#5

http://www.epinions.com/images/opti/8e/33/1054939-musicuk-resized200.jpg


#6

searcher and Jo’s Dad,

Bless you for being willing to follow the call to find truth. So many of us just stick with where we’re at because it’s what we’ve always been taught, or it’s where we’re comfortable. I commend you for searching! I will pray for both of you!

I am Catholic (always have been), but I have many LDS friends and I can tell you what I wish the Catholic church had that I see in the LDS church. I wish we had more “social activities”. I wish Catholics were as dedicated to church as LDS seem to be. I wish Catholics would tithe 10% like LDS do (I’m one who doesn’t as well).


#7

Actually, it may not be that hard to do. Talk to your parish preist about it, maybe set up Catechism classes after mass, 1 for children, 1 for teenagers and 1 for adults because when you think about it, that’s all Sunday school really is. :smiley:

The Home Teacher program is wonderful. It’s just 2 Church members, most frequently a husband and wife but sometimes singles get paired off (in which case it’s 2 men or 2 women) who have signed up for it first of all, they are then assigned a family who are also church members, and then once every month they come by and you fellowship and discuss that months home teaching lesson (which is printed in the church magazine), your home teachers will see if you need anything (like if you’ve fallen on hard times and need help buying groceries or if your ill and need something etc.) or if you end up in the hospital or something you call your home teachers and they’ll call the pastor etc.

Most home teachers have 2 or 3 families that they look in on every month but never more than they are able to actually handle. It’s a wonderful calling and really does really magnify that feeling of fellowship.

I remember when I was about 15 and one of the members had lost his job and his family was really having a rough go of it. Their home teacher got a bunch of us together, we went to a grocery store and filled up 2 big plastic laundry baskets with food and staples, left them on their front porch and wisked away :smiley: We were not going to knock or anything but they must have heard us drive up because we no sooner got in the car than the door opened ha ha. Busted :smiley: But it was great.

I’m rambling now, but it definatley is something I’ll miss. :slight_smile:

God Bless.


#8

You have a good point there. This is also something that I miss, although I kind of lumped it in with the “belonging” part earlier. As long as we were active Mormons, we could count on our fellow members to help us out in times of need, and we would do the same. Once we were no longer active, however, it was not the same. :frowning:


#9

[quote=searcher]This is a question for those of your who are Catholic converts from the Mormon faith. What, if anything, do you miss about the being LDS? It’s interesting, but when my family and I converted 37 years ago we left our different Protestant faiths without even looking back. Of course I was only 18 and not fully grounded in the teachings of the Church I had attended since childhood. Recently I have found myself remembering those days before my LDS conversion with fondness. Now so much of who I am is centered in LDS Church and it’s culture. To even consider leaving after these many years seems particularly wrenching and this time my family would not be coming with me. I realize I have much to explore, study, ponder and pray about, and I’m not sure how long the journey will be or even where it will take me. I have no animosity or ill-feeling toward the LDS Church. My search for answers started because of my own personal struggles. For the most part I have only felt love and support from my LDS friends and family. I can’t imagine leaving the Church without feeling like some integral part of my very being has been ripped out of me. However, I cannot deny that I feel God’s call to continue searching for answers in the Catholic Church.
[/quote]

Here’s my list:

*a better sense of community involvement, people notice if you miss church and will call to check on you
*people more willing to help each other
*a greater commitment to the faith by the average churchgoer
*better faith instruction for adults
*faithfulness to church teachings by local authorities

I can honestly say that I wish the LDS Church was true. I miss it very much. In terms of efficiency and results, it’s simply the best religious organization there is. But, I can’t deny my own logic, it’s based on untruth. In fact, a series of untruths.


#10

This is slightly off-thread, because I was never LDS, but I did grow up in Utah, and consider myself to be well read on LDS issues.

My family lived in Farmington, an LDS stronghold in Davis county (a stronghold within a stronghold).

What I miss is the high level of community involvement that the LDS Church had.

My scout troop, summer activities and soccer & baseball teams were all sponsored by the LDS Church.

Since we were one of only four gentile families in the entire neighborhood (in fact within several neighborhoods), our family spent time together on Mondays, when all my Mormon friends were at Family Home Evening.

I think both Catholics and Protestants could learn something from devoting a particular day for family events, and for being more involved in community actions.

What I do not miss is the xenophobic attitude many had toward my family (not all, but many) since we were Catholics.

Catholics could also take lessons from Mormons related to tithing and general assistance with Church activities.

Thanks for reading my comments,

Deacon Chris


#11

Now that you have become Catholic, imagine yourself going back to the LDS Church.

After a good reflection on this what would it be that you would then miss about the Catholic Church?


#12

I’m not Catholic nor have I ever been but I’d like to point out a couple things I admire about the Catholic Church:

  1. The beauty of the great cathedrals, the artwork and music, and the sense of awe and wonder one feels when attending mass; In the LDS meetinghouses I don’t think we are reverent enough and I wish people behaved more like the people I see in Catholic churches

  2. The depth of history in the Catholic Church

  3. The dedicated professional priesthood – because LDS have a part time priesthood sometimes they are not as well trained as they should be


#13

[quote=catholic-rcia]Now that you have become Catholic, imagine yourself going back to the LDS Church.

After a good reflection on this what would it be that you would then miss about the Catholic Church?
[/quote]

You know, I can’t imagine myself ever leaving the RCC, but if for any reason I ever did, I would still pray the Rosary and the Stations of the Cross.

God Bless


#14

[quote=Jo’s_Dad]You know, I can’t imagine myself ever leaving the RCC, but if for any reason I ever did, I would still pray the Rosary and the Stations of the Cross.

God Bless
[/quote]

Okay, I guess I don’t pay attention very well but I thought you were still LDS. :o I need to read posts more closely. :smiley:

Maggie


#15

Strangely enough I miss the music. No not the dirge like hyms that are sung waaaay tooo slow. But I miss the times where the right song at the right time just really lifted my spirits. During my lonely teens a off beat “Your not alone” would make me feelt beter. When I felt the need to reverance my creator a quick “How Great thou art” was amazing. I have yet to really jell with any of the catholic songs, but I think that is mainly from unfimiliarity with them. I do miss the hords of available priests as I have a garden project I could really use a old pick up truck and a elders quorum’s help with but we all have to make sacrifices in search of the truth.
I think that’s it for now. I was a very happy l.d.s. for 30 years it still seems a bit weird for me to be outside the church. I am still getting used to the idea that I am nolonger responsible for the salvation of a million ansesters. Did I mention I WILL NOT MISS geneology. I am not a real anything in the catholic church yet so I guess you would have to say I am officially between churches.


#16

[quote=Jodi]Strangely enough I miss the music. No not the dirge like hyms that are sung waaaay tooo slow. But I miss the times where the right song at the right time just really lifted my spirits. During my lonely teens a off beat “Your not alone” would make me feelt beter. When I felt the need to reverance my creator a quick “How Great thou art” was amazing. I have yet to really jell with any of the catholic songs, but I think that is mainly from unfimiliarity with them. I do miss the hords of available priests as I have a garden project I could really use a old pick up truck and a elders quorum’s help with but we all have to make sacrifices in search of the truth.
I think that’s it for now. I was a very happy l.d.s. for 30 years it still seems a bit weird for me to be outside the church. I am still getting used to the idea that I am nolonger responsible for the salvation of a million ansesters. Did I mention I WILL NOT MISS geneology. I am not a real anything in the catholic church yet so I guess you would have to say I am officially between churches.
[/quote]

Jodi,
It is nice to see you again! There are many wonderful Catholic songs. I am sure that as you become more familiar with them that you will “gel” more with them.

I am sure there are numerous Catholics who would be willing to lend you a hand and/or a truck. We really are nice people. :smiley:

You definitely ARE NOT between churches my friend! If you are planning on going through RCIA and becoming a member of the Catholic Church then you are a pre-catechumen. And if you have already filled out a registration card at the parish you attend, then you are an official parishioner as well.


#17

[quote=Casen]I’m not Catholic nor have I ever been but I’d like to point out a couple things I admire about the Catholic Church:

  1. The beauty of the great cathedrals, the artwork and music, and the sense of awe and wonder one feels when attending mass; In the LDS meetinghouses I don’t think we are reverent enough and I wish people behaved more like the people I see in Catholic churches

  2. The depth of history in the Catholic Church

  3. The dedicated professional priesthood – because LDS have a part time priesthood sometimes they are not as well trained as they should be
    [/quote]

Casen,

Thank you for those kind words.


#18

[quote=catholic-rcia]Now that you have become Catholic, imagine yourself going back to the LDS Church.

After a good reflection on this what would it be that you would then miss about the Catholic Church?
[/quote]

This one is easy.

The Eucharist
The Eucharist
The Eucharist


#19

This one is easy.

The Eucharist
The Eucharist
The Eucharist__________________
Peace,

Chirst’s presence!

You Bet!
God Bless You


#20

[quote=Jo’s_Dad]You know, I can’t imagine myself ever leaving the RCC, but if for any reason I ever did, I would still pray the Rosary and the Stations of the Cross.

God Bless
[/quote]

I’m curious, Jo’s dad. On your profile you list Protestant. At least one person on the forum thinks you are LDS. And you will still pray the Rosary and the Stations of the Cross. Which religion is this? Sorry if I sort of sound like “What’s my line?”


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