What do you think of Catholic women wearing the Islamic headscarf?

Hello,

I’ve read some blogs by Catholic (and Orthodox, Protestant, pagan, etc) women who’ve decided to wear a headscarf in the Islamic hijab style (which covers all the hair, the ears, and the neck) for various reasons. I’ve been curious about what sort of reactions the Catholic hijabis (hijab-wearers) have gotten from the Catholic community, particularly at Mass. Unfortunately, I haven’t been able to contact them.

What would you think of a lay Catholic woman who wore the hijab? What do you think your reaction would be? If you saw a woman wearing a hijab and a crucifix necklace, would you think that she was Catholic, or Orthodox, or just a Muslim wearing a crucifix?

Thanks,
Christine

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I think that it can be a very beautiful thing, provided that it’s not worn with the intention of showing off. Besides, catholic nuns wear a uniform that’s somewhat similar to an abaya, which is an islamic dress.

More importantly, I don’t think Islam invented the concept of a woman wearing a scarf on her head. Any woman can do it.

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I think the hijab is beautiful and some are very pretty and stylish. But
because its viewed as muslim religious headwear its better not to be
sending out a wrong message .

In the 60’s I lived in a country town with a large italian community, they all wore a normal type headscarf, and it didn’t bother anyone… no one really cares what another person wears providing they don’t enforce there ideas on everyone else…

I don’t care. Not a bit.

I don’t care either way. However, if they’re doing it to make themselves feel closer to God I think that’s lovely.

:thumbsup:

OP, if you want to wear it, go for it. If I were to wear a headcovering to Mass, it would probably be more hijab looking than a mantilla.

Christian women have traditionally dressed in a similar fashion, covering their hair while in public. There’s nothing wrong with wearing a scarf over one’s hair.

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Catholic women wearing a veil, head covering or scarf…fine. If they are deliberately aping the Islamic look for as you say “whatever reason” I have to wonder about their motive. Is it to shock? To stand with your Muslim sisters? Because it looks cool?

What’s the point? I’d have a different reaction depending on the why.

In a country that is founded on “from many ONE” any dress or mannerism that tends to isolate one into small and insular enclaves is somewhat off putting. I don’t think it’s a positive force overall.

Lisa

I agree with the above. The question betrays a total lack of historical knowledge by its asker, because women, all over the world, were wearing scarves in that manner for centuries before Islam was “invented”.
My Polish grandmother wore a scarf in that manner when I was a boy, and she wouldn’t have known what a Moslem woman looked like even if one came up and bit her!

Like this one?

http://web-images.chacha.com/virgin-mary/virgin-mary-jan-18-2012-200.jpg

**Islam is not just another religion. I would like to wear the headscarf too - I like feeling modestly covered, alot, around the head/hair shoulder area.

But: no encouragement of casual observors concluding that Islam is becoming more prevalent erroneously… because of non-Islamists wearing the scarf - is tolerable.

Islam is bent on destruction of western culture.**

:thumbsup:

I still don’t care. It’s none of my business. Period.

Hasn’t France outlawed the wearing of the hijab in public schools? To be honest, after 9/11 I became a little uneasy seeing women wearing Muslim scarves; I think I am getting over it now.

Honestly I’ve never seen a full blown hijab. but I attend the Latin mass in my city from time to time and see women come close, as the women at these mass cover their head. I would say it is probably a reation to the over sexed and loose morality that has become our culture in just the last 5 years. going the opposite way.

Growing up in the eastern US, we wore scarves in the winter mostly or when it was cold. We called them “babushkas”.

We (Catholics) Christianize cultures. :slight_smile:

My mom made me wear a babushka outdoors, especially if it was windy (prevented earaches, in her opinion). My gramma made me a bunch of them, so I could match my dresses for church :smiley:

Hi Christine,

I admire those who out of love for God wears a hijab-style headcovering which is described in the Early Church Fathers as the expectation for faithful Catholic Christian single ladies & married women both in & outside of Church. It’s described in such detail in the Fathers the way of modest dress that was acceptible not just in one country, but all over the world where Christians were.

I did wear hijab-style headcovering for about 8 days in a row. I loved how connected I felt with our ancestors in Christ and to God for obeying. 1 Cor. 11 speaks briefly that a woman wearing long hair is following natural law & wearing a separate cloth headcovering is acceptance of divine law. St. John Chrysostom’s homily on 1 Cor. 11 is very detailed & clear and consistent with all the other Fathers on the subject.

If I were more brave, I’d wear it at all times outside of the home as the early Church so clearly & consistently taught. I do wear headcovering to Mass though, I can no longer imagine going up to receive Jesus Christ our God in the Eucharist without my head fully covered. I know that the “sin” has been removed for those women who choose not to cover at Mass, but I haven’t found anything that actually says it’s acceptible to break the ancient tradition or that claims it is no longer part of divine law as the early Church Fathers speak so clearly. In other words I can’t find any reason Not to cover. May God have mercy on my fear to be different and obey in this matter.

Are you thinking of covering? If so, I want encourage you!!! This is a pre-Islamic Christian practice & a pre-Christian Jewish practice which was adopted by Islam.

Headscarves are beautiful, and I some of my Catholic female friends do like to try them out occasionally.

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