What Does Anglican Church of North America say about Contraception?


#1

I would love to know what the Anglican Church of North America says about contracetion. I went on their website but couldn't find anything. I know their position on homosexuality and many other social issues.

Also, as a side note, are they opposed to female priests? I thought they were but would like to get a confirmation on this.


#2

[quote="jinc1019, post:1, topic:275411"]
I would love to know what the Anglican Church of North America says about contracetion. I went on their website but couldn't find anything. I know their position on homosexuality and many other social issues.

Also, as a side note, are they opposed to female priests? I thought they were but would like to get a confirmation on this.

[/quote]

As to your second question, the constitution and canons as adopted in 1009 state:

anglicanchurch.net/media/acna_constitution_and_canons_june_2009.pdf

ARTICLE VIII: THE LIMITS OF PROVINCIAL AUTHORITY

  1. The member dioceses, clusters or networks (whether regional or affinity-based) and those dioceses banded together as jurisdictions shall each retain all authority they do not yield to the Province by their own consent. The powers not delegated to the Province by this constitution nor prohibited by this Constitution to these dioceses or jurisdictions, are reserved to these dioceses or jurisdictions respectively.

  2. The Province shall make no canon abridging the authority of any member dioceses, clusters or networks (whether regional or affinity-based) and those dioceses banded together as jurisdictions with respect to its practice regarding the ordination of women to the diaconate or presbyterate.


#3

Thanks for the post…I take it you are not sure of their position on contraception? I can’t find anything on it.


#4

I have no reason to assume that it is anything different than the rest of the anglican communion... that they accept the sinful use of artificial birth control.


#5

Yeah.at least I can’t find anything definite that is not a blog analysis (though I admit that I have not read through the entire Canons yet). I suspect however, that ACNA will follow the practice as outlined in the Lambeth Conference of 1920


#6

You can’t make any assumptions because they operate completely differently…they don’t accept many of the teachings of many Anglican branches, especially Episcopalians.


#7

The women’s ordination issue is a pretty good philosophical indicator on which way they will lean on contraception though.

The women’s ordination movement hinges on the unexamined assumption that humans are spiritual creatures trapped in bodies that are irrelevant in terms of who the person is and what they are made to be.

Anyone with that mindset is not for a second going to believe that contraception could have negative spiritual effects.

Philosophy drives doctrinal teaching in such matters.


#8

The ACNA allows individual dioceses to determine if they will ordain women as deacons and priests. Women bishops are prohibited completely.


#9

[quote="ltwin, post:8, topic:275411"]
The ACNA allows individual dioceses to determine if they will ordain women as deacons and priests. Women bishops are prohibited completely.

[/quote]

Mmmm...what it has done with these provisional Constitution and Canons is to specify that it won't interfere with the current practice of its member dioceses, and institutions ministry partners in regards to the issue of the ordination of women. What the canons do not say (I believe) is whether the ministry of said women (if any) will be accepted or allowed Province-wide. Remember, that unlike earlier Continuing Anglican ecclesial bodies, ACNA is not primarily composed of Evangelicals or Anglo-Catholics, but a mixture of both, and there are a number of Anglican bodies that are part of ACNA who see the ordained ministry of women as a living out of the fullness of the baptismal covenant...the "in Christ there is no East or West, male or female, Greek or Jew, master or slave" (loose paraphrase here), but then they tend to have a "low" doctrine of Church and Sacrament,


#10

Article VIII: The Limits of Provincial Authority in the Constitution adopted June 2009:

  1. The member dioceses, clusters or networks (whether regional or affinity-based) and those dioceses banded together as jurisdictions shall each retain all authority they do not yield to the Province by their own consent. The powers not delegated to the Province by this constitution nor prohibited by this Constitution to these dioceses or jurisdictions, are reserved to these dioceses or jurisdictions respectively.
  1. The Province shall make no canon abridging the authority of any member dioceses, clusters or networks (whether regional or affinity-based) and those dioceses banded together as jurisdictions with respect to its practice regarding the ordination of women to the diaconate or presbyterate.

And this language is preserved in the revised CandC’s that will be presented to the next Provincial Assembly. What I have read about this provision is that it means that if a diocese wants to enact canons allowing the ordination of women as deacons or priests they can. On the other hand, if they want to enact canons which forbid those ordinations they can as well. The province cannot interfere. Notice that there is no mention of pre-existing entities here. So this would seem to apply to any subsequent dioceses that are created or join ACNA. One of the criteria for being a bishop is that one “Be a male Presbyter at least 35 years old” according to Title III Canon 8 Section 3.

In regards to its teaching on contraception, the relevant canon is Title II Canon 8. It does not mention contraception, but it does deal with the sanctity of life:

Section 3 -
God, and not man, is the creator of human life. The unjustified taking of life is sinful. Therefore, all members and clergy are called to promote and respect the sanctity of every human life from conception to natural death.

You can read the ACNA Constitution and Canons here.


#11

[quote="manualman, post:7, topic:275411"]
T
The women's ordination movement hinges on the unexamined assumption that humans are spiritual creatures trapped in bodies that are irrelevant in terms of who the person is and what they are made to be.

[/quote]

Sounds gnostic to me.


#12

[quote="Credo_ergo_sum, post:11, topic:275411"]
Sounds gnostic to me.

[/quote]

nothing is new under the sun.


#13

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#14

And with shades of Manicheanism, Docetism, and maybe Montanism mayhaps?


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