What does the Vatican think of biological psychiatry?


#1

What is the Vatican’s official view or sentiments about biological psychiatry? I know they have expressed in certain instances an appreciation for psychoanalysis(which is psychological theory and treatment very different than biological psychiatry). And in a somewhat recent statement of “World Day of the Sick” they said many things about the role of many factors in the causes to mental illness and they sounded fairly psychoanalytic and didn’t mention “biological” causes at all. So I’m curious what the Vatican thinks of biological psychiatry. I’ve spoken to enough psychoanalysts to know that biological psychiatry is very different from psychoanalysis.

What does the Vatican really think of biological psychiatry? Please if you could go into things in some detail I would appreciate it but only if you truly know the answer.

Peace


#2

I can’t go into any detail but I am surprised that they have spoken highly of psychoanalysis:confused:


#3

Attributing the causes to family experiences especially in childhood has support from psychoanalysis I believe. I feel that the Vatican holds the family and any “disequilibrium” in the family as a prime cause of mental illness. I feel that’s fairly analytic and something a competent psychoanalyst would agree with.

A large way I think of analysis is that analysts believe that the cause to illness has much to do with family and life experiences and the things that happen to us. And I thought that is what was said in the “World Day of the Sick”.

So that’s what I say when I thought they’re "more analytic. In some writings they seem to hold that the family is the issue and it’s psychological and social rather than genetic or “biological”.

I could be wrong though. That was at least my association that they’re more analytic than biological.

But I would be curious to know the answer to my question: their whole real view of biological psychiatry.


#4

I guess what I was saying is that it’s more analytic to attribute things to life experiences.

I think a Pope once remarked that psychoanalysis was an advancement in the understanding of the human psyche. But I’m not totally sure. You would have to look that up on the Vatican website.


#5

I’m sorry but I broke my own rules. I wrote without knowing the topic enough.
I wrote several responses to this which were out of anxiety. The topic of psychiatry makes me feel uncomfortable.

So I will just leave things at this: please if you know the Vatican’s view of biological psychiatry well please do answer. I won’t write any more regarding analysis and I should have just asked the question rather than stated anything analytic or in reference to psychoanalysis.

Thank you


#6

Not a subject on Catholic tradition

CLOSED


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