What ever happenned to the Traditional Nun with the Ruler?


#1

OK, maybe I don’t my knuckles slapped - well this minute - ask me in an hour - but lately it seems that what we have is Nuns, Behaving Badly.

I know there are good Nuns out there who chose celibacy/chastity for the sake of the Kingdom and we never here of them causing trouble.

But, in the past week, we have news that the Sister at the top of CHA was still willing to support Obama’s Healthcare Plan with abortion funding in it even after the USCCB asked her not to. What happenned to basic catechesis, thou shalt not kill, obedience to the bishop?

We had a nun in Arizona self-excommunicate by counseling a patient to have an abortion.

Can someone please give some feedback here? I do not understand this behavior.

And I will say this again - I do truly believe that most Nuns out there are still traditional and good and devout and pious and have given themselves in such a way as to have done great service.


#2

Hi Joandark...
I know this is such a simple response...but I believe the most we can do for our faithful who seem to go astray with their voting rights...and do not "choose life" first as God Our Father created it all...perfect I might add...all we can do is set an example...and also pray for them...
never give up...There are "missionaries" out there who are opening doors and the eyes of young women who are pregnant and confused and scared...and they help them through education of the miracle of birth and usually they choose to carry the babies to full term...yes, some turn to adoption afterwards, but that is a saved life and a wanted life...Pray for them dear friend...
I, too, feel so confused when I see political bumper stickers on folks cars...who are prominent Catholics voting for candidates who are NOT for Life...and I just wonder how they can deal with the issue of supporting a candidate of the "death culture". I am a grandma...and soon I fear...our lives could be disposable, also, once we are deemed old and taking up space...
God reminds us that He never created anything that was inferior as far as human beings are concerned...He did give us all free will to chose...and hopefully more people will learn to choose "Life" and truly care for all God's children one day again...Pray...


#3

http://i66.photobucket.com/albums/h244/corona_stellarum/Smilies/nun_slapping_ruler_hg_clr-1.gif


#4

[quote="Shoshana, post:3, topic:202618"]
http://i66.photobucket.com/albums/h244/corona_stellarum/Smilies/nun_slapping_ruler_hg_clr-1.gif

[/quote]

That is absolutely great - I guess what I wonder - is why does it seem like the friars/monks are staying more traditional while the religious women are becoming doctrinally-challenged.


#5

[quote="joandarc2008, post:4, topic:202618"]
That is absolutely great - I guess what I wonder - is why does it seem like the friars/monks are staying more traditional while the religious women are becoming doctrinally-challenged.

[/quote]

That's not just happening in the religious orders. I read in Political Science that women, particularly single women, are generally more left-leaning than men and support the Democratic Party. That Party tends to support feminism, an increased secularization of society, and the "right" to abortion, homosexual marriage or civil unions, etc. This voting trend reminds me of how Eve sinned first, and then Adam. But in the New Testament, Paul points to Adam as bearing the greatest guilt (1 Cor. 15:22, Rom. 5:12), because as the first man, he was the head of his household and the head of the human race. Eve may have sinned first, but Adam receives the greatest scriptural criticism. Men and women alike, of course, will be judged for their deeds, and there is no greater blessing than the woman who does what God wills (Sirach 26:15). The Virgin Mary is the ultimate example of this (Song of Songs 6:8-10, Luke 1:42, Rev. 11:19-12:1). Death through Eve, life through Mary. Praise God for all faithful Christian women! They are the absolutely essential bulwark of the faith, on which we all rely. Praise God!


#6

[quote="joandarc2008, post:4, topic:202618"]
I guess what I wonder - is why does it seem like the friars/monks are staying more traditional while the religious women are becoming doctrinally-challenged.

[/quote]

Maybe there isn't any difference between the two? After all, in the US, there are 10x as many religious sisters as religious brothers. So if the same percentage of sisters and brothers are doctrinally challenged, you are much more likely to hear about the erring sister, because there are 10x as many sisters.


#7

[quote="Dale_M, post:6, topic:202618"]
Maybe there isn't any difference between the two? After all, in the US, there are 10x as many religious sisters as religious brothers. So if the same percentage of sisters and brothers are doctrinally challenged, you are much more likely to hear about the erring sister, because there are 10x as many sisters.

[/quote]

That is something I never thought of.


#8

[quote="joandarc2008, post:1, topic:202618"]
OK, maybe I don't my knuckles slapped - well this minute - ask me in an hour - but lately it seems that what we have is Nuns, Behaving Badly.

I know there are good Nuns out there who chose celibacy/chastity for the sake of the Kingdom and we never here of them causing trouble.

But, in the past week, we have news that the Sister at the top of CHA was still willing to support Obama's Healthcare Plan with abortion funding in it even after the USCCB asked her not to. What happenned to basic catechesis, thou shalt not kill, obedience to the bishop?

We had a nun in Arizona self-excommunicate by counseling a patient to have an abortion.

Can someone please give some feedback here? I do not understand this behavior.

And I will say this again - I do truly believe that most Nuns out there are still traditional and good and devout and pious and have given themselves in such a way as to have done great service.

[/quote]

The filthy liberals took her. Thats who!:D


#9

[quote="CatholicGuy22, post:8, topic:202618"]
The filthy liberals took her. Thats who!:D

[/quote]







Alright young man, come to my office...RIGHT NOW!!!!

http://i66.photobucket.com/albums/h244/corona_stellarum/Smilies/nun_slapping_ruler_hg_clr-1.gif


#10

[quote="Shoshana, post:9, topic:202618"]




Alright young man, come to my office...RIGHT NOW!!!!

http://i66.photobucket.com/albums/h244/corona_stellarum/Smilies/nun_slapping_ruler_hg_clr-1.gif

[/quote]

No. :P jumps out of window and lands ninja-style

Seriously though, don't you think there's a fine difference between a regular nun with a basic grasp of Catholic social stances and the stereotypical fanatic who hits you for chewing gum on campus, for the the length of your skirt (girls)/hair (guys), and for reading non-religious books? :shrug:


#11

[quote="Lost_Wanderer, post:10, topic:202618"]
No. :P jumps out of window and lands ninja-style

Seriously though, don't you think there's a fine difference between a regular nun with a basic grasp of Catholic social stances and the stereotypical fanatic who hits you for chewing gum on campus, for the the length of your skirt (girls)/hair (guys), and for reading non-religious books? :shrug:

[/quote]

No for some reason I only have this picture of Kenneth Braunaugh playing Hamlet grabbing his female co-star and yelling get thee to nunnery. It is almost as if something weird happens and there are very few that ever learn to live properly in the non-cloistered society without becoming liberals. Or atleast that is becoming the 21st century stereotype.


#12

[quote="joandarc2008, post:11, topic:202618"]
No for some reason I only have this picture of Kenneth Braunaugh playing Hamlet grabbing his female co-star and yelling get thee to nunnery. It is almost as if something weird happens and there are very few that ever learn to live properly in the non-cloistered society without becoming liberals. Or atleast that is becoming the 21st century stereotype.

[/quote]

Define "liberal". I myself, as a writer, have many characters that aren't modest of dress, have rebellious attitudes, and all painted in a positive light. I have no qualms in poking fun at old-fashioned types (including the nun-with-a-ruler as well as the fundamentalist ranter).

However, I strongly oppose abortion, think the gay marriage agenda is a waste of time, and do not approve of supplanting one religion over another for the sake of political correctness.

Surely a nun could follow a similar path. It just so happens they have more sexual purity. :shrug:


#13

[quote="Lost_Wanderer, post:12, topic:202618"]
Define "liberal". I myself, as a writer, have many characters that aren't modest of dress, have rebellious attitudes, and all painted in a positive light. I have no qualms in poking fun at old-fashioned types (including the nun-with-a-ruler as well as the fundamentalist ranter).

However, I strongly oppose abortion, think the gay marriage agenda is a waste of time, and do not approve of supplanting one religion over another for the sake of political correctness.

Surely a nun could follow a similar path. It just so happens they have more sexual purity. :shrug:

[/quote]

Okay, completely honest here, the similarities with me are striking.

I too am a writer who is a big supporter of Vatican II, CITH, and who wants to modernize Mass music.

However, I too am ultra pro-life, oppose gay marriage, believe in the infallibility of the Church and have no qualms believing in any defined Church dogma, and do not approve of supplanting one religion over another for the sake of political correctness.

The similarities are kind of bizarre. Maybe it's a writer thing. :shrug:


#14

[quote="Lost_Wanderer, post:12, topic:202618"]
Define "liberal". I myself, as a writer, have many characters that aren't modest of dress, have rebellious attitudes, and all painted in a positive light. I have no qualms in poking fun at old-fashioned types (including the nun-with-a-ruler as well as the fundamentalist ranter).

However, I strongly oppose abortion, think the gay marriage agenda is a waste of time, and do not approve of supplanting one religion over another for the sake of political correctness.

Surely a nun could follow a similar path. It just so happens they have more sexual purity. :shrug:

[/quote]

OK maybe liberal isn't the right word then. Liberal when we use it in the religious sense does not mean the same thing as when we use it in the secular sense. Usually when we apply liberal in the secular sense we are talking about values that are in contrast with Dogmas, Doctrines, and Traditions of the Catholic Church. I would say when we talk about liberal in a religious sense we may be talking about things that are matters of taste such as music, etc such as what you and Marc Anthony have mentioned which are really good points.

I am speaking of the kind of liberal that leads to apostasy or heresy such as anti-life issues or being pro-ordination of women. I don't know how to define that better so anyone else got any ideas?


#15

[quote="Marc_Anthony, post:13, topic:202618"]
The similarities are kind of bizarre. Maybe it's a writer thing. :shrug:

[/quote]

You might not be far off. I've seen plenty of conservative writers/artists (Catholic and non-Catholic alike) who neither fit the label Puritan tyrant or Catholic prude. However, they oppose all the things we have listed, all with the same line of reasoning.

Maybe it's because we're more in tune with the real world or something? :shrug:


#16

[quote="joandarc2008, post:14, topic:202618"]
I am speaking of the kind of liberal that leads to apostasy or heresy such as anti-life issues or being pro-ordination of women. I don't know how to define that better so anyone else got any ideas?

[/quote]

Um, actually if you read your own post, it's pointing to the more secular definition of the word "liberal." :o Things such as anti-life issues and pro-ordination of women are movements that spawned after the latest wave of feminism (or what I'd like to call feminazism :rolleyes:).


#17

[quote="Lost_Wanderer, post:15, topic:202618"]
You might not be far off. I've seen plenty of conservative writers/artists (Catholic and non-Catholic alike) who neither fit the label Puritan tyrant or Catholic prude. However, they oppose all the things we have listed, all with the same line of reasoning.

Maybe it's because we're more in tune with the real world or something? :shrug:

[/quote]

I don't know.

I DO know that writers are generally thought of as liberal (as are University Professors, which, though it's a bit more complex than this, I desire to be eventually as well *). Maybe we're being influenced by the liberality of our peer writers?

Not necessarily a bad thing, as long as we keep Catholic dogma faithfully.*


#18

[quote="Marc_Anthony, post:17, topic:202618"]
I DO know that writers are generally thought of as liberal (as are University Professors, which, though it's a bit more complex than this, I desire to be eventually as well *). Maybe we're being influenced by the liberality of our peer writers?

Not necessarily a bad thing, as long as we keep Catholic dogma faithfully.*

I actually welcome that liberality, especially since the human imagination is supposed to be a free thing in the first place. Even Tolkien probably went against the norm by adopting pagan English influences and Scandinavian mythology for his fiction instead of sticking to strictly Catholic literature. The same could even be said of Dante Alighieri.

[/quote]


closed #19

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