What happens after a pope dies?


#1

I’m new to catholicism and well, pope john paul II was in charge from before I was born so what happens after the death of a pope?


#2

We get a new Pope.:stuck_out_tongue:

Sorry, couldn’t help it.

newadvent.org/cathen/04192a.htm


#3

All the Cardinals in the world under the age of 75 will meet in Rome for a meeting called a conclave, which is held in the Sistine chapel. They will vote for a new Pope. Each day after the voting, smoke rises from the chimney of the chapel. If no Pope was elected, wet straw is added to the fire to turn the smoke black. If a Pope is elected the smoke is white. So the world knows each day what has happened.

Peace,
Linda


#4

What’s the official way we get a new pope though??? Is there already a successor or are they picked after? Is it a council or a vote???


#5

oh ok…thanks!!


#6

[quote=sarcophagus]What’s the official way we get a new pope though??? Is there already a successor or are they picked after? Is it a council or a vote???
[/quote]

I JUST posted a link after my smart aleck remark.


#7

The deceased pope is given a large funeral and there is a period of mourning. JP II revised Canon Law, and so I’m not too sure if there have been any significant changes in the process of electing a new pope.

There are cardinals designated to convene a meeting called a conclave, at which a new pope is elected. The cardinals are the bishops of the Church who are designated electors of the new pope. They remain electors until they reach the age of 75, I believe. I also think, generally, that the next pope will be elected from these cardinals, although they may be able to elect anyone pope. The pope-elect must accept or reject the election. There is not supposed to be any “campaigning” amongst the cardinals.

The rest of the details you should learn by observation. It is an interesting process steeped in traditions. There are various rumors about whether liberals will try to block the election of a non-liberal cardinal.


#8

EWTN Mini-Site

Pretty interesting information.


#9

Here is a helpful website:

catholic-pages.com/pope/election.asp


#10

Church could also split if there is enough disagreement over who has been elected the next Pope. If he’s too conservative, the liberals will have a cow. If he’s too liberal, prepare for a rash of SSPX conversions.

At this point in history, I believe the Church needs a Pope who is both a good diplomat and a good administrator. John Paul II was an exceptional Pope. I don’t think we’ll be seeing one of his caliber anytime soon, but I could be wrong.


#11

[quote=LindaS]All the Cardinals in the world under the age of 75 will meet in Rome for a meeting called a conclave, which is held in the Sistine chapel. They will vote for a new Pope. Each day after the voting, smoke rises from the chimney of the chapel. If no Pope was elected, wet straw is added to the fire to turn the smoke black. If a Pope is elected the smoke is white. So the world knows each day what has happened.

Peace,
Linda
[/quote]

The cutoff for being a cardinal elector is age 80.


#12

[quote=psalm90]… The cardinals are the bishops of the Church who are designated electors of the new pope. …
[/quote]

hence, the title “Prince(s) of the Church” given to them. :cool:


#13

The College of Cardinals pick the next Pope by majority vote. Historically they have selected someone present among them but they are not required top do so. They can pick anyone who is a Bishop or higher – originally, they could have picked anyone who was ordained (meaning that a regular priest down the block could have been picked to be the next Pope) but that was changed by the current Pope to Bishop or higher.


#14

[quote=Sir Knight]The College of Cardinals pick the next Pope by majority vote.
[/quote]

At first it is 2/3 majority vote.

After 30 unsuccessful elections, it goes down to a simple majority vote (50% + 1).


#15

Has anyone ever wondered why the cutoff age was set to 80? Why would you exclude men who have much more time and experience in the tradition …

Oops, just answered my own question.


#16

[quote=gelsbern]Has anyone ever wondered why the cutoff age was set to 80? Why would you exclude men who have much more time and experience in the tradition …

Oops, just answered my own question.
[/quote]

I’m amazed you would adopt this opinion. Lots of the over 80’s ***could ***be regarded as quite liberal by people of your view, due to the timing of their ordination, exposure to Vatican II, etc. They can elect anyone, including those over 80. In fact, given that the Holy Father has reigned for such a long time, I look for them to elect a fairly elderly man, though I pray that there is no cause for an election any time soon.

And don’t look now, but your agenda is showing.


#17

[quote=sarcophagus]I’m new to catholicism and well, pope john paul II was in charge from before I was born so what happens after the death of a pope?
[/quote]

s–

I am sorry; but, I do not know the exact process.

However, I do know, in general, that there is an “election”.

In short, the remaining leaders of the Church get together and decide who the next Pope is.

Remember, however, that the Church is guided by the Holy Spirit, and therefore this is not a normal “election” process such as that seen in the USA. Rather, it is a process by which humans try to open themselves to knowledge of the will of God and make the best choice.

See the following reference from the Vatican’s website for some details…

vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/apost_constitutions/documents/hf_jp-ii_apc_22021996_universi-dominici-gregis_en.html

ON THE VACANCY
OF THE APOSTOLIC SEE
AND THE ELECTION
OF THE ROMAN PONTIFF

HTH.

May Christ, our Lord, God, and Savior, be with you always,

–Mark


#18

[quote=4 marks]Church could also split if there is enough disagreement over who has been elected the next Pope.
[/quote]

Is there reallya chance of this happening?


#19

If I’m not mistaken, JPII changed it to 50%+1 from the 1st vote… Any Cardinal <80 yrs old votes.
None are permitted to divulge anything that went on in the Conclave under excommunication…unless a criminal event took place like a murder…God forbid.


#20

There was an exhibit of papal art traveling the US last year

I saw it in San Diego…it was very nice

One of the items on display was a small hammer.
The accompanying text said that traditionally if the chamberlain went to wake the Pope in the morning and he didn’t respond than he was to hit the Pope on the head with the hammer to try and rouse him. If the Pope was dead, then he was to take the Pope’s ring and break it with the hammer to symbolize the end of his riegn.

One of the people I saw the exhibit with observed that, given the Pope’s ill heath it was a smart move to send that hammer out of the Vatican.

You don’t want to get whacked on the head too often by over zealous chamberlains.


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