What happens if a person who has not confessed mortal sin takes communion?


#1

What if someone has not confessed mortal sin, but takes communion anyway? Are there consequences, or is it just invalid? Perhaps the precsence of Jesus in *that part *of the body and/or blood which is about to be received by that person exit’s the communion, making it simply just bread and wine so Jesus’ pureness will not enter them when it’s not suppose to?


#2

Those who receive communion worthily, are brought closer to salvation. Those who receive unworthily, bring themselves closer to condemnation.


#3

[quote=PMV]What if someone has not confessed mortal sin, but takes communion anyway? Are there consequences, or is it just invalid? Perhaps the precsence of Jesus in *that part *of the body and/or blood which is about to be received by that person exit’s the communion, making it simply just bread and wine so Jesus’ pureness will not enter them when it’s not suppose to?

[/quote]

They are committing sacrilege, and adding yet another mortal sin to their soul.

Their communion is valid, but they have received Jesus into their dead soul.

If they repent and go to confession, they must confess this sin as well as all their other mortal sins.


#4

no action or belief (or lack of it) on the part of the communicant changes the effects of the sacrament which are confered by the action of the priest, who acts in the person of Jesus Christ who confects the sacrament through the Holy Spirit. The sacrament received is fully Jesus, Body, Blood soul and divinity, and received by a person in a state of grace intensifies and comletes that grace. received by a person in a state of mortal sin is a sacrilege and adds a further sin. If it were not Christ, no sacrilege would occur.


#5

[quote=PMV]What if someone has not confessed mortal sin, but takes communion anyway? Are there consequences, or is it just invalid?
[/quote]

This teaching of the Church is based on I Cor. 11:27-30. And in light of this Scripture, the consequences of receiving “unworthily” are dire enough that when a Bishop speaks out against pro-abortion politicians receiving the Eucharist, he is acting in the spiritual interest of those individuals more so than trying to “punish” them by “depriving” them of the Eucharist.


#6

[quote=PMV]What if someone has not confessed mortal sin, but takes communion anyway? Are there consequences, or is it just invalid? Perhaps the precsence of Jesus in *that part *of the body and/or blood which is about to be received by that person exit’s the communion, making it simply just bread and wine so Jesus’ pureness will not enter them when it’s not suppose to?

[/quote]

== It doesn’t affect the Consecration at all.
And we are not talking about magic either. :slight_smile:

If the communicant has not confessed , but thinks he or she had - this is not the same as communicating in order to commit a sin: it is not the material act of communicating that matters so much as the motive, and the attitude, with which one does so. ==


#7

It depends too if the person is capabale of recieving the sacrament of reconciliation. I don’t think the same penality applies if some one is generally home-bound due to illness and lack of transportation over a period of time.


#8

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