What happens in this instance?

Anyone knows how to explain this?

Scenario

  1. A sin of grave matter is committed, for example, adultery, murder, birth control, etc.
    but in God’s judgement
  2. the person does not have full consent of the will and/or
  3. does not have full knowledge.

So in God’s eyes, they are not guilty of a mortal sin.

Is a sin committed in these instances at all?
Is there temporal punishment for it?
Are they guilty of anything?
If they were led there by vincible ignorance, would they be guilty of both vincible ignorance and the mortal sin?

Thanks!

Correct.

Is a sin committed in these instances at all?

We cannot say. Knowledge and consent may be partial and thus sin still exist.
Also it will depend on what the grave matter is.

Is there temporal punishment for it?

When we do not live in accordance with God’s will - there are consequences.

Are they guilty of anything?

Again - it depends on many factors. Best to discuss the matter with their confessor.

If they were led there by vincible ignorance, would they be guilty of both vincible ignorance and the mortal sin?

Read THIS from the Catechism…It should help.

Thanks!

You are welcome

Peace
James

If you did not choose for it to happen, I don’t think it would be considered a mortal sin. Someone who is violated should not have to pay the consequences if they did not choose for it to happen to them.

“Full knowledge” is something that confuses me myself.

In the end, I think the best thing to do is to pray and if you’re not sure if it is a sin, without going into too much detail, at confession tell your priest that you’re not sure if it is a mortal sin but _______. This way you’re not confessing surely that you are guilty of something, but you aren’t withholding it either.

Full knowledge means nothing more than you know that something is a sin.

From the Catechism…
1859 Mortal sin requires full knowledge and complete consent. It presupposes knowledge of the sinful character of the act, of its opposition to God’s law. It also implies a consent sufficiently deliberate to be a personal choice. Feigned ignorance and hardness of heart do not diminish, but rather increase, the voluntary character of a sin.

In the end, I think the best thing to do is to pray and if you’re not sure if it is a sin, without going into too much detail, at confession tell your priest that you’re not sure if it is a mortal sin but _______. This way you’re not confessing surely that you are guilty of something, but you aren’t withholding it either.

Good advice.
Our confessors are a wonderful resource.

Peace
James

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