What Horror Movies Are Really About

From what I read in, “Monster From The Id,” horror movies are supposed to represent the horrifying consequences of turning against the natural order, which of course, God has established. So, the horror is ended by returning to the natural order. Frankenstein, for example, represents the ordinary people who were stirred up by the revolutionary ideas of the 18th Century. Dracula represents a man infected with syphillis, going around seducing women and giving them that dreaded disease (prior to the 20th Century, syphillis lead to a very slow and agonizing death), which was carried in “the blood.” “Monsters From The Id,” circa 1950, starring Leslie Neilson, is about heading away from traditional sexual values and into the sexual revolution. All that passion, will stir up scary monsters from “the id,” that are impossible to control, regardless of how advanced your technology and science are and it always seems to lead to death.

Jam 1:13 Let no one say when he is tempted, “I am tempted by God”; for God cannot be tempted with evil and he himself tempts no one;
Jam 1:14 but each person is tempted when he is lured and enticed by his own desire.
Jam 1:15 Then desire when it has conceived gives birth to sin; and sin when it is full-grown brings forth death. (RSV)

blueletterbible.org/tools/printerFriendly.cfm?b=Jam&c=1&t=RSV&x=8&y=13

The Leslie Nielsen movie is actually called, “Forbidden Planet.”

Yes, and I’m not sure how it’s about untraditional sex. It’s science fiction more than horror, isn’t it? It’s extrapolative of knowledge and technology. There’s only a little kissing, which seems to have little to do with the plot, except that it brings out Morbius’ fear that his daughter has grown up.

Horror had a message when the unnatural thing was finally destroyed by something natural and un-cold - fire or sunlight, for example. But I’ve seen a Jack Nicholson movie, ‘Wolf’, in which he and a woman werewolf are alive and uncaptured at the end. What kind of moral is that?

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Yes, and I'm not sure how it's about untraditional sex. It's science fiction more than horror, isn't it? It's extrapolative of knowledge and technology. There's only a little kissing, which seems to have little to do with the plot, except that it brings out Morbius' fear that his daughter has grown up.

Horror had a message when the unnatural thing was finally destroyed by something natural and un-cold - fire or sunlight, for example. But I've seen a Jack Nicholson movie, 'Wolf', in which he and a woman werewolf are alive and uncaptured at the end. What kind of moral is that?

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My impression was that the title, "Forbidden Planet," referred to something like the forbidden fruit, in The Garden of Eden. For example, there's a scene in the film, when Morbius' daughter's passions have been (apparently for the first time) stirred, by the presence of amorous men, competing for her "attention." This change results in a change in the wild animal's behavior on the planet. Before, she had been able to pet large tigers on the head, with no fear of being harmed. After, she was surprised to see that the same tiger tried to kill her. I think the tiger is just symbolic of human passion. Whereas before she had been shielded from it, with the arrival of the crew, she was exposed to it and it appeared to bring on deadly consequences, just like the first fruit in The Garden of Eden did.

James 1:15 Then desire conceives and brings forth sin, and when sin reaches maturity it gives birth to death.

usccb.org/nab/bible/james/james1.htm

I don't know about the Jack Nicholson movie, but I tried watching a modern version of Rigoletto and was too disgusted to finish it. My impression was that instead of it being a story that, like Hamlet, illustrates the folly of revenge and unhindered passions, it would rather celebrate those things, like The Modern Era does, instead of scolding them, like we used to.

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