What I like about the Catholic Church (disability issues)


#1

there have been so many negative/difficult threads -

one thing I really like about the Church is the way it promotes the value of life for people with disabilities. Like all other groups of people this can be more ideal than reality but for example during the Holocaust a bishop spoke out against euthanasia of disabled persons, which was used to “develop” methods of mass murder later used in death camps.

I have mild cerebral palsy which affects me a lot in some ways and not at all in other ways. When I was younger I noticed 2 things - the work of some people really helped me, they had a Catholic background, and a man of another faith who had spent his life ‘passing’ for normal - which he could do with difficulty - was convinced that Catholics tended to be more supportive than other people. I’m not sure if that is really true or if he wanted to believe it but he said that even though US culture was often not supportive that I was fortunate to grow up in a faith where these principles were reinforced. I really don’t know much about how Protestant faiths address these issues.


#2

[quote="silentstar, post:1, topic:239708"]
there have been so many negative/difficult threads -

one thing I really like about the Church is the way it promotes the value of life for people with disabilities. Like all other groups of people this can be more ideal than reality but for example during the Holocaust a bishop spoke out against euthanasia of disabled persons, which was used to "develop" methods of mass murder later used in death camps.

I have mild cerebral palsy which affects me a lot in some ways and not at all in other ways. When I was younger I noticed 2 things - the work of some people really helped me, they had a Catholic background, and a man of another faith who had spent his life 'passing' for normal - which he could do with difficulty - was convinced that Catholics tended to be more supportive than other people. I'm not sure if that is really true or if he wanted to believe it but he said that even though US culture was often not supportive that I was fortunate to grow up in a faith where these principles were reinforced. I really don't know much about how Protestant faiths address these issues.

[/quote]

I agree with you wholeheartedly.

While I haven't seen many gravely disabled people in my parish, there are a few. Older people unable to stand to receive the Eucharist. A man with grave autism that's always cared for at Mass by his mother--a woman that carries a very, very large cross to and from Mass and throughout her life.

I think that the Church's respect for life in all forms is key here. Some faiths or secular groups will trump up a cause here or there, like breast cancer (while ignoring the birth control medications that likely aggravate this) or HIV (ignoring the need to reduce promiscuity and increase chastity). The Church's message transcends the Cause Flavor of the Day. Mankind's salvation is our cause as a Catholic, and we marshal every material resource we have, as the largest charitable group on the planet, to feed the poor. Comfort the sick. Rebuild lives and souls. Heal the spirit.

Can't get that from a ribbon you just wear, or a marathon you run, all to promote "awareness."

We all come to Christ in the joyful hope for rest and comfort in all and any of our many crosses, and we often bear our cross, rather than demand from God or the government some immediate redress to the matter in the form of cure or cash.


#3

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