What is a Friar, exactly?


#1

I'm a cradle Catholic who just started learning his faith 5 years ago. What I would like to know is are Friars priests? Are they deacons? The only friars I've ever seen were on EWTN. Are they part of the Holy Orders?


#2

[quote="mrmagoo661, post:1, topic:208490"]
I'm a cradle Catholic who just started learning his faith 5 years ago. What I would like to know is are Friars priests? Are they deacons? The only friars I've ever seen were on EWTN. Are they part of the Holy Orders?

[/quote]

they can be ordained but not necessarily. friars are like monks except instead of staying in a monastery they go out into the world to preach and teach


#3

Friar as a word means “Brother”.

Friars are similar to monks in that they are generally called to live together under certain rules; these typically include poverty, chastity and obedience. That means; they are to be celibate, and obedient to their superior; and generally speaking not own their own property. Some orders; however do allow friars to own books and things such as these.

A Friar will generally work out in the community and help people; depending on the order what they do is slightly different; from preaching the Gospel; to teaching; to helping feed people. Generally; Friars take permenant vows and commit themselves permenantly to being a Friar.

A Friar might also be a Deacon or a Priest; although they are not necessarily a Deacon or a Priest. Some Orders of Friars prefer to have many “Ordained” Friars; so they would have more Deacons or Priests than Brothers who are not Ordained, some however might not Ordain as many. This would really depend upon the ministry they are operating in; if there is a high need for Priests and Deacons; then there will be more; and visa versa.

Generally speaking; you address a Friar as “Brother”. A Friar works under his superior; (similar to how a monk has a superior). A Friar is not subject to his Local Bishop (diocese) so even if he is ordained a Priest or a Deacon he would not have his own parish - unless his superior and the local diocese (area) come to an agreement.

In short; a Friar is similar to monk who spends more time outside of the Friary (similar to a monestary). A Friar might be a Priest or a Deacon; but does not have to be. A Friar is subject to his superior; and not to the local Bishop. A Friar is called Brother (unless otherwise specified).


#4

Excellent response. Thank you, you answered my question perfectly.


#5

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