What is a good, easy book to read about the Protestant Reformaton?


#1

I would like to know more about the Protestant Reformation…a book that is easy to read, yet informative, preferably from a Catholic author.
Thank you.


#2

That is an incredibly broad topic. In my mind, it is impossible to think of “the” Protestant reformation. Events were occuring in England long before Luther did anything. Events is Switzerland were happening quite independent of Germany. (Luther and Zwingli did not agree on much.)

Do you want to know about the theological differences of the various parties? Rome’s response? The political and social climate at the time?

From a Lutheran perspective–
The theology:
www.bookofconcord.com

Historical perspective:
bookofconcord.com/pdf/historicalintro.pdf


#3

I would suggest Roots of the Reformation by Karl Adam. Written by a Protestant but very balanced in its approach. Marcus Grodi has recommended it many times on the Journey Home program on EWTN


#4

[quote=BillFL]I would suggest Roots of the Reformation by Karl Adam. Written by a Protestant but very balanced in its approach. Marcus Grodi has recommended it many times on the Journey Home program on EWTN
[/quote]

Speaking of the Journey Home, Marcus was interviewing someone from Ireland who once asked the prof at Oxford whom would he suggest as a good author to read from if he wanted to learn about the reformation. The prof recommended two people, one a Protestant author and the other Hilaire Belloc, a Catholic. The man was impressed that the prof would recommend a Catholic author.

I purchased one of Belloc’s books titled “Characters of the Reformation.” Belloc focuses not only on events, but on 23 different Protestant and Catholic “personalities” that were involved so the reader could get an idea as to the situations in the person’s life and thier motives for why they did what they did.

It is easy to read, and only 206 pages, but there is a lot of great info in it.

Thal59


#5

[quote=BillFL]I would suggest Roots of the Reformation by Karl Adam. Written by a Protestant but very balanced in its approach. Marcus Grodi has recommended it many times on the Journey Home program on EWTN
[/quote]

Excellant Choice !!! for many reasons

  1. Easy to read
  2. Goes right to the point
  3. Factual
  4. will never make Ophra’s list

#6

Both by Hilaire Belloc: How the Reformation Happened and The Great Heresies.

Both outstanding and easy to read.

in XT.


#7

It is a big book but most interesting:
THE CLEAVING OF CHRISTIANDOM

By Warren Carroll

Ave Maria!


#8

[quote=Ave Maria!]It is a big book but most interesting:
THE CLEAVING OF CHRISTIANDOM

By Warren Carroll

Ave Maria!
[/quote]

It is actually one of six volumes… five are already in print.


#9

[quote=AquinasXVI]Both by Hilaire Belloc: How the Reformation Happened and The Great Heresies.

Both outstanding and easy to read.

in XT.
[/quote]

:thumbsup: Dittos :thumbsup:


#10

Belloc’s How the Reformation Happened is a fine book. Anything by Belloc is worth reading.

A standard work, recognized by scholars generally, is Roland Bainton’s biography of Luther, Here I Stand.

There’s nothing wrong with just photcopying an encyclopedia article and hanging with it until it soaks in. Mark it, underline it, etc. This obvious source of top scholarship is often overlooked.


#11

The Bible! :smiley:

reen12


#12

Good and Easy:

Hillaire Belloc’s books How The Reformation Happened and Characters Of The Reformation.

He writes in a very easy style to understand. The books aren’t large but they cover the territory well.


#13

I recommend Hilaire Belloc’s books listed in the above posts,
plus
THE FACTS ABOUT LUTHER (Tan Books)
A HISTORY OF THE PROTESTANT REFORMATION IN ENGLAND AND IRELAND (William Cobbett) (from Tan Books)

Jaypeeto4 (aka Jaypeeto3)


closed #14

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