What is a Non-Catholic Franscican? Like the third order Fransiscans


#1

What does it mean to be Protestant but also be a Franciscan?

Does this make sense?

Thanks


#2

I’m not sure if this is what you’re talking about, but the Anglican Church also has religious orders.


#3

My friend told me her friend was becoming a “Franciscan Oblate,” and the first link I found was via the Anglican Franciscans. I didn’t know there were Catholic religious orders among Anglicans and Lutherans, etc.


#4

I had never heard of Lutherans having religious orders. But as a result of your post, I consulted my BFF (google), and they do, indeed! One of which is the Order of Lutheran Franciscans:

Thanks! I learned something today. :grinning:


#5

I grew up Lutheran and indeed they do have religious orders, but they’re very rare. Rarer still than Anglican orders.

There are Lutheran monks in the Benedictine tradition as well.


#6

So does having a religious order not require continuity with the Catholic origin? As in, could I just start my own “Franciscan order” right now?

In other words, I thought specific religious orders in the Catholic Church had a single jurisdiction — like don’t they all abide by similar rules and so on?


#7

A non Catholic Franciscan would not be a 3rd Order Franciscan because one must be a practicing Catholic to become a 3rd order tertiary.

A Protestant Franciscan would be a Protestant who follows some aspects of Franciscan life, but not all since St.Francis was a devout Catholic.


#8

It’s simple. There are religious orders that are Catholic and comply with Catholic rules and exist entirely within the Catholic Church.

There are other religious orders that are [fill in the blank] and comply with [fill in the blank] rules and exist entirely within [fill in the blank] church.

The Catholic Church does not have a trademark on the Rule of St. Francis or any other brand of religious life. If I felt like it, I could start a Franciscan religious order for Pentecostals. It of course, would have nothing to do with the Catholic Church.

Though, there really aren’t any Pentecostal religious orders like that because we’re not as close to the Catholic Church as say the Anglicans and Lutherans are. They still share a lot of the same traditions and beliefs that would make it possible to continue this kind of legacy.


#9

I don’t know if this is true for Franciscans, but one can become a Benedictine Oblate without being Catholic so long as one agrees to live according to the rule.

So, I suppose it depends on the charism for the group (again, no idea if this applies to Franciscans).


#10

It’s simple. There are religious orders that are Catholic and comply with Catholic rules and exist entirely within the Catholic Church.

There are other religious orders that are [fill in the blank] and comply with [fill in the blank] rules and exist entirely within [fill in the blank] church.

The Catholic Church does not have a trademark on the Rule of St. Francis or any other brand of religious life.

Would St Francis agree that you can be Protestant and a Franciscan?

I think it’s more appropriate to say this:

A Protestant Franciscan would be a Protestant who follows some aspects of Franciscan life, but not all since St.Francis was a devout Catholic.

as @LittleFlower378 said.


#11

St. Francis lived before the Protestant Reformation, so we can’t really answer that. In any case, that’s like asking, “Would Jesus agree that you can be Protestant and Christian?”


#12

In other words, I could adopt a Franciscan lifestyle on my own — even if I wasn’t Catholic. But there’s something disingenuous to call it a Franciscan order, which arose out of and depended on Catholic spirituality at its core.


#13

Not entirely on topic, but this conversation reminded me of another conversation I had with a woman who insisted she was a Christian Wiccan. Sometimes you just shake your head and move on.


#14

Or it arose out of and depended on a Western Christian spirituality that is shared by both Catholics and Protestants. See what I did there?


#15

We could argue whether or not Francis would agree with separating from Rome, changing the doctrine of the Eucharist, and that kind of stuff, though.


#16

A Catholic could adopt some aspects of Luther’s teaching, but not become a Lutheran.

That is not an exact parallel, but I think it better represents what we’re talking about when we’re talking about non-Catholic religious movements that adopt Catholic-originating religious orders.


#17

Certainly the case with Benedictine Oblates…


#18

No one is arguing that Christians of whatever stripe cannot adopt practices and be inspired by previous/other religious movements. Some Catholics have been inspired by Protestant Charismatic groups, for example.

But I wonder: Does “catholic” (small c) spirituality and diversity lend itself to Catholic unity? I think yes. In other words, why be a Franciscan Anglican when you could just bite the bullet, for sake of unity, and become Catholic?


#19

What an odd suggestion. Become Catholic simply for the sake of unity? Presumably, a Franciscan Anglican has sincere objections to Catholics doctrine…


#20

The religious orders get their approval from Rome. St.Francis would want everyone to be a devout Catholic. St.Dominic preached to those outside the Church while St.Francis preaches to those within the Church.


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