What is a Non-Catholic?


#1

A Non-Catholic is anyone who has not been baptisted in the Name of The Father, and The Son, and The Holy Spirit.


#2

[quote=Beaver]A Non-Catholic is anyone who has not been baptisted in the Name of The Father, and The Son, and The Holy Spirit.
[/quote]

And does not follow the teaching of the Catholic Church.


#3

[quote=dhgray]And does not follow the teaching of the Catholic Church.
[/quote]

What teaching?


#4

[quote=Beaver]What teaching?
[/quote]

All of them. If you are unsure of what they are, get a copy of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, the Code of Canon Law, and all of the encyclical and publishing from all of the councils and papal decrees for the last 2,000 years. I would put it here, but the content would exceed the 4,000 character limit.


#5

[quote=Apologia100]All of them. If you are unsure of what they are, get a copy of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, the Code of Canon Law, and all of the encyclical and publishing from all of the councils and papal decrees for the last 2,000 years. I would put it here, but the content would exceed the 4,000 character limit.
[/quote]

May I re-mind you of the qualifiers with the word catholic in which you speak of.


#6

[quote=Beaver]May I re-mind you of the qualifiers with the word catholic in which you speak of.
[/quote]

AH, change the facts, change the results.

You stated with a capital “C” indicating the Catholic Church. When you used a lower case “c” that indicates the universal church of believers (catholic). If your intent was to use the word catholic (as in univrsal church) then your origional statement was correct.

Then the question must be asked are you Catholic or catholic :confused:

God Bless,
Davis


#7

Well, I think"to be Catholic" one has to be baptised in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit, and ACCEPT the teachings of the Catholic Church. Not necessarily always and consistently FOLLOW them. We are all sinners (yes, even Catholics). I’m not advocating dissent, by the way or, God forbid, sin. But sinning Catholics, even (sadly) dissenting Catholics, deserve to be called Catholics, if they want to be and continue to do their best to follow the teachings of the Catholic church.

But really, why all this emphasis on Catholic as an identity?
We are all children of God (human), and many of us try to follow Christ (Christians), and some of us try to do so through the Church that Christ founded (Catholics). But it doesn’t help us much to latch onto an identity of “Catholic”. Our actions (including receiving the sacraments) matter more.


#8

Whoops, I formulated my reply in the positive, rather than the negative (who is a non-Catholic). But the answer is the same.


#9

A Non-Catholic is anyone who does not follow the teachings of the Catholic Church.

A catholic is anyone who has been baptized with a Trinity formula.

It used to be we could say a catholic and mean all Christians. Now we have Catholic Christians and catholic Christians, all are part of the Body of Christ.


#10

A non-Catholic is anyone who is not baptized. All validly baptized Protestants are Catholics too, but to varying degrees are not in full communion with the Roman Catholic Church.


#11

[quote=Wildgraywolf]A non-Catholic is anyone who is not baptized. All validly baptized Protestants are Catholics too, but to varying degrees are not in full communion with the Roman Catholic Church.
[/quote]

Ok, go tell the Baptists that they are catholic and watch their reaction:bigyikes:


#12

[quote=MariaG]A Non-Catholic is anyone who does not follow the teachings of the Catholic Church.

A catholic is anyone who has been baptized with a Trinity formula.

[/quote]

Not quite. Not all protestants are catholic.


#13

[quote=Wildgraywolf]A non-Catholic is anyone who is not baptized. All validly baptized Protestants are Catholics too, but to varying degrees are not in full communion with the Roman Catholic Church.
[/quote]

Protestants are not Catholics. Some protestants are catholic. The case of the first letter changes the meaning. A Catholic is one who is a member of the Catholic Church in unity with the Pope.


#14

Are there Protestant-Rite Catholics? You know, Catholics in communion with Rome who, nonetheless, have rites whose form is like that of the Southern Baptists, or Methodists?

If not, maybe a Protestant-Rite Catholicism could be created by a few creative Catholics in Alabama or somewhere.


#15

Big “C”, Little “c”, I like that, but is it not confussing. What happens when it starts a sentence. Are we to guess? It may be better to alway use a modifyer with the word catholic.


#16

[quote=Beaver]Big “C”, Little “c”, I like that, but is it not confussing. What happens when it starts a sentence. Are we to guess? It may be better to alway use a modifyer with the word catholic.
[/quote]

What a wonderful idea. Here’s the address of the man to whom you will need to write in order to make it happen.

Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger
Sacred Congregation for the Doctrine Faith
Piazza del S. Uffizio 11
00193 Rome, Italy

Until the Prefect of the CDF issues a directive, I’ll just call it the Catholic Church. Good luck.

Justin


#17

[quote=Beaver]Big “C”, Little “c”, I like that, but is it not confussing. What happens when it starts a sentence. Are we to guess? It may be better to alway use a modifyer with the word catholic.
[/quote]

Big “C” and little “c” are the standard form, have been for hundereds of years.


#18

I can’t believe the amount of bad evangelism on this thread! Trying to equate any degree or level of Catholicism to our separated brethren…wow. So a Seventh Day Adventist, or a Mormon, or a JW needs only the wording of a baptism to become ©©atholic???.

There is only one Church begun by the Lord Himself. And He Himself gives the importance of baptism… “One Lord, One Faith, One Baptism…” Perhaps the discussion would be more understood if we had three groups. [1] Practicing, in-the-state-of-grace, members of the one Catholic Church [2] non-practicing, members, [3] all others, Christians or not

Only [1] and [2] imply valid baptism.

MrS


#19

[quote=MrS]I can’t believe the amount of bad evangelism on this thread! Trying to equate any degree or level of Catholicism to our separated brethren…wow. So a Seventh Day Adventist, or a Mormon, or a JW needs only the wording of a baptism to become ©©atholic???.

There is only one Church begun by the Lord Himself. And He Himself gives the importance of baptism… “One Lord, One Faith, One Baptism…” Perhaps the discussion would be more understood if we had three groups. [1] Practicing, in-the-state-of-grace, members of the one Catholic Church [2] non-practicing, members, [3] all others, Christians or not

Only [1] and [2] imply valid baptism.

MrS
[/quote]

I’m afraid not. The Catholic Church itself recognizes Christian (non-Catholic) baptisms (“in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit”) as valid baptism. So most, if not all of the Christians in [3] don’t just “imply” but are valid baptisms. That doesn’t mean all Christians are catholic–I don’t know where this is coming from. I’m more concerned with whether all Catholics are (really) Christians (in act, as well as in identity)


#20

[quote=zange]I’m afraid not. The Catholic Church itself recognizes Christian (non-Catholic) baptisms (“in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit”) as valid baptism. So most, if not all of [3] don’t just “imply” but are valid baptisms
[/quote]

Yes, you are right…but the question is What is a non-Catholic. And all of [3] qualify.

Q?? Are there non-Catholics or non-catholics in Heaven?http://forums.catholic.com/images/icons/icon6.gif

MrS


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