What is an ambo?

So, I have an answer to my own question, but I just want to know that it’s right. It is like a pulpit/lectern, except it is only used for proclaiming the Word of God at Mass, right? Are homilies and announcement supposed to be or allowed to be made from the same location? If they are is it still called an Ambo? If there is a right way to do things, then I want to know what that way is, that’s all. :slight_smile:

The readings, the responsorial psalm and the homily are all correctly delivered from the ambo.

Yes, an ambo is the pulpit where the Gospel is read by the priest or deacon. I have seen the homily given from the ambo as well, though my parish priest usually comes out from behind the pulpit to give the homily. Perhaps you might look in the GIRM to find out exactly what is and isn’t allowed.

Not trying to be picky for argumentative sake but I appreciate a more definitive explanation to describe a Real Catholic Ambo.

newadvent.org/cathen/01381e.htm

The word Pulpit sounds more generic as a kin to a book support column or stand to place a book on to read from seen today from the vantage of a secular audience in a school, university, court-room or city hall. Certainly an unworthy description of a true Catholic Ambo which is rarely only seen in the majestic architecture in older Catholic Churches which also contain majestic architecture befitting of true spiritual house of God that exemplifies reverence.

These ultra-modern (“toothpick”) book-stands called Pulpits seen in most Catholic Churches today do absolutely nothing to bring attention to the edifying Word of God.

Now here’s a real Catholic Ambo

google.ca/imgres?imgurl=http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2649/4247603677_d3faacf352_o.jpg&imgrefurl=http://cathcandy.wordpress.com/2010/01/05/19th-century-english-medieval-revival-carved-ambo-font-cover/&usg=__qBD3l8Q545UN-jCqoTMHwL9mIF0=&h=1024&w=874&sz=290&hl=en&start=62&um=1&itbs=1&tbnid=nalggPhjLlgqEM:&tbnh=150&tbnw=128&prev=/images%3Fq%3DCatholic%2BAmbo%2Bpics%26start%3D42%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DN%26ndsp%3D21%26tbs%3Disch:1

There was one of those in St. Jean Baptiste Church in Dalhousie NB when I was growing up. Not as elaborate, to be sure, but elevated and the priest had to come out of the sanctuary and access it by stairs.

Was that ever used to read the the Gospel? I thought this was used primarily for preaching. The French expression “monter en chaire” (chaire being another word from ‘ambon’) usually refers to preaching.

Yes; I have been to ST-JEAN-BAPTISTE CATHOLIC CHURCH which is situated 40 miles from the Archdiocese of Moncton in Bouctouche, New Brunswick and the same Ambo still resides there. Gorgeous Catholic Church. Bouctouche is also the former home to Catholic billionaire J.D. Irving who gave millions of dollars refurbishing ST-JEAN-BAPTISTE into its original grandeur. On June 24, 1785, two men carved a cross on a tall pine tree, in the middle of the Bouctouche wilderness, as a symbol of their faith. Charlitte and François LeBlanc had left Memramcook six days before to explore the region, finally stopping on the fertile land by the shores of Bouctouche Bay. The LeBlanc brothers knelt at the foot of the tree bearing the cross and asked God to protect their future church, thereby taking part in one of the first Catholic services in what is now St-Jean Baptiste Parish.

Built at Pointe-à-Jacquot in 1898. Although it burnt to the ground in 1921, this church was rebuilt, with its current foundations laid in 1926.

Just the reverse. The picture you have titled an ambo is a pulpit. That’s why we read historical accounts of “Fr. XYZ mounted the pulpit” – meaning he stepped up some stairs into the elevated pulpit. They also had passive voice resonators that often hanged overhead. Pulpits really aren’t necessary anymore withe the advent of better illumination and audio amplification. Surf through a few on-line antique church furnishing stores to get a better idea of what’s an ambo versus a pulpit.

An ambo is very much a lectern or rostrum – although hopefully a substantial one. Many churches had a lectern for reading the Epistles while they kept the pulpit reserved for the proclamation of the Gospel. Now the direction is to have a single ambo – although cantors still often have cantor stands. Even then the church suggests it’s best if the responsorial psalm is sung from the ambo.

I’ve never been in the Buctouche church, I was referring to the one in Dalhousie, on the North Shore. That ambo was removed after a fire caused much damage and the church had to be refurbished.

I didn’t know that KC Irving was Catholic. I just thought he was a philanthropist who never forgot his community.

I think it can be a little confusing since there are two Catholic Churches bearing similar names with the Catholic Church in Dalhousie being 35 kilometers north of Buctouche in Restigouche county.

Eglises Catholiques Presbyteres, Paroisse St Jean Baptist in Dalhousie is much smaller than the Church in Buctouche.

I didn’t know that KC Irving was Catholic. I just thought he was a philanthropist who never forgot his community

Yes he was Catholic although he’s deceased now and his sons run his oil tycoon business.

More like 235 km north.

It’s a lovely looking church and I’ve often wanted to stop and visit but now that you bypass the town completely when travelling it has not proven convenient.

More like 235km is true…typo error on my part.

Actually I very rarely find myself traveling up near Campbellton/Dalhousie area.
And if your coming from Nova Scotia or southern New Brunswick heading west to Montreal, Ottawa or Toronto I’ll drive through Maine, Vermont and New Hampshire unless your in a rush.

Anyways getting back to Ambo’s without trying to hyjack this thread.

= boatbearer:**Just the reverse. The picture you have titled an ambo is a pulpit. That’s why we read historical accounts of “Fr. XYZ mounted the pulpit” – meaning he stepped up some stairs into the elevated pulpit. They also had passive voice resonators that often hanged overhead. Pulpits really aren’t necessary anymore withe the advent of better illumination and audio amplification. Surf through a few on-line antique church furnishing stores to get a better idea of what’s an ambo versus a pulpit.

An ambo is very much a lectern or rostrum – although hopefully a substantial one. Many churches had a lectern for reading the Epistles while they kept the pulpit reserved for the proclamation of the Gospel. Now the direction is to have a single ambo – although cantors still often have cantor stands. Even then the church suggests it’s best if the responsorial psalm is sung from the ambo. **

In my parish there’s two pulpits identical in design, shape and form with no distinguishing allocation to say one is the Lectionary Ambo or the other being any different except to the fact of a pulpit close to the Presidential Chair for the Priest and the Ambo to the left front side of the Altar (“standing on the Sanctuary”) looking out at the congregation.

Again no real significance unless one is familiar with Sanctuary furnishings and I being a former Sacristan, the average parishioner wouldn’t notice the difference.

To me the Ambo should strictly be used for the Liturgy of the Word and Homilies given by the Priest. Nothing more, no church announcements should be broached from the Ambo.

Over the years the Ambo has lost its edifying significance in how it is designed to look so ordinaire like buying a book-stand at Walmart.

From the 2002 General Instruction of the Roman Missal (GIRM) approved for the USA, which can be accessed from romanrite.com/girm.html :
The Ambo
309. The dignity of the word of God requires that the church have a place that is suitable for the proclamation of the word and toward which the attention of the whole congregation of the faithful naturally turns during the Liturgy of the Word.
It is appropriate that this place be ordinarily a stationary ambo and not simply a movable lectern. The ambo must be located in keeping with the design of each church in such a way that the ordained ministers and lectors may be clearly seen and heard by the faithful.
From the ambo only the readings, the responsorial Psalm, and the Easter Proclamation (Exsultet) are to be proclaimed; it may be used also for giving the homily and for announcing the intentions of the Prayer of the Faithful. The dignity of the ambo requires that only a minister of the word should go up to it.
It is appropriate that a new ambo be blessed according to the rite described in the Roman Ritual before it is put into liturgical use.”
(My bold text, footnotes removed.)

Thank you, John Lilburne!

For you Canadians: My favorite ambo is in the Basilica (Cathedral?) in St. John’s Newfoundland, which I believe is also named for St. John the Baptist! The basilica and city, actually . . .

Also, the article at this link

newadvent.org/cathen/01381e.htm

implies that Socrates spoke about St. John Crysostom. If its the only Socrates I know of, he live about 700 yeas before St. John Crysostom. What’s the deal here, Centurionguard?

You see how “Socrates” is in blue? Click on it.

What’s the deal here, Centurionguard?

If you have a correlation point share it.

My point is, please go back to the page you linked. The name “Socrates” is in blue, which means it’s a hyperlink. Click on it, and read the results (I also linked to the target in my previous post for your convenience, but here it is again). Hopefully that will answer your question –

Here’s the url link I quoted: newadvent.org/cathen/01381e.htm. Not the link you suggested newadvent.org/cathen/14118b.htm.

Yeah and in past years the were often more grand than the altar of sacrifice…

Having an ambo and a lectern seems to make the most sense. It was certainly common in the early church as an influence from synagogues.

Sorry, I didn’t mean for this to be a big deal. You wrote:

If its the only Socrates I know of, he live about 700 yeas before St. John Crysostom.

But it’s not that Socrates (the teacher of Plato), it’s a 4th-5th century Church historian with the same name. If you had clicked on his name, you would have been taken to the article about him (which I also linked to) which would have explained this.

**Yeah and in past years the were often more grand than the altar of sacrifice…
**

I suppose your correct there particularly when looking at an Ancient Ambo in size differential. But I think most devout Catholics even then focused on the Altar of Sacrifice and the Holy Tabernacle being of greater importance.

Having an ambo and a lectern seems to make the most sense. It was certainly common in the early church as an influence from synagogues.

Indeed; which has made me have a high regard for the symbolic significance and history of the Ambo.

Respectfully; I hope you don’t mind me asking if your a priest in which place I’ll address you accordingly given the picture by your name.

Peace
Chris

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