What is pretended celebration of the Eucharist?


#1

Is this a literal pretend? As in using anything (in private) and pretending to take the Eucharist?

Or is it stealing the Eucharist and taking it? :confused:


#2

[quote="SeanF1989, post:1, topic:295664"]
Is this a literal pretend? As in using anything (in private) and pretending to take the Eucharist?

Or is it stealing the Eucharist and taking it? :confused:

[/quote]

This is in reference to a situation of someone impersonating a priest and saying mass in front of the people.


#3

[quote="SeanF1989, post:1, topic:295664"]
Is this a literal pretend? As in using anything (in private) and pretending to take the Eucharist?

Or is it stealing the Eucharist and taking it? :confused:

[/quote]

I don't know what they would call it in seminaries but seminarians when they are deacons I think, practice the mass so they are "experienced" in celebrating mass when they can actually do it.

but you may be talking about something else not real sure.

it could also be this youtube.com/watch?v=VijOvBUT9jA :D


#4

I am no sure of the particular context of your question. However several ways the sacraments are simulated are:
The Catholic women who have been "ordained" as priests, then attempt to celebrate mass. Since they are not actually priests, they then are simulating this sacrament.
Men who pretend to be priests. Here is an example in my parish. A man showed up at the parish office who said he was a priest. Apparently, they were convinced by him though he had no papers (or perhaps forged papers)--I did not hear precisely what happened then. After a month or two of saying mass, he began taking money from the people supposedly for some cause, and then, suspicious, they found he was no priest. He was put in jail briefly, was released and disappeared.
From what I have heard, anyone who simulates a sacrament is automatically excommunicated.
Perhaps seminarians legitimately make dry runs in preparation for ordination, though this is not a matter that has been Catholic news.


#5

Of course seminarians must practice the Mass. How on earth would they be properly able to celebrate Mass after they are ordained if they do not practice before hand?

Practicing is not pretending. They are not ordained priests and know perfectly well that they are not empowered to consecrate the Eucharist, but are preparing for priesthood.

I’m certain most of them are nervous when they say their first Mass after ordination - that is why a priest’s first Mass is a concelebrated Mass, with the new priest as the principal celebrant and an experienced priest concelebrating with him, in case he makes a mistake that would have invalidated the Mass if he celebrated alone.


#6

There is something in canon law that says simulation of the Eucharist is strictly forbidden, or something like that. The word is “simulation”, implying that it wasn’t a valid consecration even if the externals seem to imply that.

This only happens if there are unwilling participants to such an attempt, meaning there are those who believe there is an actually Mass. Seminarians practicing the rubrics and the words are not doing such a simulation because everyone there knows that it is not Mass that they are doing but just practicing. They are not pretending that there is a Mass going on, they know there isn’t.


#7

Merciful heavens… So Parishioners actually went a month or two with invalid Masses? It seems as if there is no level that people won’t stoop to in order to defraud innocent and trusting people of money these days.

J.M.J.


#8

This is nothing new. In the days of the Soviet Union, Stalin had his secret police have young officers secretly join the Orthodox Church and enter semenaries for the sole purpose of subverting the Orthodox Clergy. He also had agents pose as priests so as to spy on people via confession. He did this regularly in Soviet occupied Eastern Poland during WW II in order to so distrust of the Clergy amongst the people. Thank G*d the people had unshakable faith and were too smart for that.


#9

this is why as a Catholic priest if you step outside of the diocese and plan to use your faculties (say mass, hear confession, do a baptism and so on and so forth) you must get a letter that says Fr. X is a priest in good standing with the Church, along with other things. I wish we didn’t have to do this but in the world we live into today its unfortunately necessary.


#10

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