What is purgatory suppose to be like? Is it something to fear?


#1

It seems like a lot of people will go there.

I have several questions about it.

What is it suppose to be like according to the church?

I’ve heard it’s temporary hell but I don’t see why it would be other than in the sense of suffering of not being able to be in heaven yet.

Wouldn’t it be more like a transitional period for the soul to become purified enough to enter heaven? Like transforming the soul to become fully good and pure and one with God.

How would suffering and pain do that? Just like how good is punishing a child by hitting the child when it does wrong rather than making the child take timeout and teach them to see why it is wrong.


#2

1 Corinthians 3:10-15 is a good description of Purgatory:

10According to the grace of God given to me, like a skilled master builder I laid a foundation, and another man is building upon it. Let each man take care how he builds upon it. 11For no other foundation can any one lay than that which is laid, which is Jesus Christ. 12Now if any one builds on the foundation with gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay, straw-- 13each man’s work will become manifest; for the Day will disclose it, because it will be revealed with fire, and the fire will test what sort of work each one has done. 14If the work which any man has built on the foundation survives, he will receive a reward. 15If any man’s work is burned up, he will suffer loss, though he himself will be saved, but only as through fire.


#3

So that means if your still faithful to God and have a good relationship with him at your death you will enter heaven? If you are still faithful but have sinned before death and are sorry you will be saved by purgatory?

What about the Church though? If you receive confession right before you pass like on your death bed is it possible to go straight to heaven? I know only God knows but what does the church officially teach?


#4

It is indeed possible to go straight to heaven if one had made a perfect act of contrition and received last rites and has prayed over the course of one’ s life and not had any past forgiven mortal sins that require the temporal punishment still. Even if there are long past forgiven mortal sins the debts owed these can be overcome through prayer and good deeds of mercy and charity.

In all probability though most of us will probably spend some time in purgatory since unless one has been very devout over a substantial part of their lives there is often an attachment to sin - even forgiven sin. This is like an “appetite” or familiarity with sin that can linger long after it is forgiven (like a person who quits smoking late in life but still has an occasional urge to light up).

This is why it is important to work on indulgences and devotions during one’s life to try to reduce or eliminate any unsatisfied debts for forgiven sins and to overcome those lingering memories. It can take an entire life to perfect one’s self but a profound conversion is also possible.

The best advise is to pray daily (especially in front of a sacred photo or symbol that is blessed) and work these devotionals. I highly recommend everyone work the Sacred Heart of Jesus and Immaculate Heart of Mary first Friday/Sat devotionals. These have promises of final deliverance and last rites and speedy release from purgatory if you have to go there.

Also, Divine Mercy Sunday and its devotional has a profund full plenary devotion that wipes out ALL temporal debts that is similar in efficacy to a baptism and is almost unconditional (except for requirement for confession, communion, acts of mercy and praying for the pope). I recommend doing this each year.

One can also join various rosary and religious order confraternities who will all say masses for you all your life and after your death to assist you in progressing through purgatory.

Use the Church’s abundent spiritual graces and indulgences - that is what they are here for. Use them for your family and friends too.

The focus should be on God’s Mercy and abundant promises and merciful grace. It is also good to have a healthy fear and respect for God along with a genuine love of God.

Good Luck - hope to see you on the other side,
James


#5

I will be very happy if I find myself in puragtory because it will mean I have been saved, even if I need a short or long period of purification.


#6

Yea me too.

But I’ve read some things that the pain in purgatory even so is so great that it’s basically hell but just for a finite time. Even then it could be hundreds of human years there or time could go very slowly if there even is such thing as time in purgatory.

It is also said that in heaven there is no sense of “time” since that tends to be a universal think (this dimension) but in heaven it doesn’t exist like other things of this world, hunger, thirst, pain, dispair, ect.

Like in commercials and movies where you could have all the food you want and sit at the beach ect. As a kid I use to think even going to heaven you would get bored since it’s eternity. I use to think you’d be like well i’ve done everything do I just sit here and recline in some paradise forever?Like even if I lived in hawaii, I’d get bored eventually even if it takes 100 years.

Now as I understand it there is none of that in heaven since every joy is satisfied and magnified more than it could ever be here on earth.

Who knows about purgatory. While I would be happy that it’s not forever, it’d still be a tough journey for the soul. Actually thinking about it, what if the soul for all that time does not know it is in purgatory and thinks it is in hell until released!? Now wouldn’t that be painful.


#7

When you sin you do two major things: You waste the time God gave you on earth to grow in holiness and you grow more attached to sin (the “urge” grows).

Heaven is requires you not only be pure, but that even the urges to sin are removed. Even if you are not guilty of a sin does not mean the urge to that sin is removed. The urge grows stronger the more you engage and dwell on that sin, or the urge decreases or is even eliminated the more you practice renouncement and mortification on earth.

Purgatory removes any undefeated urges as well as perfects any aspects of your life that are not fully sanctified, just like a gardener prunes branches that are hindering growth or minimizing full potential.


#8

Here is the CCC on purgatory:

1030 All who die in God’s grace and friendship, but still imperfectly purified, are indeed assured of their eternal salvation; but after death they undergo purification, so as to achieve the holiness necessary to enter the joy of heaven.
1031 The Church gives the name Purgatory to this final purification of the elect, which is entirely different from the punishment of the damned. The Church formulated her doctrine of faith on Purgatory especially at the Councils of Florence and Trent. the tradition of the Church, by reference to certain texts of Scripture, speaks of a cleansing fire:
As for certain lesser faults, we must believe that, before the Final Judgment, there is a purifying fire. He who is truth says that whoever utters blasphemy against the Holy Spirit will be pardoned neither in this age nor in the age to come. From this sentence we understand that certain offenses can be forgiven in this age, but certain others in the age to come.

How would suffering and pain do that? Just like how good is punishing a child by hitting the child when it does wrong rather than making the child take timeout and teach them to see why it is wrong.

In Purgatory we finally let go of our selfishness. The pain we feel is not the cruel punishment of abuse. It’s instead the pain of withdrawal, letting go of favorite bad habits and addictions that separate us from God.

Imagine how you would feel if you had to quit, all at the same time, smoking, getting drunk, oversleeping, extra-marital conjugal relationships, fattening foods, and video games. And then, while still nursing a hangover and feeling completely wiped out, having to tend to all the chores you’d neglected like cleaning out the basement, fixing the fence, weeding the yard, babysitting the colicy baby, shampooing the carpets, and going to the dentist to have your teeth drilled.

That’s what I imagine Purgatory is like. You’ll sure feel a lot better when it’s all done, but getting throught it all… ohhhhh… planetsmilies.com/smilies/scared/scared0011.gif


#9

Here is a passage in Colossians 2 that seems to go against the idea of a purgatory—
13 When you were dead in your transgressions and the uncircumcision of your flesh, He made you alive together with Him, having forgiven us all our transgressions,
14 having canceled out the certificate of debt consisting of decrees against us, which was hostile to us; and He has taken it out of the way, having nailed it to the cross.

If He has forgiven (no longer counted against) us all our sins why would purgatory be necessary?

The other passage that is crucial about this is found in I John 1:7–
but if we walk in the Light as He Himself is in the Light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus His Son cleanses us from all sin.

The only thing that can cleanse us from sin is the blood of Christ. There is no passage in Scripture that i’m aware of that says fire cleanses a person from sin.


#10

The first passage talks about your initial conversion, the second passage talks about sins forgiven after each sin and repentance (1 Jn 1:9-2:2). The first passage wouldn’t require purgatory, while the second one would (but doesn’t mention it).

One popular purgatory/fire passage is 1 Cor 3:15.


#11

Catholic Dude;3968970]The first passage talks about your initial conversion, the second passage talks about sins forgiven after each sin and repentance (1 Jn 1:9-2:2). The first passage wouldn’t require purgatory, while the second one would (but doesn’t mention it).

Why would John 1:9-2:2 require purgatory if the blood of Christ “cleanses us from ALL sin”?
All would encompasses every sin we ever commit.

One popular purgatory/fire passage is 1 Cor 3:15.

Your right it is popular but does it really deal with the purfication of sin or something else?


#12

Without PURGATORY, stealing a piece of gum or swearing, if unforgiven before death, would send someone to hell for all eternity. Remember, nothing IMPURE can enter the Kingdom of Heaven and that includes stained souls. God, in all His wisdom, created purgatory for the little unforgiven sins. :thumbsup:


#13

Every sin MUST BE REPENTED before forgiveness can occur. How can you repent of a future sin? :eek:


#14

It is true that nothing impure can enter heaven. That’s why we are cleansed by the blood of Christ. That alone is what cleanses us.


#15

How do you get cleansed without repentance? YOU DON’T.


#16

No, the context of John’s message is talking to Christians who fall into sin. Not once you repent you don’t ever have to repent for future sins, that is abominable and un-Bibilcal (as if Jesus pre-paid for you to sin).

Your right it is popular but does it really deal with the purfication of sin or something else?

I say it deals with purification, but that is another thread. I don’t want to take someone else thread and derail it.


#17

Catholic Dude;3969371]
Originally Posted by 389670

389670
Why would John 1:9-2:2 require purgatory if the blood of Christ “cleanses us from ALL sin”?
All would encompasses every sin we ever commit.

Catholic Dude
No, the context of John’s message is talking to Christians who fall into sin. Not once you repent you don’t ever have to repent for future sins, that is abominable and un-Bibilcal (as if Jesus pre-paid for you to sin).

The “cleansing” that we recieve from the blood of Christ is not about repentance but about the cleansing action of His blood that goes on in a believer. In fact the word cleansing in I John 1:7 has the characteristic of [katharízei, pres. act indic., **keeps cleansing or is able to cleanse] from all sin.”

Your comment about “as if Jesus pre-paid for you to sin” is actually true. He paid the price for all sins --past-present-future.

I say it deals with purification, but that is another thread. I don’t want to take someone else thread and derail it.

Actually i do agree that it deal with purification. The blood of Christ is continually cleansing us from all sins.


#18

or is able to cleanse] from all sin.”

Are you receiving Christ’s body and blood weekly at the mass? If you do then yes, Christ’s blood cleanses us of all venial sins. But if you are in grave sin you may not receive Christ’s blood and must FIRST repent, then come to Jesus through the sacrement of repentance, be forgiven by the infinite merits of Christ’s passion on the cross, then you may then reenter into full communion with Christ through His Church. If you are not receiving Christ’s body and blood then you know the verse “you have no life in you”.

True to the extent that one avails oneself of this grace through cooperating with it DAILY (give us this day our daily bread) . But if one sins gravely then one separates oneself willfully from Christ’s grace and that person becomes dead to Christ unless he repented again. At repentance one is fully restored to good grace and life just like the Prodigal’s Son was. But God’s grace is not a magic elixir that permits one to purposely sin with the confidence that that grace will instantly make the sin a holy act!! Simon the Magician though of Christ’s grace in this erroneous manner just as some modern teachings of men in the 1500’s, rediscovered the same error and taught 100’s of millions this lie to push them toward the abyss while foolishly singing “hallelujah”.

Utterly wrong! :eek: This is unbiblical and an innovation of man of recent times that no Apostle EVER taught and no Christian ever believed until the 1500’s :eek:

James


#19

or is able to cleanse] from all sin.”

It IS about repentance, for that is what the very passage is talking with. Sinning and repenting. As for “cleansing from all sin”, that does not at all imply future sins, if I fall into the mud I can get “fully washed” meaning every part of me is rinsed, but that says nothing about falling into the mud tomorrow.

Your comment about “as if Jesus pre-paid for you to sin” is actually true. He paid the price for all sins–past-present-future.

No, that is blasphemous. That means Jesus died so you could/would sin, not that you would stop/avoid. If Jesus “pre-paid” for the sin of rape that means your are actually required to commit that sin or else Jesus was unjustly treated.

Actually i do agree that it deal with purification. The blood of Christ is continually cleansing us from all sins.

There is truth to that in so far as when we are living a good live grace helps us to shed off what leads us to sin, but your comment is false if taken in the sense that you are pure or are being purified even during the very act of sin. Protestant theology (via the imputation of Christ’s Righteousness) teaches that God considers a Christian fully righteous even during the very act of rape. This is pure blasphemy.


#20

No, that is blasphemous. That means Jesus died so you could/would sin, not that you would stop/avoid. If Jesus “pre-paid” for the sin of rape that means your are actually required to commit that sin or else Jesus was unjustly treated.
[/quote]

Dude,

I would suggest backing off just a little bit on this one.

Remember that God, in His Omniscience, already knows all the sins you have ever, are ever, or will ever commit, even though you can’t imagine them yet. And just as He already knows all the sins of anyone who has ever lived, so He also knows all the sins of everyone who has not yet been born. God has ALWAYS known this.

So when we say that Jesus “pre-paid” for our sins, that’s true, but He did so with full knowledge that we could not grasp. He did so knowing with 100% certainty what all our sins would ever be.

Yet He chose to pay the price for our sins - all our sins - and do so willingly. The only injustice here is that the person paying the ultimate price was not us.

Our sins are forgiven… BUT… we can not receive that forgiveness unless we sincerely repent and ask for it.


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