What is the benefit of eating Jesus' flesh and blood?


#1

What good does the flesh do to us? Why is it better than believing the bread and wine are only a symbol of what Jesus did for us?

I do not doubt Our Eucharist. I just want to hear what Catholics (and even non-Catholics) have to say about what the actual benefits are, not just why you believe He does truly become food for us.

Please, non-Catholics, feel free to share your devotion to Breaking Bread as well! I genuinely would like to learn more of your understanding of the practice:)

Peace be with you
Michael


#2

There is nothing that brings me more joy than to know that Lord is quite literally within me. :slight_smile:

Not sure how a symbol could possibly have the same effect with this knowledge.


#3

I am the bread of life. Your ancestors ate the manna in the desert, but they died; this is the bread that comes down from heaven so that one may eat it and not die. I am the living bread that came down from heaven; whoever eats this bread will live forever; (John 6:48-51)

No other reason is better said.


#4

[quote="Stylteralmaldo, post:2, topic:324489"]
There is nothing that brings me more joy than to know that Lord is quite literally within me. :)

Not sure how a symbol could possibly have the same effect with this knowledge.

[/quote]

Amen;)

But most legit Christians believe He is with us in the Holy Spirit. Why is His flesh important?


#5

"...being under the guidance of the Comforter, in obedience to the bishop and the presbytery with an undivided mind, breaking one and the same bread, which is the medicine of immortality, and the antidote which prevents us from dying, but a cleansing remedy driving away evil, that we should live in God through Jesus Christ." - St Ignatius of Antioch (disciple of the Apostle John), Epistle to the Ephesians, Ch 20


#6

[quote="rcwitness, post:4, topic:324489"]
Amen;)

But most legit Christians believe He is with us in the Holy Spirit. Why is His flesh important?

[/quote]

Does God dwell within these Christians or does does only dwell with them? Think about this and you may have the answer you are looking for.

"Legit" Christians are exactly that because Christ is with them. But there is a world of difference between walking with Christ for others and actually working as Christ to others.


#7

For me the highlight of the Mass is being able to receive our Lord (body & blood; sould and divinity) in the Eucharist. With the knowledge that the Eucharist cotains the real presence of Jesus I am both humbles and in awe each tme I go to Mass and it is in being able to receive the Eucharist that I become what I eat!:thumbsup:


#8

It is food for the journey.

With “regular” food, the food becomes part of us.

With the Body and Blood of Jesus, we become part of it…more and more like Jesus. We become the gift we receive.


#9

Read John 6 … especially verses 20 to 70.

These are the words spoken by Jesus Himself.

And then come on back and let’s talk.


#10

We are created body and soul. We are both flesh and spirit. As Catholics, we have the sublime privilege of partaking of Christ in both physical and spiritual forms. A nun teaching an intro liturgy class at seminary once shared with us, "when I receive Communion, I'm closer to the Lord than a husband to his wife." I share her view, as I believe there is no greater intimacy this side of heaven than for a creature to be allowed to literally eat his Creator. :heaven:

Grateful to share,

Tom


#11

[quote="Monte_RCMS, post:9, topic:324489"]
Read John 6 ... especially verses 20 to 70.

These are the words spoken by Jesus Himself.

And then come on back and let's talk.

[/quote]

I have a thread on John 6. I love that whole discourse;)

Im not doubting Our Eucharist, or His blessings in partaking. I am looking for Catholic's to share what they believe about the actual benefits

For example, I believe all genuine Christians receive the Word of God in their hearts. But we all tend to filter the Word first. Catholics submit to an authority of Christs whole body in the Church in order to protect themselves from creating a diminished image of Him. And the greatest way to accomplish this is through the Eucharist. We receive Him " unfiltered", not a partial image of what we agree with and what we dont. All Him and nothing else. Of course it is our obligation to receive in good conscience and a clean heart.
Michael


#12

The benefit of doing what Jesus Christ commanded us to do should be benefit enough for ANYONE.

There ARE other benefits, but every Christian should be beholden to that one, if nothing else…


#13

[quote="Stylteralmaldo, post:6, topic:324489"]
....................

"Legit" Christians are exactly that because Christ is with them. But there is a world of difference between walking with Christ for others and actually working as Christ to others.

[/quote]

:confused:


#14

When I was first called to conversion (as a non-practicing Jew), I felt the presence of the Eucharist before I understood what it was about. I was compelled (only good word) to visit Catholic churches, but occasionally I goofed and entered non-Catholic churches and it "felt" different. Wrong. Empty. In Catholic churches, on the other hand, I felt drawn to that strange box by or behind the altar that resembled the box that held the torah in the synagogues. But for some unknown reason, I felt my heart pulled towards that box and when it was there, the space no longer felt empty. Even the rather enormous and cold interior of the Cathedral in San Francisco. I wanted to sit close and be there with... a box. It was bizarre.

It took a few weeks of reading before I learned about the real presence. Then everything began to fall into place.

There were other issues to confront, of course. My conversion was rather long and rocky. But the real presence definitely had a BIG part in it. It went way beyond something I just read and accepted as doctrine. It was as real as anything else in life. SomeONE was in that tabernacle. I knew it and felt it before I "learned" about it.


#15

[quote="rcwitness, post:4, topic:324489"]
Amen;)

But most legit Christians believe He is with us in the Holy Spirit. Why is His flesh important?

[/quote]

It is the risen, glorious Christ that we receive in the Eucharist. Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity. The more receptive, prayerful, humble, sincere that we are, the more He can work in us.


#16

[quote="rcwitness, post:1, topic:324489"]
What good does the flesh do to us? Why is it better than believing the bread and wine are only a symbol of what Jesus did for us?

I do not doubt Our Eucharist. I just want to hear what Catholics (and even non-Catholics) have to say about what the actual benefits are, not just why you believe He does truly become food for us.

Please, non-Catholics, feel free to share your devotion to Breaking Bread as well! I genuinely would like to learn more of your understanding of the practice:)

Peace be with you
Michael

[/quote]

thank you for including the Breaking Bread Christians.
Secondly, thank you for the thread and opportunity.

I guess, technically, I am neither.**
Having Broken Bread most of my life, I felt Him with me and within me as my faith in Him grew.
(And if I converted at this very moment, I stilll will have Broken Bread longer.)
Did I as yet know the Catholic teaching on this? Not at all. So perhaps I knew something before I knew something. You know?! :p
But, in later years, as I did learn the Catholic teaching, I said, "Hey! Wait a minute...!"
(And I never understood the Breaking Bread's view of the Crucifix, and again, before I knew the whys of each "side," so to to speak. Once I understood each view, (Good Friday 2011), I said, "Hey! Wait a minute...!"

** I am in RCIA and cannot partake. This saddens me. Not only because I believe in the manner required to partake, but also, because, unwittingly, I always have....


#17

[quote="sojo, post:14, topic:324489"]
When I was first called to conversion (as a non-practicing Jew), I felt the presence of the Eucharist before I understood what it was about. I was compelled (only good word) to visit Catholic churches, but occasionally I goofed and entered non-Catholic churches and it "felt" different. Wrong. Empty. In Catholic churches, on the other hand, I felt drawn to that strange box by or behind the altar that resembled the box that held the torah in the synagogues. But for some unknown reason, I felt my heart pulled towards that box and when it was there, the space no longer felt empty. Even the rather enormous and cold interior of the Cathedral in San Francisco. I wanted to sit close and be there with... a box. It was bizarre.

It took a few weeks of reading before I learned about the real presence. Then everything began to fall into place.

There were other issues to confront, of course. My conversion was rather long and rocky. But the real presence definitely had a BIG part in it. It went way beyond something I just read and accepted as doctrine. It was as real as anything else in life. SomeONE was in that tabernacle. I knew it and felt it before I "learned" about it.

[/quote]

MANY, many people have had the same experience as you have had.

In a Catholic church, even one that is "empty", many people "feel" the presence of another person.

In a non-Catholic church, ... it fees like just another empty room.


#18

[quote="cheezey, post:13, topic:324489"]
:confused:

[/quote]

Let me explain to hopefully allieviate your confusion. A legitimate Christian is one who not only professes to be Christian but also lives the faith. To say you are Christian but then act contrary to the teachings of Christ makes one a hypocrite and therefore not a legitimate Christian person in the eyes of God.


#19

[quote="rcwitness, post:4, topic:324489"]
Amen;)

But most legit Christians believe He is with us in the Holy Spirit. Why is His flesh important?

[/quote]

Because He told us to do it.

That's all the reasons I need.

Praise God that our Church has not lost its way over the centuries...then again, He also established the Church!

:thumbsup:


#20

[quote="cheezey, post:16, topic:324489"]

** I am in RCIA and cannot partake. This saddens me. Not only because I believe in the manner required to partake, but also, because, unwittingly, I always have....

[/quote]

I was a co-leader in RCIA this past year and there were some in our class who expressed the same sadness you do. I'm sure some of those awaiting their First Holy Communion had partaken before, and had belief, though we didn't discuss it formally during class. I can definitely sympathize with you, having to wait to receive Jesus fully in the Blessed Sacrament. Could I make a suggestion? You might look at it this way: you've been invited to the feast, you have your "invitation" in hand, but the day of the feast hasn't come yet. Please keep trusting in the Lord, that there is a purpose for your waiting, and that their will be such sweetness when you receive Him in full communion with the Church.

There are other Catholics who have to wait to receive their Sacraments, too. I'm discerning the priesthood, and at this point I will have to wait about 6 years before ordination (if this is truly what God is calling me to be). Let's not forget engaged couples who typically also must wait months before experiencing the full blessings of Holy Matrimony.

May God continue to bless you on your journey, and may the peace of Christ be with you.

Grateful to share,

:)

Tom


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