What is the Catholic view of Gerrymandering?


#1

Should Gerrymandering be illegal? Should it remain? Is Gerrymandering immoral?


#2

Attempts to marginalize groups of people, keeping their *legal vote from counting, are immoral.

On a side note, it’s also immoral to vote as one’s Uncle Willy.


#3

the “catholic vote” in america has been proven to be “mainstream” “milquetoast” and basically progressive liberal, if not outright progressive neo-socialist

i am not sure how gerrymandering would affect the catholic vote one way or the other

the more “blue” the state the more catholics that live there

just look at the US northeast


#4

I would say intention has something to do with, maybe a lot. If it’s someone intention to get anti-Catholic, anti-life, anti-marriage politicians elected by gerrymandering, then that’s a problem, maybe even a mortal sin.


#5

It is in the eye of the beholder, perhaps. The most gerrymandered seats in the US House of Representatives today are the African-American districts. This has greatly increased the number of African-Americans in the House. The courts have tolerated such racial gerrymandering to redress past discrimination. The courts take a dim view of purely partisan gerrymandering and so should fair minded voters.


#6

no one needs to gerrymander any district to get catholics to vote along progressive lines

the states with the most catholics have been obama’s biggest supporters


#7

American Catholics have been guzzling the progressive Koolaid by the liter since the late 1900s, sadly. No gerrymandering is needed on them.

ICXC NIKA


#8

Some of those voting districts seem to resemble a serpent don’t they?,…watch out for the heel!


#9

Gerrymandering is of course entirely dishonest and manipulative, along with the absurd lie that votes should’t be cast with pencils and counted by hand. Virtually everything having to do with politics seems dirty, false and rotten to me, and in my entire life there has never been even a single U.S. politician who has come close to representing what I stand for or believe in.


#10

Hello, I asked this question last night, but I want to ask it again around this time of the day (assuming more people are on the computer around this time) so more people can get in on this.

Should Gerrymandering be allowed or abolished? Is Gerrymandering immoral?

Definition of Gerrymandering from Google:

manipulate the boundaries of (an electoral constituency) so as to favor one party or class.
achieve (a result) by manipulating the boundaries of an electoral constituency.


#11

No. It is immoral and (IMHO) should be illegal as it’s a blatant attempt to interfere with the democratic process.


#12

I agree completely, but good luck ever reversing it back to any sort of normalcy from a map or population perspective. Both major parties seem to like it.


#13

We will never never ever manage to get rid of anything that allows the party in power to grab more votes.


#14

Its a manipulative way leaders use to stay in control. I don’t know what an alternative solution would be. I think the best solution would be to institute restrictions on the areas, ie: each district has to be a solid area, it has to be to rectangular/square, etc.


#15

Yeah, or a city / county / already existing border that makes sense. My congressional district is absolutely absurd and there are a lot out there worse.


#16

Yes, there are. The district I used to be in some time ago was shaped like a three-bladed fan.


#17

It should be noted that gerrymandering has a downside to the party it favors. A good example is the district in Georgia that Newt Gingrich used to represent. Democrats redrew its boundaries so black voters could send one of their own to congress. The new boundaries effectively moved a number of blacks to an adjoining district. Blacks vote heavily Democrat so this reduced Newt’s opposition, and he won the election. Meanwhile, blacks got their representative in their redrawn district but at a heavy price paid by Newt’s opponent.


#18

That sounds like an elegant and simple solution. There are some states that have this for counties and for state districts. But for US Congressional districts, I don’t think it would really be a solution. The districts are tied to states which are irregularly shaped and were often carved out for highly political reasons.

As long as we have a Constitution that ties the number of US Representatives to population, and as long as population is a moving target, there won’t be any 100% fair solution. That means that virtually any plan to draw district boundaries is going to contain some element of gerrymandering.


#19

This is gerrymandering:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maryland%27s_3rd_congressional_district#mediaviewer/File:Maryland_US_Congressional_District_3_%28since_2013%29.tif

No Republican has won this district since 1929. The Democrats have engineered it that way.


#20

Yes, well, one person’s reasonable and neccessary re-drawing of the electoral boundaries (based on population changes) is another person’s gerrymandering.

And I’m sure to a Republican voter, it’s always the Democrats who are gerrymandering.

And I’m sure to a Democrat voter, it’s always the Republicans who are gerrymandering.


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