What is the meaning of Mar and Chor titles?


#1

I have come across the prenoms Mar and Chor in the titles of some of the clergy of some of the Oriental Churches. What do these mean?


#2

I’m no Syriac expert but I believe Mar means Lord, and so would be similar to calling a bishop Kyr, or His Lordship, or Monsignor.


#3

I have always thoguht that Mar/Mor means Saint. The bishops take a saint’s name- sometimes that comes with the position

Chor means Chorepiscopa- it depends on the Church I think. Kind of like a lesser-auxiliary bishop but not quite? The Jacobites have it as a little more than an honorific but in the Syro-Malankara I think they are closer to bishops. Chorepiscopa can wear the Massaanopsa -the veil which the Syriac bishops wear on the head analogous to the mitre of the West.


#4

Mar (Western Syrian Mor) is "Lord, Maran (Moran) is Our Lord.

Many saints are refered as Mar(i) “My lord.”

Chor (Arabic Khury/Khoury) is the chorbishop, which became the usually title in Arabic for Priest (his wife is khuriyah, khuriyyi)


#5

Chor means rural or country.

History
Chorepiscopi are first mentioned by Eusebius in the second century.[1] In the beginning the chorepiscopi seem to have exercised all episcopal functions in their rural districts, but from the second half of the third century they were subject to the city or metropolitan bishops. The Synod of Ancyra (314) specifically forbade them to ordain deacons or priests. The Council of Sardica (343) decreed that no chorepiscopus should be consecrated where a priest would suffice, and so the chorepiscopi in the Byzantine Church gradually disappeared.[2] In the Western Church they were treated as an auxiliary bishop, as a rule having no fixed territory or see of their own. They gradually disappeared as an office and were replaced by archdeacons to administer subdivisions of a diocese.
**
Present practice**
Both Catholic and Orthodox Eastern Churches still have chorbishops. In some Eastern Orthodox Churches, “chorbishop” is an alternate name for an auxiliary bishop. For the Melkite Greek Catholic Church[2] and other Eastern Catholic Churches, chorbishop is an honorific similar to monsignor.

The Churches of the Syriac tradition, namely the Syriac Orthodox Church, the Assyrian Church of the East, the Syrian Catholic Church, the Chaldean Catholic Church, the Indian Orthodox Church, the Syro-Malabar Church, the Syro-Malankara Catholic Church, the Malankara Jacobite Syriac Orthodox Church also preserve the office, calling it corepiscopa or coorepiscopa. In these churches, the corepiscopa vests almost identically to the bishop and often serves as his representative to various liturgical events to add solemnity.

In the Maronite Church, a chorbishop is similar to but not identical to an auxiliary bishop. Like a bishop, a chorbishop is ordained, and may wear a bishop’s vestments including the mitre (hat) and crozier (staff).[3] A Maronite chorbishop has the power to confer minor orders (reader and the subdiaconate), but not the diaconate or priesthood.[4] The role of protosyncellus (vicar general) is often filled by a chorbishop.


#6

Both Catholic and Orthodox Eastern Churches still have chorbishops. In some Eastern Orthodox Churches, “chorbishop” is an alternate name for an auxiliary bishop

I have yet to meet any Orthodox prelates who have the title “chorbishop” or “chorepiscopos”, or see any Orthodox jurisdiction that uses the term.


#7

We instead have Mitered Archpriests, who vest as a priest, but wear a bishop’s miter.


#8
             **The  Corbishop**

             The meaning of his name is “the bishop of the villages and suburbs,” or better, “the delegate of the bishop to the suburbs.” A good priest may be elected among the priests and ordained for this ministry. He is on the rank of “masters” according to the celestial structure of the angels. The bishop gives him the mandate to visit the suburbs and villages out of the metropolitan area anytime he wants. In the old times it was permitted for him to bless the lectors and the sub-deacons in these villages and suburb areas, but that was suspended in the Council of Chalcedon (451). His duty is to presents to the bishop the names of the candidates for the priesthood and diaconate. He assists the bishop and helps him when needed.
             The Corbishop ministered also, through history, the office of the “Visitor- Periadota,” where he was the delegate of the bishop or the Patriarch for one specific mission, and upon his arrival he used to present a report to his delegate (Patriarch or bishop). He is installed on the rank of the “Powers” of the celestial structure of the angels. One of the priests may be elected who is known by his fear of God, he judges things in justice, and never accepts bribes. The bishop allows him to visit and remodel the churches and rebuilds the ruined ones, collecting financial aid for the Patriarchate or bishopric.  Our Lord served himself as Corbishop when he sent his disciples in groups of two to every village and town.

http://kaldu.org/2007/12_Dec/weeklynews_Dec07_07_E2.html


#9

Mar/Mor is used as to mean saint but I think the actual translation is Lord. For example Mar Basilous is St. Basil the Great. In East Syriac, it’s Mar while in West Syriac, it’s Mor. Replacing the O and with the A is found in a few other words such as Qurbana/Qurbano.

A Chor-episcopa/Chor-bishop is not a bishop per se since he was never elevated to the episcopate. I think the closest thing in the Western church is the title of Monsignor.


#10

A Chor-episcopa/Chor-bishop is not a bishop per se since he was never elevated to the episcopate. I think the closest thing in the Western church is the title of Monsignor.

We recently had two men in the Chaldean Western US eparchy ordained, one as Corbishop, the other as Archdeacon.

The funny thing about this is that in the ordination, neither the first one is a Bishop, nor the second one a Deacon. They are both Priests! :smiley: In fact, in the Chaldean Church, an Archdeacon is higher than a Corbishop! :whacky:

God bless,

Rony


#11

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.