What is the proper procedure when taking and after taking Communion?

Here is what I do (or think I should be doing). I walk up to the priest or the layman who is distributing the Eucharist. After he/she proclaims “The body of Christ” I respond with an “amen” as I bow my head and raise my cupped hands so that he/she may place the Eucharist there. I place the bread in my mouth and begin to chew. As I chew, I step to the side, do a sign-of-the-cross, and walk back to my seat. I then pray (if time permits) three of the Lord’s Prayers, three Hail Mary’s, and 3 Glory Be’s.

First of all, is the procedure I described here something that I should continue doing? If not, then what is the proper procedure. By the way, I am of the Roman Rite. I thank you all in advance.

When I’m walking up I say the Prayer Before Communion. Then I say Amen. Take the Eucharist in my right hand with my left one under it. Then I use my left hand to place it in my mouth and I bless myself as I walk back to my seat and I say the Prayer After Communion as I’m walking back.

At my church most everyone bows before their Lord first, then cups the left hand in the right hand to receive Him. Then we remove the Host with the right hand and consume it. Making the sign of the cross is usually done, although, if receiving both forms, it is sometimes done after receiving the Precious Blood. I personally prefer to bow and receive on the tongue if I am receiving from a deacon or priest, after which, I make the sign of the cross.

[quote=ScrupulousMonk] Here is what I do (or think I should be doing). I walk up to the priest or the layman who is distributing the Eucharist. After he/she proclaims “The body of Christ” I respond with an “amen” as I bow my head and raise my cupped hands so that he/she may place the Eucharist there. I place the bread in my mouth and begin to chew. As I chew, I step to the side, do a sign-of-the-cross, and walk back to my seat. I then pray (if time permits) three of the Lord’s Prayers, three Hail Mary’s, and 3 Glory Be’s.

First of all, is the procedure I described here something that I should continue doing? If not, then what is the proper procedure. By the way, I am of the Roman Rite. I thank you all in advance.
[/quote]

I recommend try the ordinary method by receiving in your mouth while on your knees.

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Before I take communion I just my Guardian Angel to be with me, I ask the angels to bring the crumbs of the Holy Body back to the Chalice. In line, I keep a prayerful pose, hands in prayer focusing on what I am about to take.

I bow before I take communion. If there was a person in front of me, I bow while they take communion. I prefer taking communion by tongue, as I am scared of crumbs being left in my hands ( that has happened multiple times). I only take by the hand if I am sick. Once I receive it by tongue, go to the side and make the sign of the cross. And if both species are offered, I line up for the Blood as well then return to my pew and go back to kneeling and start praying. I do not chew the Eucharist, I just let it melt in my mouth, the Precious Blood helps it melt faster.

I pray in general thanksgiving for this wonderful Sacrament, and just adore the Lord in the Eucharist. I sit down after communion is done and when the Eucharist is placed back in the Tabernacle.

I have seen people do that. I would love to do that but given my circumstance (pregnant), I might just fall or injure myself or bump the priest or minister. LOL.

im a hardo. i will make anyone do it. it’s my right and i don’t need to be carrying around particles of our lord.

But, that wasn’t the question…and any way both are acceptable methods of receiving.

It is not bread!

You are fine, and no further adjustments are needed. :slight_smile:

Nothing wrong with what you are doing.

That’s perfectly acceptable. No need to change anything.

To ALL

Judging by the answers I am receiving here, I take it that the Church (or any rite for that matter) does not regulate the procedure for taking the Eucharist. After all, it seems like you were giving your own opinion of what is proper procedure rather than telling me what the Church decrees. Is my assumption correct or is there, indeed, a “right way” as prescribed by the Church (or at least the Roman rite)?

To Elizium23

Pardon me. I forgot the Eucharist is no longer bread after it has been consecrated.

We are to make a sign of reverence (the bow) and the proper response is “Amen”. Beyond that, the Church does not “regulate” or have a “procedure”. You are free to receive the Eucharist on the tongue or in the hand.

In the US the norm is to receive standing.

You can say whatever prayers you want to.

Beyond sign of reverence and response of Amen, there isn’t any “procedure”.

Have you gotten professional help for your OCD and scrupulosity yet? This is another manifestation-- the idea that you could be doing it “wrong” and the need to get multiple opinions, and then as in this post to doubt those responses.

I can’t say it any more plainly: Get Professional Help

I think I see your point. When the practice was first introduced back in the 70’s, it took three separate sermons to demonstrate exactly how it was to be done, including footwork, angle of hands, etc. I have not seen any followups in any parish, so I would expect some deviation from the original instructions. I don’t want to comment further until I’ve actually seen some videos.

Although the consecrated bread is now the body, blood, soul and divinity of Christ under the appearance of bread, that is a little long to say in each post concerning the Eucharistic specie. St Paul writes in 1 Co 11:26

For whenever you eat this bread and drink this cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes

I would say it is acceptable short hand to use the expression bread when we all know what is being described.

OTOH I know some priests who want us to call the ‘bread’ and ‘wine’ respectively the ‘body’ and ‘blood’ even though we know that the bread is body AND blood AND soul AND divinity as is the consecrated wine.

[quote=blujazz25] Quote:

Originally Posted by aTraditionalist

I recommend try the ordinary method by receiving in your mouth while on your knees.

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I have seen people do that. I would love to do that but given my circumstance (pregnant), I might just fall or injure myself or bump the priest or minister. LOL.
[/quote]

Congratulations are in order! Maybe talk to the priest and work out something from the front row. At the least, receive while standing. The photographs I’ve seen from Vatican masses have the priests distributing the Eucharist on the tongue. It is the ordinary and preferred method of the Church. Which may explain why posts are constantly deleted without explanation.

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As someone who has the privilege of distributing the Eucharist, I can tell you that the variations are many. There is of course the prescribed right hand under left; there are the “mid-air snatch and grabs;” there are the V-shaped hands where it is unclear just which hand is the safest to use; there are the teenage girls (always teenage girls) whose palms are 80% under a sweater sleeve; there are the folks who choose to receive on the tongue but who open their mouths so little that a dental tool couldn’t get in there, and there’s no tongue to be seen; and there are the pop-it-in-the-mouth folks. And there are more besides…

I genuflect before the priest holding up the body of christ. I say “amen” and go back to my pew, kneeling until the ciborium is reposed back in the tabernacle (if the tabernacle is within the sanctuary) or sitting after I swallow the Body of Christ. (if the tabernacle is outside the sanctuary.)

You forgot about those who when you go to place the host on their tongue, grap it with their teeth. And the worst of all are the slurpers, who wrap their lips around you fingers as you place the host. What do you do with your wet fingers after being slurped? See, even some people who receive on the tongue do it all wrong.

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