What is the Tridentine Mass? FAQs


#1

http://www.latinmass.org/IMAGES/newbanner.gif

What is the Tridentine Mass?

It’s the Mass used in the Catholic Church for almost 1500 years, until the introduction of the Mass of Pope Paul VI following the Second Vatican Council.

Why is it called the Tridentine Mass?

Because it was codified by the Council of Trent in the 16th century. But the Mass itself is far older than that. The Canon, or central part, of the Mass dates back to the time of St Gregory in the sixth century.

In 1570, Pope St Pius V - in his Papal Bull *Quo Primum *- said that priests could use the Tridentine rite forever, “without scruple of conscience or fear of penalty”.

Wasn’t the Tridentine Mass banned?

No, but following the Second Vatican Council, its public use was restricted by most Bishops.

After the introduction of Pope Paul VI’s new Mass, the only priests given permission to say the Tridentine Mass publicly were priests of England and Wales, thanks to an indult (or permission) granted by the Vatican to Cardinal Heenan of Westminster.

Other priests - such as Blessed Padre Pio and Blessed Josemaria Escriva, the founder of Opus Dei - continued to use the old Mass privately in preference to the new rite.

What’s the advantage of the Tridentine Mass?

One of the great strengths of the Tridentine Mass is its uniformity. Wherever Catholics go in the world, the Tridentine Mass is exactly the same. The movements and gestures of the Mass are clearly prescribed, so there’s no room for “personalisation” of the liturgy. And the time-honoured Latin of the Mass reverently reflects the sacrificial nature of the celebration.

Didn’t the Second Vatican Council forbid Latin Masses?

Not at all. The Council, in its Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy, said: “The use of the Latin language is to be preserved”. The Council merely gave permission for the limited introduction of the vernacular (or local language) into certain parts of the Mass when celebrated in public.

Does the Pope approve of the Tridentine Mass?

Certainly. In his 1980 letter to the Bishops on the Holy Eucharist, Pope John Paul II said: “There are also those people who, having been educated on the basis of the old liturgy in Latin, experience the lack of this ‘one language’, which in all the world was an expression of the unity of the Church and which, through its dignified character, elicited a profound sense of the Eucharistic mystery. It is therefore necessary to show, not only understanding, but also full respect towards these sentiments and desires. As far as possible, these sentiments and desires are to be accommodated.”

So are Catholics entitled to attend a Tridentine Mass if they wish?

Yes. In 1988, Pope John Paul II issued his binding instruction Ecclesia Dei Adflicta. The Pope ordered: “Respect must everywhere be shown for the feelings of all those who are attached to the Latin liturgical tradition by a wide and generous application of the directives already issued by the Apostolic See.”

This instruction grants a privilege to Catholics under Canon Law. Cardinal Mayer, the former head of the Vatican Commission Ecclesia Dei, said the Pope had spoken of the “lawfulness” of the Tridentine Mass and of the “legitimate aspiration” of Catholics to celebrate or attend that Mass. “Hence a privilege in the canonical sense of the term was granted to the faithful by the supreme legislator of the Church,” said Cardinal Mayer. “Once a privilege is duly granted, the subject indeed has the right to benefit from it.”

to read more here


#2

Anybody heard of any upcoming talks with Pope Benedict and the P X Society ?


#3

it is as it was said. destroy the mass and you destroy the church. (luther). the mass is the unbloody sacrifice of christ on the altar. it is the sacrificial rite of the catholic church.
at the time of consecration christ is present, body, blood, soul and divinity under the appearances of bread and wine.
the mass is a series of prayers, instructions and rememberances
culminating in the thanksgiving after communion.
it is not necessary for you to know the words of the mass. it is more important for one to know what is going on and why.
if some-one can give a better answer, do it.
all this individual can say i that god smiled on me and my family.


#4

I picked “other” because although we do have one Indult in our Diocese, geographically it’s rather large (10 counties,over 6,000 square miles). I’ve never heard him speak of it, but at least he did allow it. (Bless You Bishop Mengeling!).


#5

[quote=Steve Green]Anybody heard of any upcoming talks with Pope Benedict and the P X Society ?
[/quote]

I doubt any major talks are going to happen unless the two main points as laid down by Bishop Fellay happen.

On the other hand, the Society Pilgrimage Company is planning a pilgrimage to Italy and the ad stated that it included a papal audiance. :whistle:


#6

I voted “I don’t know”, because I don’t know how the Bishop of my diocese feels about the Tridentine Mass. I do know that there is no Tridentine Mass available anywhere in my state.

What I don’t understand, is – why was it ever restricted after Vatican II?

(Excuse me if I seem ignorant; I am a “revert”, and “missed” Vatican II).


Crazy Internet Junkie Society
****Carrier of the Angelic Sparkles Sprinkle Bag


#7

Thank you, Gloria! You answered so many good questions with that referenced site!

I am a cradle Catholic, and can remember when the reforms began after Vatican II. I love the new Mass, and I love the Latin Mass too. In my Parish, often our Pastor will announce, “Today I will do the Eucharistic Prayer in Latin”. It is, I think, good for all of us to be reminded of the beauty of the “language of the Church”.


#8

Our Archbishop has granted and indult Mass at a Chapel. The Chapel only holds about 250 people and is full every Sunday. It would be nice to see a Traditional Parish and then I would know for sure if he supports the Tridentine Mass.


#9

It is the most beautiful act this side of heaven . . . .


#10

[quote=A.Pelliccio]It is the most beautiful act this side of heaven . . . .
[/quote]

Ditto, at least the high mass is, the low mass has the reverence, but the mystery is emphasized more at high mass.


#11

[quote=A.Pelliccio]It is the most beautiful act this side of heaven . . . .
[/quote]

As is any form of Catholic Mass. I’m sure you meant to add that too.


#12

My bishop hates the Traditional Latin Mass. He allows a weekly (every Tuesday evening at 7pm) Mass only because he was “forced” to by Cardinal Hoyos. Attendance is usually 40-60 souls.

We are not allowed to advertise the Mass in any way, nor is any mention of it allowed in the diocesan newspaper.

Heck, even our local secular newspaper has carried three articles on it - with pictures, no less!

In Manibus Dei,

  • Mike

BTW, I live in the Lafayette (Indiana) diocese, and my bishop is William Higi (yes, the same Higi who was reprimanded by the Holy See for allowing priests to refuse Holy Communion to those who knelt to receive It).


#13

**Do you have links to the articles? **

I was told that our bishop was reprimanded too.


#14

Bishop Brom here in San Diego seems OK with the Traditional Mass. I had heard that he was opposed to it but he has attended many times and actually celebrated a few. Maybe I’m wrong but he seems to have an appreciation for it.


#15

My Bishop hasn’t granted the tridentine mass to be said in my parish, thank God. All this talk about bringing the old mass back is garbage. Stop Living in the past and stay with the New Mass(Have you ever thought that God wanted reform during the 2nd vatican council?)

podo2005


#16

Why are you so hostile? Why do you hate the Traditional Mass so much? Why are you opposed to those who want to worship God the way they always had? While I agree God probably wanted change, I don’t think he wanted destruction.


#17

[quote=Podo2005]My Bishop hasn’t granted the tridentine mass to be said in my parish, thank God. All this talk about bringing the old mass back is garbage. Stop Living in the past and stay with the New Mass(Have you ever thought that God wanted reform during the 2nd vatican council?)

podo2005
[/quote]

Garbage? Why are you so hostile? What are you afraid of? Why are you threatened by those who worship at the Traditional Mass? Why do you think we live in the past? God is eternal, and the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass is also eternal. Just because it is old doesn’t make it wrong, anymore than just because it is new makes it right. I never thought I would hear someone speak the way you did. So I guess I can only repeat the old traditionalist credo, even though I thought I never would:

WE ARE WHAT YOU WERE
IF WE ARE WRONG NOW YOU WERE WRONG THEN
IF YOU WEREN’T WRONG THEN, HOW CAN WE BE WRONG NOW


#18

archbishop Brunett allows one in seattle, but he persoanlly prefers the Novus Ordo. He feels that too may tridentine era priests just mumbled though the canon and dindt know what they were saying, and so NO is better because they know what they are saying.


#19

[quote=Podo2005]My Bishop hasn’t granted the tridentine mass to be said in my parish, thank God. All this talk about bringing the old mass back is garbage. Stop Living in the past and stay with the New Mass(Have you ever thought that God wanted reform during the 2nd vatican council?)

podo2005
[/quote]

Thank you for adding nothing to this thread.


#20

[quote=Brain]archbishop Brunett allows one in seattle, but he persoanlly prefers the Novus Ordo. He feels that too may tridentine era priests just mumbled though the canon and dindt know what they were saying, and so NO is better because they know what they are saying.
[/quote]

Just for informational purposes, the Priests actually know what the Latin in the Mass says, the same as the congregation. The reason for this is that the Missals have the vernacular translation side by side with the Latin in most cases. Since the Priests have college degrees, I have to assume that they can read. I would also imagine that they would have studied the canon of the Mass prior to actually celebrating the Mass.

If the reason you gave is the Bishops official position, then it is an excuse and nothing more.


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.