What is typology?


#1

What is typology? How is it used or where can I find more information out about it?


#2

The study of typing errors. (typo greek for typing error] + logy greek logos meaning to study])


#3

Typology is nothing more than a foreshadowing or prefiguring. As in the Old Testament prefigures or foreshadows events in the New Testament. The study of such biblical foreshadowing is called “typology” (see CCC, nn. 123-130).


#4

[quote=DVIN CKS]Typology is nothing more than a foreshadowing or prefiguring. As in the Old Testament prefigures or foreshadows events in the New Testament. The study of such biblical foreshadowing is called “typology” (see CCC, nn. 123-130).
[/quote]

:thumbsup:

Types in Scripture

“the definition of the type is … a person, a thing, or an action, having its own independent and absolute existence, but at the same time intended by God to prefigure a future person, thing, or action.”

The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume XV
Copyright © 1912 by Robert Appleton Company


#5

[quote=Scott_Lafrance]The study of typing errors. (typo greek for typing error] + logy greek logos meaning to study])
[/quote]

Do you mean, typographical error? Like the kind of typos I make all the time on this forum?


#6

Yet death reigned from Adam to Moses, even over those whose sins were not like the transgression of Adam, who was a type of the one who was to come.
Romans 5:14

The fulfillment of the type is the antitype. Jesus is the New Adam that is prefigured by Adam.

Adam = type
New Adam (Jesus) = antitype

Eve = type
New Eve (Mary) = antitype


#7

Thanks for the help. From what I understand… it is similar between something future and something past and this similarity is intended, and not a matter of chance resemblance. Is this correct?


#8

St. Thomas tells us that because God is the author of all being, He can use people and events themselves as symbols, while we humans are limited to using symbols to signify other things.

Thus, I would agree that the Church teaches that types were intended by the divine author of scripture.

Here’s a practical example of Joseph being a type of Christ:

Jacob’s son Joseph was betrayed by his brothers, he was taken away and presumed dead. He was falsely accused of crimes. Ultimately he was given a reprieve by the Pharoah and rose up to sit at the right hand of the Pharoah.

His brothers left Canaan and met him later in Egypt but, believing he had died, they didn’t recognize him. After putting them through a test, they recognized him through his mercy. He forgave the sins of his brothers and was reunited with his father Jacob on his chariot of gold.


#9

[quote=Scott_Lafrance]The study of typing errors. (typo greek for typing error] + logy greek logos meaning to study])
[/quote]

:rotfl:


#10

Years ago, I read the Bible cover-to-cover and was unimpressed. But then I remembered that in high school a teacher had mentioned “types.” I wondered in that was what I was missing. I searched for organized expressions of reliable rules of typology within our faith, but found none. So, I developed my own, with careful re-reading of the Bible, borrowing Protestant ideas when they made sense and did not conflict with our faith.

To think about and talking about types, I had to develop a new vocabulary. As you can see in the Catholic Encyclopedia definition posted above, types are

“the definition of the type is … a person, a thing, or an action, having its own independent and absolute existence, but at the same time intended by God to prefigure a future person, thing, or action.”

with the consequence that I divided types into two groups…“Types,” or WORDS describing things symbolizing an aspect of the salvation process; and “Word Pictures,” or PEOPLE or ACTION in the Bible symbolizing an aspect of the salvation process.

There is a “vocabulary” in the Bible of about 5 dozen types, with standardized definitions. “Boat” and all boat-like things in the Bible, for example, always = “the Church.” The “abyss” and all large bodies of water as well as salty or poison water always = “the sea of damnable souls.” All non-fig trees and pieces of non-fig trees always somehow = “the cross.”

Again, the definitions are standardized – they do not vary from book to book.

These types are the building blocks of “word pictures” in the Bible. These are frequently deeply clever. In Judges 7, for example, note that Gideon’s soldiers defeat the “bad guys” by smashing clay jars containing torches. Clay jars = “mortal man.” “Torches” = Fire Type = “a special presence of God.” So, note: We have “a special presence of God,” INSIDE “mortal man.”

And then soldiers smash the mortal man, exposing the light of the special presence of God.

Have you figured it out yet?

The clay jars with fire inside are mortal Christ with a “special presence of God” in Him – the Incarnation!

And just as Christ was killed by soldiers, Gideon’s jars are smashed by soldiers.

And just as killing Christ turned out to be a good thing, releasing God’s power in a way that defeated evil, smashing Gideon’s jars was a good thing, exposing the firing within and defeating the bad guys.

In other words, the story of Gideon versus the Midianites is not a Bible war story.

That the battle is part of the history of Israel is not very important.

What is important is that the evil-defeating killing of Christ is foreshadowed.

The Eucharist is also pre-figured in Judges 7. Can anyone here see where?


#11

I also have questions about this. Does anyone know of an actual book(s) that lays out many of these prefigurements/types?


#12

[quote=Newvert]I also have questions about this. Does anyone know of an actual book(s) that lays out many of these prefigurements/types?
[/quote]

Pathways in Scripture by Damasus Winzen

Making Sense out of Scripture by Mark Shea

Salvation is From the Jews by Roy Schoeman

The City of God by St. Augustine

The first book is a great place to start.


#13

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