What is Wrong?


#21

Oh, I definately will. I love a good read, and I like Ralph Martin. And I’m a Carmelite at heart. Almost became a secular discalced Carmelite many years ago.


#22

I did talk to a priest about it last week. He encouraged me to try to be more disciplined by saying vocal prayers.


#23

Is it possible to get a long-term spiritual director who will not change? Behind every saint is a spiritual director.


#24

I don’t know about you, but as I’ve gotten older, especially past 40, I’ve actually felt similarly. My mother has told me for years and years that she thinks I have ADD. I recently got an audiobook on ADD after watching “The Abundant Life” on EWTN when they interviewed a dr. who specialized in ADD. I’m pretty sure I have it after I listened to it. Why it’s gotten worse as I got older, though, I’m not sure. However, if and until I get it diagnosed, I’m not going to rely on my own diagnosis.

According to Dr. Hallowell, ADD basically resembles stresses from everyday life and can (and often does) include other psychological disorders such as depression, dsylexia, bipolar disorder, etc… Some symptoms that I show in an exaggerated way is distraction to the point of doing nothing. I know I need to get things done but I just can’t do them. He goes on to explain the ADD patient doesn’t do or not do things because they don’t want to, but because they just can’t. Also, he explains the medical evidence to support that it is truly a medical condition.

It’s a wonderful book, but of course it would be meaningless to read it if you didn’t think you had ADD.


#25

The more I think about it, the better I think I can articulate it.

I feel like I am waiting for something. I’m afraid to do anything b/c I’m afraid I’ll get distracted and will miss something.


#26

Interesting. My sister was dx’ed with ADD a few years ago. Never thought I had it though - especially since this seems to tie in with my Catholicity.


#27

Well, I go to the same few priests for confession and get a little direction that way. I’ve never had a formal director. I could get one though - I know they offer it. It’s just a matter of having the time and opportunity which is going to be tricky but would probably be worth trying.

How ofter does one go to a director? Weekly? Monthly?


#28

May I suggest using Saint Peter Chrysologus as your spiritual director (see the second short excerpt below–in blue–and the link to his sermon on this subject)…not to ignore your suffering and needs…but, prayer, mortification (fasting by denying our self even the smallest things we do/like…food too but much broader in scope) and almsgiving (acts of mercy) always helps me…nothing drastic…its not an end unto itself…but it is really a means or form of penance for personal sins…it draws us out of “self” into “The Other” (God’s love and mercy) and into “the other” (our suffering neighbor). Catechism of Catholic Church #1434CCC #1434 The interior penance of the Christian can be expressed in many and various ways. Scripture and the Fathers insist above all on three forms, fasting, prayer, and almsgiving,31 which express conversion in relation to oneself, to God, and to others. Alongside the radical purification brought about by Baptism or martyrdom they cite as means of obtaining forgiveness of sins: effort at reconciliation with one’s neighbor, tears of repentance, concern for the salvation of one’s neighbor, the intercession of the saints, and the practice of charity "which covers a multitude of sins."32

Prayer, Fasting and Mercy -
St. Peter Chrysologus

**[FONT=Arial][size=2][FONT=Arial]**One of the greatest preachers of the early church explains the key penitential practices of Lent-[size=3]**prayer, fasting, and almsgiving or mercy **[/size]. Saint Peter Chrysologus declares that Prayer knocks at the door,…fasting obtains,…mercy receives. He shows how prayer, mercy and fasting are one, and they give life to each other. This reading is used by the Roman Catholic Church for the Office of Readings for Tuesday of the 3rd week of Lent and it excerpted from Sermo 43: PL 52, 320, 322. ***St. Peter Chrysologus was the bishop of Ravenna, Italy in the middle of the 5th century. His sermons were so inspiring that he was given the title “Chrysologus” (greek for "Golden-worded) and was eventually declared a “Doctor of the Church.”

***[/FONT][/size][/FONT]crossroadsinitiative.com/library_article/408/Prayer__Fasting_and_Mercy___St._Peter_Chrysologus.html

Lastly, may I recommend using the psalms (extensively)…praying them in the voice of the psalmist…really the voice of Jesus – the Word Made Flesh – to address your own suffering and issues…but most importantly to address the suffering and needs all your brothers and sisters in Christ.

I am positive that Our Lord will bless you abundantly and help you through your pains and suffering…you are in my prayers.

Pax Christi


#29

A spiritual director is not necessarily your confessor. You need to be able to sit down with him/her face to face to discuss things. I’d say meet at least once a month.


#30

I think you are being called to a spiritual life of more and fuller devotion - and oh yes, you are still running away. Afraid of answering the call? You need to do two things here. First, have a full and no-holds-barred conversation with a priest. This time, try and LISTEN and HEAR what the priest is telling to you - not what you THINK he is saying… You do need sometime all alone for an interior self examination and recollection. Find out what you really want. Be very open to the leadings of the Holy Spirit during this recollection - you will definitely learn a thing or two about what you should.

Secondly and more imporantly, do not reduce your praye/devotion time. If the desire to pray is really from the spirit and genuine, there is nothing you could do about it. this is because the more you deny this call, the more restless you will be - and so your soul will keep on searching, wanting more, until it rests in its destined place. PRAY MORE AND SPEAK TO A PRIEST. You will surely get an answer. Egodi.


#31

Ok, maybe I didn’t explain that quite right.

What I mean by I’m afraid to do anything is that I’m afraid to do anything ordinary b/c I feel like I’ll be distracted from whatever it is I’m doing interiorly/mentally/spiritually. I feel like I am avoiding practical daily works b/c I’m waiting on something else. I think if I just go about my daily routine I will get absorbed and lose whatever this mindfulness (or mindlessness) is that I feel I have to do (or not do… :whacky: )


#32

This all seems very interesting and attractive. I’ll take a deep consideration of it, thank you.


#33

Umm, I feel it necessary to tell you that Saint Peter Chrysologous cannot be your spiritual director because he is not someone with whom you can sit down face to face and have a conversation. He can be your patron saint, however, if you want.


#34

That may be. It’s just hard to believe that would be the case with someone with as weak a faith as mine, or as sinful a life.

Afraid of answering the call? You need to do two things here. First, have a full and no-holds-barred conversation with a priest. This time, try and LISTEN and HEAR what the priest is telling to you - not what you THINK he is saying… You do need sometime all alone for an interior self examination and recollection. Find out what you really want. Be very open to the leadings of the Holy Spirit during this recollection - you will definitely learn a thing or two about what you should.

Secondly and more imporantly, do not reduce your praye/devotion time. If the desire to pray is really from the spirit and genuine, there is nothing you could do about it. this is because the more you deny this call, the more restless you will be - and so your soul will keep on searching, wanting more, until it rests in its destined place. PRAY MORE AND SPEAK TO A PRIEST. You will surely get an answer. Egodi.

Thanks. I’ll try to make an appointment.


#35

That was what I gathered he meant. I used to pray to Padre Pio for direction :thumbsup:


#36

Padre Pio is so awesome.


#37

He absolutely is.


#38

Well, it supposedly an inherited trait, so you never know. :wink:


#39

I think you suffer from a form of Acedia… which is in fact a demon.
I suffer greatly from this affliction, in my day to day life, I call it the “I don’t wanna’s.” Before I found the Catholic faith , the “I don’t wanna’s” were so over powering that I didn’t want to live, what is the point of life, I don’t want to do anything all this menial work day after day. I was also suffering from spiritual acedia at the time, though I was a Christian my prayer life and spiritual devotion times were nearly non existant. I did not feel God in my life and I begged Him to show me the way or I honestly thought I would kill myself or go completely insane.

But by the Grace of God I found the name of the affliction acedia, and by learning that I found my way to Catholicism.
Now after a heavy religious experience I am drawn to the Church much the way you describe, almost in a hypnotic sort of way. I desire so strongly to go to Mass everyday, adore the Blessed Sacrament, and constantly pray. Though I have not had my first communion, I hunger for it GREATLY. I feel that receiving it daily or frequently would be the best thing that I could do to bring meaning to my life and the endurance I need to run the race.

In my times spent adoring the Blessed Sacrament I have gone away feeling filled the Holy Spirit ready to boldly proclaim the good news of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. But then a few days go by and I feel this boldness waning and so I crave my time with the Lord constantly.

So what I am trying to say is, there is nothing wrong with wanting to do nothing but spend all your time in prayer/adoration/mass. What you are doing there is spending time with our Creator and therein lies the true meaning and purpose of life. The person who compared you to Mary vs Martha is correct. You have chosen the good part and will find your way from there. Stick with your spiritual life as you feel called and you will see your earthly life fall into order.

Read Luke 10:41 and 14:26. And pray the Divine Office!


#40

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.