What makes ex-Catholics so anti-Catholic?


#1

I do not understand how former cradle Catholics can so turn against the Church and agree with all the anti-Catholic lies? I guess the answer is severe Catholic apologetics.:confused:


#2

In the case of my mother and father it was bad priests. Priests were mean, rude and very disrespectful to them when they were trying to get married. (One is in Prison now for child abuse).

This makes it that much harder for them to accept that I am Catholic.


#3

I think there are as many reasons as there are fallen away Catholics. As a convert it really makes me sad.


#4

“There are not a hundred people in America who hate the Catholic Church. There are millions of people who hate what they wrongly believe to be the Catholic Church— which is, of course, quite a different thing.” - Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen


#5

It’s because they are trying to justify their" wrong "decision and people like Jack chick give them ammunition.


#6

In most cases, yes. However, there may be other reasons.


#7

Pride, imho. My dad was an ex-Catholic. He determined that he was the sole arbiter of what was good for him and what wasn’t and no one, much less a ‘Church led by senile, celibate, isolated old men who haven’t a clue about life in the real world’ was going to tell him any different.

imho, those who leave the Church have decided to do something contrary to the teachings of the Church and obstinately want their own way. They cannot ever admit the Church is right because that would mean they are wrong. Therefore, they convince themselves that the Church is wrong.

They knew the Truth and they rejected it. If they ever admit that it is the Truth, they will have to humble themselves and they don’t want to do that. Their pride demands that they attack the Church, so as to continue to convince themselves that She is wrong.


#8

I think a lot of it is just questions and things they have trouble understanding.

Therefore they find a way to have a religion if any at all that fits their lifestyle and choices.

They try to do anything that makes them feel less guilty.

I’ve commonly heard people say even some friends that the Catholic Church and traditions puts the biggest guilt trip on people and catholic followers and living a true catholic lifestyle is extremely hard especially in today’s secular mainstream society in America.

I couldn’t agree more with them. Where I don’t agree is altering our beliefs to suite our lifestyle and to ease guilt and bad choices which many anti-catholics or ex Christians do. I believe that we ought to be guilty because we are sinners and we are nothing compared to the life Jesus lived and performed. We should be guilty and acknowledge our sins. It’s even healthier to do that to live better happier lives and to strive for perfection. This is tough for most people even a lot of catholics.

The biggest example:

They may say there is no proof of God or this and that or it’s not in the bible ect. Or that Jesus died for our sins and I believe in him so I am saved and I’m free to sin or at the most confess to God by myself in prayer.

This is why they are so anti catholic because in their mind they think it’s

  1. Old Traditions
  2. A big guilt trip
  3. Corrupt (media focusing on priest accusations, people focusing on church mistakes in history that happened over 500 years ago but fail to focus on the church today)
  4. Contrary to the bible ( because men like Martin Luther who didn’t even live when it was written choose what was true and what wasn’t and what books to leave out and take the faith alone is all you need and you are eternally secured)

but most of the time it’s simply easier to not be a catholic.


#9

It could be that we get annoyed by Catholics who speculate in a condescending and superior manner that we must somehow be morally, mentally, or intellectually infirm because we disagree with them.:hmmm:

Just a thought.


#10

I’ve thought about this question a lot recently. Generally speaking, I think it’s easier for a “convert” to become anti-“whatever they used to be”, whether it’s ex-Catholics, ex-Protestants, ex-atheists, ex-liberals, ex-conservatives, ex-pro-choicers, ex-pro-lifers, ex-overweight people, etc. Pride often dictates that we look with disdain on who we once were and the ideas and practices we used to follow, particularly when we encounter them in others.

I like to call it the “what was I thinking?” mentality. Basically, if we change our mind on something, it is easier to criticize it and dismiss those who still hold to the view we once held. Since our decision to change our beliefs or practices usually comes from additional information (whether factual or experiential), we assume that we have “progressed” when we have changed. So, anyone who still actually believes or practices what we have outgrown must either be severely misinformed (as we once were), severely dense, or both.


#11

This observation touches on an important point. It’s just standard psychology. Whenever there is discontinuity between our beliefs and our behavior, we will not be at peace until we bring them back into harmony. In other words, we either change our behavior to match our beliefs, or change our belief system to match our behavior.

I’m not sure that this entirely explains the OP’s observation that the most hardcore anti-Catholics tend to be ex-Catholics, though it does hint at a possible explanation for some “ex-Catholics”. When I first went to college, many of my dormmates were Catholics who stopped practicing as soon as they got there. They were always pressuring me to drink or do other things, and I think part of the reason was that the way I lived my life was bearing witness to them the fact that the Catholic belief system might actually be correct. If I could live that way, that meant that they could live that way if they really wanted to. And they had already convinced themselves that it was not possible, so why bother trying?

I don’t think there is any one-size-fits-all explanation. As one PP stated, there are probably as many reasons as their are fallen away Catholics.


#12

No, not because you disagree with us, because you have chosen to disagree with God.


#13

That only applies to the ex-Catholics who regularly hang out here at CAF! :wink: :smiley:


#14

Ex-Catholics are very anti - Catholic because they have seen and they have also heared what is right and hence they cannot do the bad things they use to do earlier on without first fighting with their conscience. the more they fight with their conscience, the more prisoners they become and hence the more anti-Catholic they become. :slight_smile:


#15

That’s true. Until I started reading the posts here, I wasn’t anti-Catholic at all.

I didn’t believe it, but I didn’t have problem with people believing it.


#16

The one word that describes so many;ignorance.

As chaz posted,“I think a lot of it is just questions and things they have trouble understanding.” We see this a lot on MB’s where the ‘ex’ is debating knowledgable Catholics. They wo’nt accept the Catholics answer but will agree with anti-Catholic sites and posters who have a distorted view of the Church. They lacked the ability to counter someone who presented a contrary interpetation to doctrine, thereby falling to ‘brainwashing’. Also pride, justifying their choice, and bad experiences with priests or church members (real or imagined), gives them ‘reasons’ in their minds

Again as chaz says-

it’s simply easier to not be a catholic.

Kotton


#17

That’s truly sad. I’m sorry you’ve had such a bad experience here. Many of us can be a bit rough around the edges, but some of us try to discuss things more charitably.

I think it is a mistake to presume that ignorance on the part of ex-Catholics is the primary reason for them leaving the Church. First of all, it places a serious obstacle towards dialogue (as is evident by your experience here). We cannot begin a discussion by assuming a position of intellectual superiority. It tends to be a turnoff for the one being preached at. I think that attitude is symptomatic of the larger culture, though. Knowledge is seen as the solution to everything. It’s the type of attitude that thinks that, if you’re having difficulties or problems, you just haven’t read the right book yet.

Second, it’s not always true that the person is ignorant of Catholic teaching. In some instances, that might be the case, but many times it is not. And then when we throw information at the person, we wonder why they’re not running to their local parish to go to Confession or RCIA. We’re not successful at evangelizing in such cases because we have misdiagnosed the reason the person left the Church.

Anyway, I hope you don’t write off all Catholics, sideline. We certainly make mistakes at times in our zeal to evangelize. Sometimes we forget that there’s a real person at the other end of the computer screen.


#18

I know from personal experience that protestants will give a lot of praise to someone that has escaped the bondage of the Catholic church which can really empower someone to take on their views no matter how educated they were in the teachings of the Church. When you leave a church where you felt like a nobody just sitting in the pew and then get to a church where you are getting all this attention because of your testimony it is real easy to take their side.

I thank God that all my Catholic school education stuck with me since I found myself defending the teachings of the Church when these people approached me trying to agree with me for leaving the Church. This ultimately streangthend my faith and brought me back into Church. I still deal with a lot of these people since my wife is not Catholic(pray for her conversion). Nobody has converted because of me yet but many of them I know have a much different view of the Catholic Church than when i first met them.


#19

Yours are better than average I have to say. I’ve been impressed.

I think it is a mistake to presume that ignorance on the part of ex-Catholics is the primary reason for them leaving the Church. First of all, it places a serious obstacle towards dialogue (as is evident by your experience here). We cannot begin a discussion by assuming a position of intellectual superiority. It tends to be a turnoff for the one being preached at. I think that attitude is symptomatic of the larger culture, though.

I agree. If you do a quick survey of television pundits, you’d think that saying someone is stupid is the same as making an cogent argument.

Knowledge is seen as the solution to everything. It’s the type of attitude that thinks that, if you’re having difficulties or problems, you just haven’t read the right book yet.

I’ve noticed that most people seem to have the delusion that they are rational beings who make their decisions based on logic and a suitable knowledge base. This is rarely the case.

Usually, we jump to a rapid conclusion, gather evidence to support our conclusion, and look for flaws in the arguments of those who say we are wrong (or we just say they are stupid, and save ourselves time). We rarely, if ever, try and assess what mistakes we might be making, or look for evidence to support opinions contrary to our own.

Even those of us who do take a logical and scientific view on one subject will often be completely irrational when it comes to another one. Usually, the more we care about a subject the less rational we become.

Second, it’s not always true that the person is ignorant of Catholic teaching. In some instances, that might be the case, but many times it is not. And then when we throw information at the person, we wonder why they’re not running to their local parish to go to Confession or RCIA. We’re not successful at evangelizing in such cases because we have misdiagnosed the reason the person left the Church.

It’s true that former Catholics aren’t always misinformed about what the Church teaches. It’s also true that being Catholic doesn’t make you well-informed about what the Church teaches. Some of the most annoying arguments I’ve been in are with people who are absolutely clueless about Church teaching. They are wrong about what their Church teaches, but claim that I am misinformed because I don’t agree with them.

I’ve had Catholics tell me I shouldn’t be so ignorant when I told them that the Church held that the Eucharist contained the real presence of Christ. They told me it was just symbolic.

Do a quick survey of some of the posts on this forum by Catholics, and you will find that ignorance abounds inside the Church and without.

Anyway, I hope you don’t write off all Catholics, sideline. We certainly make mistakes at times in our zeal to evangelize. Sometimes we forget that there’s a real person at the other end of the computer screen.

I don’t. I’m fond of my Mom for instance. :love:

I hope I have demonstrated with this post that I ***am ***willing to treat Catholics with the same respect that they treat me.


#20

I believe you have. You made some excellent points. None of us are always as logical as we like to believe! I like the point about being logical in some areas but not in others. We like to believe we are impartial all around, but that’s not always the case.


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