What Makes Someone a Heretic


#1

I understand the definition of a heretic is one who is in obstinate denial of the Catholic faith. So does this only apply to one who simple speaks against the Church, but still, in actuality, accept all of her teachings? What about someone who publically admits to wanting to disagree with the Church, while they still hold to the teaching they want to doubt? Or does heretic refer more to someone's internal beliefs?


#2

[quote="C794, post:1, topic:330472"]
I understand the definition of a heretic is one who is in obstinate denial of the Catholic faith. So does this only apply to one who simple speaks against the Church, but still, in actuality, accept all of her teachings? What about someone who publically admits to wanting to disagree with the Church, while they still hold to the teaching they want to doubt? Or does heretic refer more to someone's internal beliefs?

[/quote]

A heretic is a Catholic Christian, post-baptism, who has openly spoken false doctrine contrary to Catholic teaching, and has refused correction by a Bishop or the Magisterium.

You can talk about errors with others, that doesn't necessarily make you a heretic. You can teach errors, you can be charged with teachng heresy, but that does not make you a heretic.

The only way for someone to fully be declared a heretic is by the authority of the Bishop or the Bishops of the Church.


#3

Basically, you begin as a faithful Catholic, then you are elected to political office. There's not much more to it than that.


#4

[quote="po18guy, post:3, topic:330472"]
Basically, you begin as a faithful Catholic, then you are elected to political office. There's not much more to it than that.

[/quote]

:rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:


#5

[quote="The_GreyPilgrim, post:2, topic:330472"]
A heretic is a Catholic Christian, post-baptism, who has openly spoken false doctrine contrary to Catholic teaching, and has refused correction by a Bishop or the Magisterium.

You can talk about errors with others, that doesn't necessarily make you a heretic. You can teach errors, you can be charged with teachng heresy, but that does not make you a heretic.

The only way for someone to fully be declared a heretic is by the authority of the Bishop or the Bishops of the Church.

[/quote]

Well how does this work with someone being able to earn a latae sentenae excommunication? That would make it seem that someone could be a heretic without the Bishop declaring them as such. Also, how does "obstinate" effect this? Is simply speaking against doctrine enough to make one a heretic; or do they actually have to believe what they're saying? Also, does holding a position that one thinks may violate doctrine make them a heretic? Or would that only apply once they know for sure what the Church taught and then continued with their disagreement?


#6

[quote="C794, post:1, topic:330472"]
I understand the definition of a heretic is one who is in obstinate denial of the Catholic faith. So does this only apply to one who simple speaks against the Church, but still, in actuality, accept all of her teachings? What about someone who publically admits to wanting to disagree with the Church, while they still hold to the teaching they want to doubt? Or does heretic refer more to someone's internal beliefs?

[/quote]

There are infallible teachings and non-infallible teachings.

Rejecting an infallible teaching is both a sin of grave matter and heresy.
Rejecting a non-infallible teaching is a sin of grave matter but not heresy.


#7

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.