What order did Friar Tuck belong to?

Yes, I do realize that Friar Tuck is a fictional character (at least I think he was) but I wanted to know what religious order (if any) did Friar Tuck belong to? or was he a lay brother?

I’ve always enjoyed watching Disney’s Robin Hood

Looks Franciscan to me, but I could be mistaken.

If he was a "lay" (i.e. unvowed) brother, he wouldn't have been called "Friar". He wouldn't have been a Grey Friar (Franciscan) or a Black Friar (Dominican) because these orders weren't founded until the 13th century, and Robin Hood is usually said to have flourished in the late 12th century or even earlier. He may have been (supposed to be) an Austin (Augustinian) Friar, which order was very numerous at the time in England and elsewhere.

always thought he was a Franciscan .

Originally quoted from Petergee

If he was a “lay” (i.e. unvowed) brother, he wouldn’t have been called “Friar”. He wouldn’t have been a Grey Friar (Franciscan) or a Black Friar (Dominican) because these orders weren’t founded until the 13th century, and Robin Hood is usually said to have flourished in the late 12th century or even earlier. He may have been (supposed to be) an Austin (Augustinian)
Friar, which order was very numerous at the time in England and elsewhere

Yes, that makes sense.

Me too.

The oldest references to Robin Hood are not historical records, or even ballads recounting his exploits, but hints and allusions found in various works. From 1228, onwards the names ‘Robinhood’, ‘Robehod’ or ‘Hobbehod’ occur in the rolls of several English Justices. The majority of these references date from the late 13th century. Between 1261 and 1300, there are at least eight references to ‘Rabunhod’ in various regions across England, from Berkshire in the south to York in the north.[24]

The first allusion to a literary tradition of Robin Hood tales occurs in William Langland’s Piers Plowman (c. 1362–c. 1386) in which Sloth, the lazy priest, confesses: “I kan [know] not parfitly [perfectly] my Paternoster as the preest it singeth,/ But I kan rymes of Robyn Hood.”[26]

this is from Wikipedia. I say that since the tale was written when there were Fransican Friars, that Friar Tuck was a Franciscan, even though historically he couldn’t have been.:wink:

[quote="CHRISTINE77, post:6, topic:217336"]
I say that since the tale was written when there were Fransican Friars, that Friar Tuck was a Franciscan, even though historically he couldn't have been.;)

[/quote]

Which gets to the question, when did Friar Tuck enter into the tales of Robin Hood? Presumably, like many legends, the tale grew with time, as new story tellers added new elements. As you suggest, by the time the story was actually written down, Franciscans existed and that may be how Friar Tuck was depicted.

Friar Tuck was most certainly a Franciscan. Couldn’t be anything else.:stuck_out_tongue:

youtube.com/watch?v=4qcN8tGojXY

To add to the mystery, the earliest known instance of Friar Tuck in the Robin Hood tales comes in the ballad "Robin Hood and the Curtal Friar." In it, the friar lives in Fountains Abbey, which was Cistercian. And, of course, Cistercians are monks, not friars. :o

lib.rochester.edu/camelot/teams/curta.htm

Hmmm...good detective work Dale M. He has always, in my mind and in modern representation been a Franciscan. Cistercian? That is interesting.:thumbsup:

[quote="goforgoal, post:5, topic:217336"]
Originally quoted from Petergee

Yes, that makes sense.

Me too.

[/quote]

Me three.

In all the movie versions throughout the years and from what I remember, he is ALWAYS portrayed as Franciscan.

I actually heard that Friar Tuck may have been masquerading as a friar. He certainly wasn't very holy!

I think the reference "friar" may just come down to us from the Norman french "frere" - brother. The "title" of a monk is "brother." Later, it took on a more technical meaning.

[quote="Warrenton, post:13, topic:217336"]
I think the reference "friar" may just come down to us from the Norman french "frere" - brother. The "title" of a monk is "brother." Later, it took on a more technical meaning.

[/quote]

That would explain the confusing reference in the ballad I had mentioned earlier. :thumbsup:

Thank you for taking the time to answer my question.

Did Friar Tuck leave his order? or was he still in the order but ventured off alone?

Favorite Friar Tuck (character)?

[quote="CHRISTINE77, post:12, topic:217336"]
I actually heard that Friar Tuck may have been masquerading as a friar. He certainly wasn't very holy!

[/quote]

:confused: the traditional tales portray him bending the rules a little, but not doing anythiung "unholy"! (Disregard the absolutely awful recent film where he and Maid Marian are portrayed as anachronistic protestants.).

Everything I've read said he was a Franciscan. Although from what I gather the order can change depending on who is telling the story.

I think one had him as a wondering Friar who's order had all but died out. He was the last. Also it should be noted Friar took was ordained a Priest as he could hear confession, perform weddings and celibrate mass

[quote="cyberwolf001, post:17, topic:217336"]

it should be noted Friar took was ordained a Priest as he could hear confession, perform weddings and celibrate mass

[/quote]

The traditional tales (as opposed to modern inventions) do not portray him hearing confessions or saying Mass. They do portray him being the presiding celebrant at a wedding (without a Nuptial Mass), but you only have to be a Deacon to do that, and quite a few friars are and were deacons.

[quote="Petergee, post:16, topic:217336"]
:confused: the traditional tales portray him bending the rules a little, but not doing anythiung "unholy"! (Disregard the absolutely awful recent film where he and Maid Marian are portrayed as anachronistic protestants.).

[/quote]

Here is a link to a site about Robin Hood:
boldoutlaw.com/realrob/realrob3.html

and a quote:
"Most Robin Hood stories these days are set in the era of Richard I. There were no friars in England back then. It doesn't help that the early ballads are set in later times, because Tuck's not in them either. But he does pop up as Frere Tuk in a relatively early fragment of Robin Hood drama, circa 1475, but he was not the fat, jolly friar we know today. Perhaps that's because this Tuck might have been inspired by a real person.

Twice in 1417, royal writs demand the arrest of an outlaw who led a band which robbed, murdered and committed other acts of general mayhem. One report says he "assumed the name of Frere Tuk newly so called in the common parlance." As Holt explains "the men who drafted the writs of 1417 had apparently never heard the name Friar Tuck before." A letter in 1429 says Tuck is still at large, and mentions his real identity -- Robert Stafford, chaplain of Lindfield, Sussex.

This chaplain may have employed an alias from a pre-existing legend, but it's quite possible that he was the first to use the name of Tuck."

Last night, I watched Robin and Marian (1976) and for some odd reason the ending of the movie made me feel really sad :(

imdb.com/title/tt0075147/

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