What Protestant Denomination do you agree with most?


#1

In what ways are we unified? I am speaking of all Christian denominations here. Thanks and God Bless You.


#2

Probably on the surface, Lutherans and Episcopalians are closest to Catholics. We’re united in belief in the divinity of Christ, in belief in the Trinity.


#3

We are all children of God, and Christ came to reconcile all of us to the Father. And, whether they like it or not, we are all children of the Blessed Mother (Rev 12:17).


#4

[quote=PiusXIII]Probably on the surface, Lutherans and Episcopalians are closest to Catholics.
[/quote]

I’ll agree with this, and going to their service we would see a liturgy very similar. To the casual observer, not Catholic, it may all look the same.

Kotton :slight_smile:


#5

Lutheran, Anglo “Catholic”, Methodist… Anything else is just too far removed


#6

Traditional Anglicanism.


#7

As a confessional Lutheran, I really think you guys have more in common with evangelicals than with us, even though our liturgies are similar and we both confess the true body and blood of Christ in the Lord’s supper.


#8

[quote=Bugenhagen]As a confessional Lutheran, I really think you guys have more in common with evangelicals than with us, even though our liturgies are similar and we both confess the true body and blood of Christ in the Lord’s supper.
[/quote]

I’m curious as to why you say this. Can you please give me some examples of what Catholicism has in common with Evangelicals?

My answer to the title question, by the way, is Traditional Anglicans (C of E).


#9

Evangelicals and Catholics argue about things like whether or not we should pray to Mary, whether or not physical elements can be means of God’s grace, whether or not we ought to have rituals and formality in worship. All these things avoid the fundamental unity of Roman Catholics and Evangelicals regarding their synergistic doctrine of conversion, their emphasis on sanctification and the Christian life–on the Christian’s response to God’s grace–rather than the completed work of Christ, and the notion shared by Catholics and Evangelicals that the Holy Spirit is accessible apart from the external Word of God, preached and attached to physical elements.


#10

I never thought about or investigated such a thought.


#11

Catholics and evangelicals also share an appreciation for the sanctity of life which is sadly lacking among among many of the Episcopalians, Lutherans, Methodists, etc.


#12

[quote=Bugenhagen]Evangelicals and Catholics argue about things like whether or not we should pray to Mary, whether or not physical elements can be means of God’s grace, whether or not we ought to have rituals and formality in worship. All these things avoid the fundamental unity of Roman Catholics and Evangelicals regarding their synergistic doctrine of conversion, their emphasis on sanctification and the Christian life–on the Christian’s response to God’s grace–rather than the completed work of Christ, and the notion shared by Catholics and Evangelicals that the Holy Spirit is accessible apart from the external Word of God, preached and attached to physical elements.
[/quote]

I understand now what you are saying but I do not agree. Catholics do not argue about any of these things. We have remained consistently true to the “doctrine of faith” passed down to us from Christ and the apostles for 2,000 years. Evangelicals have disputed the legitimacy of the “doctrine of faith” and we correct them. You are mistaking this for “arguing”.


#13

[quote=urquhart]Catholics and evangelicals also share an appreciation for the sanctity of life which is sadly lacking among among many of the Episcopalians, Lutherans, Methodists, etc.
[/quote]

Among many, but not all. Our church has a yard full of crosses right now memorializing the hundreds of babies that are aborted every minute or second or hour in the US (I can’t remember which.) It bears remembering that the mainline Methodists, Lutherans, Presbyterians, etc. bear little resemblence to the historic doctrine and practice of their communions.


#14

[quote=Eden]I understand now what you are saying but I do not agree. Catholics do not argue about any of these things. We have remained consistently true to the “doctrine of faith” passed down to us from Christ and the apostles for 2,000 years. Evangelicals have disputed the legitimacy of the “doctrine of faith” and we correct them. You are mistaking this for “arguing”.
[/quote]

I’m familiar with what catholics think about their religion. I also know how people convert from Catholicism to evangelicalism and then become rabid anti-catholics. I have a sister in law this way. She really dislikes Lutheranism for being “too catholic,” but it occurs to me how much closer her own faith is to what she grew up with, at least regarding synergism and the emphasis upon human response to God’s grace rather than God’s grace.


#15

[quote=urquhart]Catholics and evangelicals also share an appreciation for the sanctity of life which is sadly lacking among among many of the Episcopalians, Lutherans, Methodists, etc.
[/quote]

True. But according to Fr. Neuhaus on EWTN, the Catholic Church was the only Church to consistently oppose abortion and the only Church to oppose Roe v. Wade. The Southern Baptists (who are now firmly in partnership with our opposition) supported Roe v. Wade in 1973:

Be it further RESOLVED, That we call upon Southern Baptists to work for legislation that will allow the possibility of abortion under such conditions as rape, incest, clear evidence of severe fetal deformity, and carefully ascertained evidence of the likelihood of damage to the emotional, mental, and physical health of the mother.

www.johnstonsarchive.net/baptist/sbcabres.html

ericsiegmund.com/fireant/archivesmt/000514.html

I was very surprised when I learned this.


#16

[quote=Bugenhagen]I’m familiar with what catholics think about their religion. I also know how people convert from Catholicism to evangelicalism and then become rabid anti-catholics. I have a sister in law this way. She really dislikes Lutheranism for being “too catholic,” but it occurs to me how much closer her own faith is to what she grew up with, at least regarding synergism and the emphasis upon human response to God’s grace rather than God’s grace.
[/quote]

The fact that ex-Catholic converts to the Evangelical churches are “rabid anti-Catholics” says more about the Evangelical faith than it does about Catholicism. Is it possible to be rabidly “anti-anything” and still be living true Christianity?


#17

How can you agree with a heresy? Arianism, Mohammedanism, Albigensianism, Protestantism and Modernism are the five(5) great heresies according to Hilaire Belloc. To those I would add Mormonism and maybe Scientology. All with the exceptions of Mohammedanism(Islam), Mormonism and Scientology have redeeming qualities, but I could never consider them.
Protestantism would have died out faster than Albigensianism or Arianism had it not been used by certain individuals as a land grab.


#18

[quote=Eden]True. But according to Fr. Neuhaus on EWTN, the Catholic Church was the only Church to consistently oppose abortion and the only Church to oppose Roe v. Wade. The Southern Baptists (who are now firmly in partnership with our opposition) supported Roe v. Wade in 1973:

Be it further RESOLVED, That we call upon Southern Baptists to work for legislation that will allow the possibility of abortion under such conditions as rape, incest, clear evidence of severe fetal deformity, and carefully ascertained evidence of the likelihood of damage to the emotional, mental, and physical health of the mother.

www.johnstonsarchive.net/baptist/sbcabres.html

ericsiegmund.com/fireant/archivesmt/000514.html

I was very surprised when I learned this.
[/quote]

Be very clear: most Protestants who say they are against abortion qualify it in these terms, which in my opinion is an ethical double-standard. Most of the same Protestants who hold such a stance also SUPPORT capital punishment (which to me is another ethical/moral double standard). Some Evangelicals, and most Southern Baptists, mirror the policies and platforms of the Republican Party,

O+


#19

Interestingly, Fr. Neuhaus used to be a pastor in the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod, although he was always rather too liberal as long as he was with us. But I guess he became relatively conservative after being in exile in the mainline Lutheran church.


#20

Fr. Neuhaus is brilliant. He was named one of 32 “most influential intellectuals in America.” by U.S. News and World Report. He is a great blessing to the Church.

This article: rightweb.irc-online.org/ind/neuhaus/neuhaus.php details his political growth.

"Like many neocon polemicists—from neocon godfather Irving Kristol to second generation ideologues like Michael Novak—Neuhaus came to neoconservatism after becoming disillusioned with the left. Since the late 1970s Neuhaus has been a leading cultural warrior in the neocon camp. As Neuhaus has written: “Politics is chiefly a function of culture, at the heart of culture is morality, and at the heart of morality is religion.”

BTW - My post is not “on topic” but I hope the “bump” will give it more opportunity for the original topic to be answered. :slight_smile:


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