What should faithful Catholics think of Sibohan O'Connor?


#1

I really hope that she hasn’t violated Canon 1373.


#2

Based only on that video, no, she didn’t violate 1373.
Maybe she was a ‘bad’ employee for not following directions. What she did isn’t a bad reflection on her as a Catholic.


#3

I really hope you arent also violating by giving these details more publicity than they dezerve?


#4

It is worth noting that Sibohan O’Connor will be speaking at the Silence Stops Now rally in Baltimore this week.


#5

Interesting that no other churches are held to such standards; there is even a site called bishop accountability that prints names of catholic clergy that are guilty or not or merely accused. The clergy of other churches also does bad things. But barring the FLDC scenario, the rest end up on page 6 of the news


#6

The Church founded by Christ himself SHOULD be held to a higher standard.

The “other people abuse too” excuse is dangerous…


#7

It is not an excuse; but to have the government do that and be “the moral high ground is more dangerous.” Criminals of all denominations should be locked up for the crimes they do. It is interesting that Catholics hold priests to higher standards that they would never hold themselves om all fronts, not just the conduct with children.


#8

She stole confidential documents with personnel information, and released all of them, or some of them, to the secular tv station. We don’t really know what Ms O’Connor, or the tv station, chose not to disclose from the theft. But things could be floating around, here and there.

What if a secretary at a human services agency decided to sneak out with private records? Is the Seventh Commandment still in force, or does the end justify the means?

If you say the End justifies the Means, then this is the ultimate slippery slope.


#9

When shame. scandal, and guilt are not addressed , these awful secrets are not to be kept. Nor to be spirited away in darkness to the Vatican like the former Cardinal of Boston did. This left the present one with a real mess to clean up.


#10

How important is the seventh commandment? If YOU sought counseling for some issue 30 years ago, should the details of that counseling be stolen and shown to the tv station? Do you think people will seek out counseling in the future?


#11

Jesus overturned tables, released sacrificial animals, and generally mad a mess as he was cleansing the temple. He could be seen as destroying other people’s property or stealing or causing a public disturbance. But he was fighting a wrong that had become so ingrained in the temple that it was not recognized by many people. I see this in the same way. Sometimes you have to do what is necessary in order to correct deep seated wrongs. God knows how long this has been occurring and how hidden it has been. He knows that many have worked towards correcting yet nothing of substance has been done. Very superficial talk with no real action. And mostly it has been silence.


#12

The greatest evils are not done by amoral people, but by those on a Sacred Cause. Commandments and such things that apply to little people do not apply to them.

We tend to admire the one who bravely takes on the Establishment. In this case, the local establishment - the news media and prochoice politicians - are making her a hero. She is granted publicity and media promotion the prolifers and similar group’s can only dream about. If some people have their personnel records released, that’s acceptable collateral damage.

The problem is that people say, Oh I generally don’t think the End justifies the Means…but in this one case, we can make an exception. We can go back to holding the seventh commandment tomorrow.

“It (breaking seventh commandment) won’t set a precedent…”


#13

Seeking counseling is not what is at stake here; hiding crimes is.


#14

Exactly. The only people involved that do not want the information coming out are the ones that are guilty or complicit in covering up the crimes. The victims are all for releasing their documents.


#15

She committed a crime if what commentor is saying is true.


#16

And so did the people that she worked for. Multiple times.


#17

Then she should be punished too.


#18

She is continuing to release stolen documents, bit by bit, to the media, even those unrelated to sex abuse. For instance, WKBW TV reported on the allegedly extravagant repairs or improvements to the Bishop’s home going on now, coming from her theft.

The problem is we don’t know what private emails she has photographed and has not released. Keep in mind most of emails are between the bishop and his lawyers. The diocese is in litigation.

We might want to trust her, but how much can you trust a thief?


#19

Apparently as much as you can trust some bishops, Cardinals, etc. If what she is saying (and other people as well), and as the evidence is piling up, we have been trusting some very distrustful individuals.


#20

The problem is that she felt that something needed to be done, and those who were responsible for doing it were not doing it. This is what she saw as her last resort: either hold her tongue about what she knew and thus participating in the cover-up, or getting documentation out so what she alleged would be backed up so people would not be able to dismiss her.

There are times when “taking” is not stealing. For example, if I were marooned on a mountain top and ran across some vacation cabins, it would be all right for me to go in and take what I needed to survive, because that would be unreasonable for the owners to withhold should they have been in residence.


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