What should I read next?


#1

Hey guys, I was wondering what you would recommend for me to read next?

Ive read John and Matthew and wanted to read another book before starting Luke.


#2

Read these passages:

Exodus 35:2

Deuteronomy 21:18-21 and 22:13-21

Leviticus 20:13


#3

Mark? :smiley:


#4

:confused:

May I ask why you come to a Catholic forum and post something like this? And I mean by taking passages and twisting them in order to suit your own ends. Leviticus 20:13 I believe is taken right out of context and no doubt the others too. You have twisted passages to imply accusations that can only incite the anger of those with the same misconceptions and misunderstandings.

Please see the following post - forums.catholic.com/showpost.php?p=12200936&postcount=186

God Bless

Thank you for reading
Josh


#5

What type of book would you be interested in reading then maybe we can narrow down some specific books for you.


#6

There are so many choices! Maybe one of the letters of Paul? Acts of the Apostles? If you want a really short adventure story, try Jonah. An adventure with some romance, try Tobit. I have never read all of Isaiah, but that might be interesting because of all the prophecies concerning Jesus. How about Psalms?


#7

Genesis is very important. I think you will find it interesting.


#8

Well, there’s two books actually: I and II Corinthians. The introductions in the NAB Study Bible are adequate introductions to these letters of Paul

II Co is thought to be a compilation of a couple letters of Paul.

II Co is thought to be the most difficult book of the NT to understand. What help to understand both letters is that Paul is writing to a “newly planted” church of his. In his day, he didn’t have a Vatican, a Pope, a Catechism, no Canon Law, no written New Testament, etc. and he had to try to keep his churches “in line.” As a result, in both letters he is hammering on his apostolic authority, because that’s all he had to appeal to, but that’s the truth – apostolic authority. And, at the same time, we see the beginning (more or less) of the Tradition of writing things down.

That he wrote letters indicates the urgency of the matters that he is writing about. And, you can appreciate that these letters were probably written before the gospels were written – so Paul is really juggling matters and bouncing around in his writing, to deal with several matters. You get a feeling that he is really writing earnestly to real people and trying to teach them to live up to the “gospel” that he has preached to them.

Another commentary makes the point that Paul is struggling to teach the Corinthians that religion – Paul wouldn’t use that word – involves their personal morality. Their relationship to Jesus and to the Father involves intercessory prayer and the conviction of their personal morality.

So, if you’ve already read two of the gospels, the letter to Corinth are a good continuation of a picture of what the early church was like.


#9

St. Luke wrote both the third Gospel and Acts of the Apostles. Luke’s Gospel deals with all that Jesus began to do and teach while on earth and Acts deals with all that Jesus continues to do and teach through the Church.

Acts can certainly be read by itself but it makes more sense to read them together, the Gospel first.

-Tim-


#10

Agreed. I just thought if p1990 has had enough of Gospels for the moment, and wants to try something new, that would be an option. Now that you mention it, it would make sense to read something else, then get back to Luke and then Acts.


#11

I agree with your last sentence and would go further. It is time to get into a good Bible study such as Jeff Cavins/Great Adventure to learn the context of each book and then go back and read in earnest, armed with a greater understanding of the background to what is being read.

-Tim-


#12

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