What should we be looking in church for


#1

just an open ended question....:confused:


#2

Well considering each service/mass covers a different topic.... If you have a certain question and its not covered that day in service, then you're either going to have to ask somebody or wait for the topic to come up.

Although hopefully at every mass, you get something new out of it.


#3

This will probably sound trite but honestly we should be looking for Jesus Christ and that is it. We receive His body, blood, soul and divinity in the Eucharist and we grow closer to Him through the other scraments. We should also look for him in those we go to church with. I often find myself making quick judgments about the other people I see in the pews, sometimes good, other time rather negative. The thing is all I should be looking for is Him in them as we are all part of His body. Of equal importance is that I look for Jesus Christ inside myself. I think we would all treat ourselves better if we knew that Christ is in us, especially after we receive Him in the Eucharist.

We should not be looking for entertainment even though it is great to have a nice homily, music etc.

Just my thoughts.


#4

We should be looking for all those people who come to church wearing the wrong clothing so we can laugh at them later.

JK!

:rolleyes:

we should be looking inside ourselves to get ready to receive Christ's Body and Blood.

Do I win a prize??

:D


#5

[quote="Sierrah, post:1, topic:219885"]
just an open ended question....:confused:

[/quote]

What we should look for in a church? That's easy!! One, Holy, catholic and Apostolic. If they have those four, you are probably good. Then make sure that they teach the true faith. There ya go!


#6

Your question is so open-ended that I’m not 100% sure what you’re asking.

If you’re asking what to look for in a denomination, you have some good answers already: that is, look for the truth, and you’ll find it in the Catholic Church.

If you’re asking what to look for when you’re at Mass, I’d recommend reading What Happens at Mass, by Fr. Jeremy Driscoll. It is meant for the adult layperson. It does not assume a deep background, but it is not a simplistic book, either. It is very good. I can’t think of a better place to start, if you’re not sure what you’re supposed to see at Mass. He discusses the theology in the workings of every part. Many parishes are using it now as the basis for adult education series about the Mass. People with a deep background in their understanding of the Mass read this book and want to buy a boxful, so they’ll have enough for everyone with a question like yours.

The thing is, Fr. Driscoll’s book will tell you a lot about what the Eucharist makes you into, or I should say makes us into, as well, and how that happens. As the Church teaches, the Mass is “the source and the summit of the Christian life.” It is the saving act by which the Father sends the Son and the Son offers His life and from His Risen Glory sends the Holy Spirit, it is the act by which the Holy Spirit makes us into His Bride, the Church, bringing us by remembering into the entire Pascal Mystery, from the Incarnation to Calvary to Pentecost. In it, God speaks His Word, and not in the sense of lecturing but in the sense in which by His Word He spoke the universe into existence. The Mass is so unspeakably tremendous, you can’t get to the bottom of how awesome it is or what it does, but some theology starts getting you awakened to it.

In 2005, Fr. Driscoll was appointed by Pope John Paul II as consultor to the Congregation for Divine Worship, he’s been teaching at the seminary in Oregon for over 25 years, and at Sant’Anselmo in Rome for over 15, too, so you can feel certain you have yourself an orthodox teacher when you read this book.

Learn about the Mass, then worship as you’ve learned and live as you’ve worshipped, then repeat, repeat, repeat. That is the way to go, I think.


#7

[quote="Sierrah, post:1, topic:219885"]
just an open ended question....:confused:

[/quote]

The Truth.

But that begs the question, "What is Truth?" and therein lies the quandary for many. The short and simplist (from a Christian's perspective) answer is that Truth = God and specifically, as this relates most directly to human beings, Jesus Christ.


#8

Love...when i go to Church i look for God's love and it makes me stronger.


#9

we should be looking to worship The Father through the only acceptable sacrifice, Jesus Christ The Son, who is made present in the Eucharist by the power of the The Holy Spirit.


#10

[quote="BlueShadow123, post:2, topic:219885"]
Well considering each service/mass covers a different topic.... If you have a certain question and its not covered that day in service, then you're either going to have to ask somebody or wait for the topic to come up.

Although hopefully at every mass, you get something new out of it.

[/quote]

Jesus is the answer to every question and yes since Jesus is present in every Mass, we receive all the answers we need at every Mass.


#11

[quote="puzzleannie, post:10, topic:219885"]
Jesus is the answer to every question and yes since Jesus is present in every Mass, we receive all the answers we need at every Mass.

[/quote]

HAHA. I don't think so.

Whats the answer to the cure for cancer?
Your response: 'jesus'

Wth?

No, jesus has not answered everybodys questions, I can tell you that. Because if he did, half the people on here wouldn't even be on this site posting.

Jesus isn't the answer to everything. Its not like 2+2= jesus... :rolleyes: God may have created everything, but last I checked the mail, he wasn't sending all my answers. He gave us knowledge and logic so we could use it for eachother. there are many things the bible doesn't answer, and I think there is a reason for that.


#12

First and foremost, the Eucharist. The beginning of your inward journey to your true self.


#13

well I was in Mass in St. Marks Cathedral in Venice, and one guy was looking at all the mosaics and other decorations with a pair of binoculars.


#14

[quote="Nechasin, post:13, topic:219885"]
well I was in Mass in St. Marks Cathedral in Venice, and one guy was looking at all the mosaics and other decorations with a pair of binoculars.

[/quote]

Lol. Well most catholic churches are pretty amazing to look at. Very well done, detailed interior.


#15

[quote="BlueShadow123, post:11, topic:219885"]

Jesus is the answer to every question and yes since Jesus is present in every Mass, we receive all the answers we need at every Mass.

HAHA. I don't think so.

Whats the answer to the cure for cancer?
Your response: 'jesus'

Wth?

No, jesus has not answered everybodys questions, I can tell you that. Because if he did, half the people on here wouldn't even be on this site posting.

Jesus isn't the answer to everything. Its not like 2+2= jesus... :rolleyes: God may have created everything, but last I checked the mail, he wasn't sending all my answers. He gave us knowledge and logic so we could use it for eachother. there are many things the bible doesn't answer, and I think there is a reason for that.

[/quote]

BlueShadow, I can see your point, and you are right that it is a theological mistake to oversimplify what the concept of the centrality of God in all things means in practical terms, but let's get back to the context of the original question.

When you say, "there are many things the bible doesn't answer, and I think there is a reason for that", I think you are right, but let us clarify: not because God is not central to every question, but because we were never meant to have a paint-by-numbers spirituality. As Thomas Merton put it: "A spiritual life is first of all a life."

The Bible was not meant to be that kid in class who was willing to slip you all the answers so that you could pass the test without having actually gotten an education. God doesn't speak to us in dry instructions. God speaks to us through a shared life, because a shared life is both what we need and what God intends our sojourn on earth to lead us to. The Bible, then, is not an authority of itself, but is rather a faithful instrument of instruction through which the Holy Spirit speaks. It does not yield its sweetness, except when you access it in docility to the Holy Spirit. The definitive place to access that sweetness is in the entirety of the Mass.

The Word of God at Mass isn't simply a matter of "each service/mass covers a different topic". Of course the Holy Scriptures are chosen so as to suggest a theme as a context for listening. The Word of God at Mass, however, is Jesus Christ himself, not a lecture topic. That is why when God speaks, it isn't a lecture. When God speaks, it is an event. Things come into being by the power of God's Word, through His Son, by the working of the Holy Spirit.

Our Lord is implicitly the answer to every question. Take cancer: He is the great Healer. If we are looking for a cure, would we not start by asking for God's guidance and help? If a cure is found to cancer, will we not praise God for it? "Through Him, with Him, in Him, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, all glory and honor are yours Almighty Father, for ever and ever."

For that reason, we don't have to wait for an explicit "answer" in the theme or homily of a Mass. The truth is, if we do not open our hearts to hear God's word, not just as a source of religious education, but as the primary moving force in our one life, then we may very well have the explicit answer to a question hit our ears, and we won't even know it.

Mass does set every one of our questions in its true and greater context, even 2 + 2! If you don't believe me, then you have fortunately missed those who reduce the meaning of life to equations, statistics, numbers, and that small slice of rational thinking that is accessible to the human imagination and intelligence. OK, so 2 + 2 = 4....now what? So what? That is what I mean by context. If you don't know how to answer "now what?" or "So what?" before you start calculating, what good does it do to figure out that 2 + 2 = 4?

So when we go to Mass with questions, we need to open ourselves to placing our questions in the context of our shared life as Church, in the context of our place in the Body of Christ, in the context of our dependence on God in all things, and in the context of God's infinite love.

Does that mean going to Mass will take the place of studying for a math test? Of course not. You are absolutely right about that. It does mean that we should never try to have some separate compartment of our lives in which we keep problems that someone might say "has nothing to do with Jesus." That is a huge mistake.


#16

[quote="EasterJoy, post:15, topic:219885"]
BlueShadow, I can see your point, and you are right that it is a theological mistake to oversimplify what the concept of the centrality of God in all things means in practical terms, but let's get back to the context of the original question.

When you say, "there are many things the bible doesn't answer, and I think there is a reason for that", I think you are right, but let us clarify: not because God is not central to every question, but because we were never meant to have a paint-by-numbers spirituality. As Thomas Merton put it: "A spiritual life is first of all a life."

The Bible was not meant to be that kid in class who was willing to slip you all the answers so that you could pass the test without having actually gotten an education. God doesn't speak to us in dry instructions. God speaks to us through a shared life, because a shared life is both what we need and what God intends our sojourn on earth to lead us to. The Bible, then, is not an authority of itself, but is rather a faithful instrument of instruction through which the Holy Spirit speaks. It does not yield its sweetness, except when you access it in docility to the Holy Spirit. The definitive place to access that sweetness is in the entirety of the Mass.

The Word of God at Mass isn't simply a matter of "each service/mass covers a different topic". Of course the Holy Scriptures are chosen so as to suggest a theme as a context for listening. The Word of God at Mass, however, is Jesus Christ himself, not a lecture topic. That is why when God speaks, it isn't a lecture. When God speaks, it is an event. Things come into being by the power of God's Word, through His Son, by the working of the Holy Spirit.

Our Lord is implicitly the answer to every question. Take cancer: He is the great Healer. If we are looking for a cure, would we not start by asking for God's guidance and help? If a cure is found to cancer, will we not praise God for it? "Through Him, with Him, in Him, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, all glory and honor are yours Almighty Father, for ever and ever."

For that reason, we don't have to wait for an explicit "answer" in the theme or homily of a Mass. The truth is, if we do not open our hearts to hear God's word, not just as a source of religious education, but as the primary moving force in our one life, then we may very well have the explicit answer to a question hit our ears, and we won't even know it.

Mass does set every one of our questions in its true and greater context, even 2 + 2! If you don't believe me, then you have fortunately missed those who reduce the meaning of life to equations, statistics, numbers, and that small slice of rational thinking that is accessible to the human imagination and intelligence. OK, so 2 + 2 = 4....now what? So what? That is what I mean by context. If you don't know how to answer "now what?" or "So what?" before you start calculating, what good does it do to figure out that 2 + 2 = 4?

So when we go to Mass with questions, we need to open ourselves to placing our questions in the context of our shared life as Church, in the context of our place in the Body of Christ, in the context of our dependence on God in all things, and in the context of God's infinite love.

Does that mean going to Mass will take the place of studying for a math test? Of course not. You are absolutely right about that. It does mean that we should never try to have some separate compartment of our lives in which we keep problems that someone might say "has nothing to do with Jesus." That is a huge mistake.

[/quote]

I already know this.
It was a sarcastic comment.
Dictionary.com can define sarcasm for you.

I cant believe you went to great lengths to write a post like that. Obviously the bible was not made to be a science or math book. Next time before you write something like that, ask me if I was being sarcastic or not. It will save you time.
What I meant by Jesus being the answer to everything, is that hes not.
And claiming that he is is one of the most ridiculous things I've ever heard.
Its more of a philosophical stand point.


#17

[quote="BlueShadow123, post:16, topic:219885"]
I already know this.
It was a sarcastic comment.
Dictionary.com can define sarcasm for you.

I cant believe you went to great lengths to write a post like that. Obviously the bible was not made to be a science or math book. Next time before you write something like that, ask me if I was being sarcastic or not. It will save you time.
What I meant by Jesus being the answer to everything, is that hes not.
And claiming that he is is one of the most ridiculous things I've ever heard.
Its more of a philosophical stand point.

[/quote]

An interesting summary of your Christology, BlueShadow.


#18

[quote="EasterJoy, post:17, topic:219885"]
An interesting summary of your Christology, BlueShadow.

[/quote]

Its not my 'christology'. I was just making a sarcastic point. Quit assuming things. Thanks :thumbsup:


#19

Blueshadow, you are the most obnoxious person I have encountered in quite a while. I'm sure I thought I knew everything at the age of 15 (and sometimes I still do at the age of 24), but please tone down the smug replies a bit.


#20

[quote="Sierrah, post:1, topic:219885"]
just an open ended question....:confused:

[/quote]

At St. Catherine's Westford, MA an open seat ... :highprayer:


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