What singular act consecrates a Bishop?


#1

For Baptisms, all that is needed for it to be valid is the Trinitarian formula and water.

For the Eucharist, all that is needed for it to be valid are the words “This is My Body” and “This is My Blood.”

As such I’m guessing that the consecration of a bishop is done through one act, rather than the succession of acts. If this is so, what specifically consecrates a bishop? Is it the imposition of hands? Or is it with the anointing of oil?


#2

My understanding is in the ordination of each a deacon, priest and bishop, it is the laying on of hands by a bishop that confers the sacrament.


#3

While we’re on the topic, is it possible that when Jesus consecrated the first bishops during the Last Supper that he used oil? I read it in Anne Catherine Emmerich’s book but I found it hard to believe that chrism was used then, but what do I know.


#4

***When a deacon is ordained, only one bishop lays hands on the man.

During the ordination of a priest, one bishop and all priests present lay hands on the deacon.

During the consecration of a bishop, three bishops lay hands on the priest.

There is more to the rituals, but that is the essential difference.***


#5

[quote="WMM, post:4, topic:287213"]


During the consecration of a bishop, three bishops lay hands on the priest.


[/quote]

As I understand it though, it isn't even actually necessary for there to be three bishops for it to be valid. One bishop is enough, even though it may be illicit. Isn't that the deal with the illicit LeFebvre consecrations? He did it without co-consecrators and it was valid anyway.


#6

[quote="PazzoGrande, post:5, topic:287213"]
As I understand it though, it isn't even actually necessary for there to be three bishops for it to be valid. One bishop is enough, even though it may be illicit. Isn't that the deal with the illicit LeFebvre consecrations? He did it without co-consecrators and it was valid anyway.

[/quote]

It is my recollection that LeFebvre had co-consecrators at the ordinations in question. (they were also ex-communicated) The episcopal ordinations were illicit due to the lack of approval or consent of Rome.

It is valid and licit in each of the ordinations if only 1 bishop is present. The fact that the priests and/or bishops is just a custom, not a necessity.


#7

[quote="Big_Feet, post:2, topic:287213"]
My understanding is in the ordination of each a deacon, priest and bishop, it is the laying on of hands by a bishop that confers the sacrament.

[/quote]

I think you are strongly support for that in Acts 6:6 [The ordination of the first deacons]

These they set before the apostles, and they prayed and laid their hands upon them

and 2 Timothy 1:6 [Paul's ordination of Timothy]

6 Hence I remind you to rekindle the gift of God that is within you through the laying on of my hands;

The* laying on of hands* seems synonymous with ordination in all the early writings.


#8

Ah, you’re right about that, I Googled it. I wonder why everyone talks about LeFebvre and nobody talks about the co-consecrating Bishop. I thought LeFebvre was acting on his own.


#9

[quote="PazzoGrande, post:8, topic:287213"]
Ah, you're right about that, I Googled it. I wonder why everyone talks about LeFebvre and nobody talks about the co-consecrating Bishop. I thought LeFebvre was acting on his own.

[/quote]

There was one co-consecrator at the Econe consecrations, not two.

And yes, only one bishop is necessary for validity, but unless some sort of specific situation applies, three are necessary for liceity. And of course a Papal Mandate is as well. =/ But all four consecrated at Econe are valid bishops.


#10

The Divine Grace, which always healeth that which is infirm, and completeth that which is wanting, through the laying-on of hands, elevateth the most devout (Sub-deacon, Deacon, Archimandrite, Hiero-monk) (Name) to be a (Deacon, Priest, Bishop): Wherefore, let us pray for him, that the grace of the all-holy Spirit may come upon him.

This is the singular prayer that is used in the Eastern Church (in 100 year old language) common to ordinations. Awaiting my ordination, I can't explain to you how moving it was for me to meditate on the theme that this simple prayer contains within its words.


#11

[quote="deaconluke, post:10, topic:287213"]
The Divine Grace, which always healeth that which is infirm, and completeth that which is wanting, through the laying-on of hands, elevateth the most devout (Sub-deacon, Deacon, Archimandrite, Hiero-monk) (Name) to be a (Deacon, Priest, Bishop): Wherefore, let us pray for him, that the grace of the all-holy Spirit may come upon him.

This is the singular prayer that is used in the Eastern Church (in 100 year old language) common to ordinations. Awaiting my ordination, I can't explain to you how moving it was for me to meditate on the theme that this simple prayer contains within its words.

[/quote]

Congratulations on your upcoming ordination. I'm sure you'll be a great witness to Christ and a great asset for us.:thumbsup:


#12

[quote="PazzoGrande, post:11, topic:287213"]
Congratulations on your upcoming ordination. I'm sure you'll be a great witness to Christ and a great asset for us.:thumbsup:

[/quote]

I see that what I said was confusing.:blush: I was ordained 5 years ago, but seeing my classmates being ordained, I was able to really ponder that prayer and when it was said over my head I could not help but to be filled with the awesome feeling of the Holy Spirit. Thank you for your kind words and may God be merciful to me a sinner.


#13

[quote="PazzoGrande, post:3, topic:287213"]
While we're on the topic, is it possible that when Jesus consecrated the first bishops during the Last Supper that he used oil? ... I found it hard to believe that chrism was used then

[/quote]

Doesn't seem remotely implausible. Anointing with oil goes way back. Here are three Old Testament references that spring immediately to mind:

Then Samuel took the horn of oil, and anointed [David] in the midst of his brothers - 1 Samuel 16:13

you love righteousness and hate wickedness. Therefore God, your God, has anointed you with the oil of gladness above your fellows; - Psalm 45:7

  • It is like the precious oil upon the head, running down upon the beard, upon the beard of Aaron, running down on the collar of his robes!* - Psalm 133:2

#14

[quote="PazzoGrande, post:1, topic:287213"]
For Baptisms, all that is needed for it to be valid is the Trinitarian formula and water.

For the Eucharist, all that is needed for it to be valid are the words "This is My Body" and "This is My Blood."

As such I'm guessing that the consecration of a bishop is done through one act, rather than the succession of acts. If this is so, what specifically consecrates a bishop? Is it the imposition of hands? Or is it with the anointing of oil?

[/quote]

Hello,

The essential aspect is the laying on of hands along with the prayer of consecration/ordination. This was declared to be the necessary matter and form by Pius XII in his apostolic constitution Sacramentum Ordinis of 1947, which can be found here: papalencyclicals.net/Pius12/P12SACRAO.HTM

Dan


#15

[quote="PazzoGrande, post:3, topic:287213"]
While we're on the topic, is it possible that when Jesus consecrated the first bishops during the Last Supper that he used oil? I read it in Anne Catherine Emmerich's book but I found it hard to believe that chrism was used then, but what do I know.

[/quote]

Although it is now defined that Christ instituted the priesthood at the Last Supper, it was not the unanimous opinion of all theologians that the Episcopate was instituted at the same time. A few theologians placed it as being after the Resurrection though many said it was at the Last Supper. However, the ordination to the priesthood of the Apostles (and if one admits it, the episcopate) was done by the divine power and will of Christ. He did not use the laying on of hands, etc. at that point, although the Apostles did in other ordinations.

The pious visions, even of saints, often convey spiritual points, not historical truths.


#16

And here is Paul VI on the “matter and form” of the revised rites:

ewtn.com/library/PAPALDOC/P6ORDIN.HTM


#17

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