What the internet has killed

Ran across this from Newsweek.
Among the casualties; phone books, yearbooks, DVD rentals and, unmourned, "adult theaters".

unmourned, adult theaters
…Which is because of porn on the internet. Not exactly a good thing.

Not bashing the internet, just not quite getting the point here… eh…

One of the things on the list is "facts". The Internet has killed facts? It's amazing that with information a thousand times more accessible than just a decade ago, that ignorance and erroneous facts are no less common today.

Another item, the Internet has killed "peep shows". See, internet porn isn't all bad.

[quote="didymus, post:1, topic:222298"]
Ran across this from Newsweek.
Among the casualties; phone books, yearbooks, DVD rentals and, unmourned, "adult theaters".

[/quote]

Let's not forget the newspapers, too. I lost my job, two years ago, as a research reader with a clipping service, because of the internet and the newpapers closing down.

Eventually, all newspapers and print media will end. Newspaper are partially kept alive by older subscribers, who will die off. And, electronic media isn't yet sufficiently convenient and ubiquitous.

In ten years, all forms of physical media (blu-ray, etc.) will start to vanish. Printers will vanish.

In thirty years, computers and robots will be able to dominate most professions. Your car will drive itself across town. Your computer will teach your children. Many movie celebrities will be real-looking computer generated characters.

In a hundred years, humans will be obsolete.

[quote="Steel_Pinwheel, post:5, topic:222298"]
Eventually, all newspapers and print media will end. Newspaper are partially kept alive by older subscribers, who will die off. And, electronic media isn't yet sufficiently convenient and ubiquitous.

In ten years, all forms of physical media (blu-ray, etc.) will start to vanish. Printers will vanish.

In thirty years, computers and robots will be able to dominate most professions. Your car will drive itself across town. Your computer will teach your children. Many movie celebrities will be real-looking computer generated characters.

In a hundred years, humans will be obsolete.

[/quote]

And they say de Chardin's Omega Point won't happen! :D

But seriously, I disagree, humans should be somewhat intelligent enough to leave at least one job for themselves. If I were a robotic engineer in the future, I would be sure to make intelligence and self-replication not on the same model - one or the other!

Also, I highly doubt the printer would be made obsolete, because 3D printing would be virtually required to efficiently and cheaply produce the bots and their parts.

[quote="Steel_Pinwheel, post:5, topic:222298"]
Eventually, all newspapers and print media will end. Newspaper are partially kept alive by older subscribers, who will die off. And, electronic media isn't yet sufficiently convenient and ubiquitous.

In ten years, all forms of physical media (blu-ray, etc.) will start to vanish. Printers will vanish.

In thirty years, computers and robots will be able to dominate most professions. Your car will drive itself across town. Your computer will teach your children. Many movie celebrities will be real-looking computer generated characters.

In a hundred years, humans will be obsolete.

[/quote]

I think you are behind the times...this has already happened.:p

And, believe me, I do feel absolutely obselete....

Well, maybe then, when the newspapers are all gone, and there are no longer any grandchildren for me to make newsprint pirate hats for, God will come down with His big keyring and say, " Gentlemen, it's closing time."

I'm pretty sure there are still "adult" theatres... :shrug:

[quote="Pieman333272, post:6, topic:222298"]
But seriously, I disagree, humans should be somewhat intelligent enough to leave at least one job for themselves. If I were a robotic engineer in the future, I would be sure to make intelligence and self-replication not on the same model - one or the other!

[/quote]

I don't think computers will ever be able to be creative, so humans will always be needed for creativity. And, consumers will always want to interact with humans (I doubt in a hundred years that robots, in person, will be able to fool others into thinking they're human).

Also, I highly doubt the printer would be made obsolete, because 3D printing would be virtually required to efficiently and cheaply produce the bots and their parts.

I meant printers used for producing printed paper. Yes, 3D printers, and other Santa Clause machines, have a big future in manufacturing.

[quote="Steel_Pinwheel, post:5, topic:222298"]
Eventually, all newspapers and print media will end. Newspaper are partially kept alive by older subscribers, who will die off. And, electronic media isn't yet sufficiently convenient and ubiquitous.

In ten years, all forms of physical media (blu-ray, etc.) will start to vanish. Printers will vanish.

In thirty years, computers and robots will be able to dominate most professions. Your car will drive itself across town. Your computer will teach your children. Many movie celebrities will be real-looking computer generated characters.

In a hundred years, humans will be obsolete.

[/quote]

This is totally true. My dad still gets the paper and if I want to I can read it, yet I still prefer to read the same paper online instead.

[quote="Steel_Pinwheel, post:5, topic:222298"]
Eventually, all newspapers and print media will end. Newspaper are partially kept alive by older subscribers, who will die off. And, electronic media isn't yet sufficiently convenient and ubiquitous.

In ten years, all forms of physical media (blu-ray, etc.) will start to vanish. Printers will vanish.

In thirty years, computers and robots will be able to dominate most professions. Your car will drive itself across town. Your computer will teach your children. Many movie celebrities will be real-looking computer generated characters.

In a hundred years, humans will be obsolete.

[/quote]

Something to slot in there somewhere--the invasion of space aliens who, first thing, destroy all our communications satellites and send us all back to writing with charcoal on scraps of sheetrock that we find.

DaveBj

[quote="DaveBj, post:11, topic:222298"]
Something to slot in there somewhere--the invasion of space aliens who, first thing, destroy all our communications satellites and send us all back to writing with charcoal on scraps of sheetrock that we find.

DaveBj

[/quote]

YES!!! That's when folks will want the press clippings about the event and we reseacher readers will be back in business!!

:coffeeread:

[quote="Steel_Pinwheel, post:5, topic:222298"]
Eventually, all newspapers and print media will end. Newspaper are partially kept alive by older subscribers, who will die off. And, electronic media isn't yet sufficiently convenient and ubiquitous.

In ten years, all forms of physical media (blu-ray, etc.) will start to vanish. Printers will vanish.

In thirty years, computers and robots will be able to dominate most professions. Your car will drive itself across town. Your computer will teach your children. Many movie celebrities will be real-looking computer generated characters.

In a hundred years, humans will be obsolete.

[/quote]

I'm still waiting for that flying car they have been talking about for decades now. :whistle:

So, just waiting for the older generation to die off? A sad way to look at the future. First, the passage of time changes ZERO - Nothing. Only human decisions change things.

Just call a national paper company some time. Do you know what people with computers are doing? They print things and they are using lots and lots of paper. Business documents still require real signatures.

Robots will never be ubiquitous except in the military. You think suicide bombers are bad? How about a robot that goes in guns blazing and then blows itself up right next to a valuable target?

The internet is filled with malicious anarchists trying to convince people that rumor and hearsay should be elevated to facts.

In the next few years, media companies will push for the passage of laws that will wall off and shut down parts of the internet. Billions of dollars are at stake so I think they have a case.

Peace,
Ed

is armageddon!... get to the choppah!!!

sorry i couldn't help it...LOL :p

[quote="edwest2, post:14, topic:222298"]
Just call a national paper company some time. Do you know what people with computers are doing? They print things and they are using lots and lots of paper. Business documents still require real signatures.

[/quote]

I notice that older people do a lot of printing. Some of that is because they can read paper more easily than their monitors. A big part of it is because this is the easier way for them to save and share things. But, that will change. The less computer savvy will die out and computers themselves will continue to grow easier to use.

Also, businesses eventually will only require electronic signatures, like when you buy something at the store with a bank card.

Robots will never be ubiquitous except in the military.

I promise you, in twenty years, robots will be everywhere. No flying cars, but a robot will mow your lawn and pick your vegetables. In ten years, half your vegetables will be picked by robots and Walmart will sell lawn robots.

In the next few years, media companies will push for the passage of laws that will wall off and shut down parts of the internet. Billions of dollars are at stake so I think they have a case.

In ten years, nearly everyone will have high-speed mobile internet and it will be seen as a right and basic necessity as much as a public utility. Practically every electric item you buy in the store will have wireless internet connectivity (because it will add only 50 cents to the price of a toaster). No company will be able to wall-off the internet.

I look forward to the innovations, especially the robots that do our menial, backbreaking, boring, repetitive work and free us up for more creative pursuits.

I also think such innovations will make the world a smaller and hopefully friendlier place. I'm hoping (but with a lot of doubt) that such "smallness" will make it easier for us to have world peace.

Flying car?! I'm waiting for the Star Trek transporter! If we had such a thing right now, getting outsourced to India or China would no longer be a big deal.

I think that a big question should be--"What jobs in the U.S. will be crying out for employees in the next twenty to fifty years?" This is an important question for parents who have young children, as well as for twenty and thirty-year-old people (and even 40 year-old people). E.g., if a lot of jobs (e.g., print media technicians) will be phased out over the next few decades, it would be wise for parents to help their children move away from interest in those jobs, and it would be best for young and middle-aged adults who are currently in those jobs to start training right now for something else in the quickly-approaching future.

I think that health care professions will continue to be wide open. As people become more and more sedentary and spend less time outdoors, they also become more unhealthy. At the same time, many people try to stay active by participating in various sports, and these can lead to injuries. I'm kind of hoping that Dr. McCoy's scanner will become a reality in the medical field, as misdiagnosis still happens. I'm also very concerned about the need to work on developing antibiotics, as we are rapidly (within 10-20 years) losing the antibiotics we currently use to microbial resistance. If we don't develop more antibiotics, we may very well all be in the ground in twenty years! Funny, isn't it, that a tiny bacteria could wipe out humankind, except for the few super humans who have genetic immunity to bacterial infections.

[quote="didymus, post:1, topic:222298"]
Ran across this from Newsweek.
Among the casualties; phone books, yearbooks, DVD rentals and, unmourned, "adult theaters".

[/quote]

Phone books, what are they? It's been so long since i have actually seen one, i have forgotten what they look like, I can't see dvd's/blu ray rentals fading out for a while. The rental stores i go to are always busy. I think it is just easier to go to the store to be honest. The only time i turn to online movie renting is if i am after a hard to get movie.

[quote="Steel_Pinwheel, post:16, topic:222298"]
I notice that older people do a lot of printing. Some of that is because they can read paper more easily than their monitors. A big part of it is because this is the easier way for them to save and share things. But, that will change. The less computer savvy will die out and computers themselves will continue to grow easier to use.

Also, businesses eventually will only require electronic signatures, like when you buy something at the store with a bank card.

I promise you, in twenty years, robots will be everywhere. No flying cars, but a robot will mow your lawn and pick your vegetables. In ten years, half your vegetables will be picked by robots and Walmart will sell lawn robots.

In ten years, nearly everyone will have high-speed mobile internet and it will be seen as a right and basic necessity as much as a public utility. Practically every electric item you buy in the store will have wireless internet connectivity (because it will add only 50 cents to the price of a toaster). No company will be able to wall-off the internet.

[/quote]

Quite a bit of what your talking about is the same hype that has already been put out. Some of it has come to pass, some of it we're still waiting on decades later. The robots can do a lot but they will not be able to do everything. Everything does have it's limits, including the robot. Also they will still need people to design, build, and work on the things which is a limitation in itself.

I'm not denying that we have definitely become more computerized but listening to the past you would think we would have been even farther than we are now, so call me a skeptic. I don't really see us getting as far as you believe. I honestly think, that on some of this stuff we will hit the ceiling. There are many things that where considered to be the next big thing that was going to revolutionize the world only to have the item in question fall flat when it hit the market. If people aren't interested in the item they won't buy it.

[quote="Cat, post:17, topic:222298"]
I think that a big question should be--"What jobs in the U.S. will be crying out for employees in the next twenty to fifty years?" This is an important question for parents who have young children, as well as for twenty and thirty-year-old people (and even 40 year-old people). E.g., if a lot of jobs (e.g., print media technicians) will be phased out over the next few decades, it would be wise for parents to help their children move away from interest in those jobs, and it would be best for young and middle-aged adults who are currently in those jobs to start training right now for something else in the quickly-approaching future.

[/quote]

Healthcare is always safe and growing, even though it is already a very popular career choice for young people. Technology is part of the reason we've become such a service-career oriented society (the other reason, cheap imports).

People who think the lack of flying cars contradicts the people who make strong predictions about robots don't see the difference between improvements in automation/efficiency vs. new kinds of technology. Really, the technology already exists for robots to take over, all that needs to be done is some tweaking and cost reduction. A robot lawnmower costs about $1500, when it costs $100, every home owner will have one. Or consider, farming, when illegal immigrants make sub-minimum wage, a robot picker that does a so-so job just isn't worth it - but that will change.

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