What type of Catholic are you?


#1

What type of Catholic are you?

[list]
*]*ULTRATRADITIONALIST: *extremely critical of the changes brought about by Vatican II and wish the church would return to its earlier course.
*]*TRADITIONALIST: *very critical of liberalism and modernism within the church, but they are generally accepting of the reforms found in Vatican II
*]*LIBERAL: **replaced the Bible and church authority with the authority of human reason and personal spiritual experience
*
*]*CHARISMATIC / EVANGELICAL: *emphasize the charisma or gifts of the Holy Spirit, the importance of being baptized in the Holy Spirit, and the Spirit-filled life
*]*CULTURAL: *baptized, married, and buried in the Catholic church – but have little or no concern about spiritual matters
*]*POSTMODERNIST: *hostile to most anyone who makes claim to objective truth

[/list]


#2

…the type that is trying…:smiley: …I am working hard…overtime…working weekdays and weekends…long hours…every once in a while I’ll do all nighters


#3

1st Apostolic Full Gospel Church of Jesus Christ Unreformed Roman Assembly of God


#4

Just a Catholic.

Those categories are kind of limiting. According to those categories… I may be a traditionalist. But, there are things that make me not a traditionalist.

I am critical on most things that are seen as liberal. However, that label makes things difficult. In other words, I am against the death penalty. According to standards that are used… I would be liberal.

Some things that are seen as “modern” I may not have a problem with. I would say I am consvative on most issues, and have no disgruntles with the Church. I would be kind of traditional in this aspect…However, I may be labled a liberal if I were to support the notion of priests being married.

I don’t really like these kind of questions. To be Catholic goes way beyond beliefs about married priests, liturgy, and politics.

Just my opinion.


#5

It’s obvious that those definitions are from a negative source. I don’t subscribe to any of them in isolation. Can you just be a humble follower of Christ?


#6

orthodox Catholic (yes with a little “o”) :slight_smile:

Maranatha,
Hans


#7

Where did you get these definitions.

I would be a liberal, but I consider the bible and the church the authority for that liberalism.

Both the old and new testements are mainfestos of social justice. They continually call for social justice.

Throughout the Gospels, Christ sets himself up in opposotion to the conservative priesthood of the Temple, the Scribes and Pharisees.

If you look at the scrives and Pharisees, they represent the conservative, literalist, priesthood, who insist on ritual rather than spirit. There are something like a total of 135 passages in the New Testement that either speak about the social obligations that those who are well off have to the needy, or just plain condemn the well off for not meeting those obligations. These make it clear that any wealth you have came from God and that God means you to do his will with it. When Christ spoke to the rich young man who asked him what he needed to do to have eternal life , the Lord didnt suggest the tricle down theory of economics. No , Christ wasnt a supply sider.

Now there are some parts of scripture that can be used to try to point towards some sort of conservative ecenomic ideas, but they take a stretch, and usually must be taken out of context.
When Christ said that “the poor will always be with you” I dont think he was giving an order for us to make sure it stayed that way. When he said that if someone takes your cloak, give him your tunic as well.I think he is speaking to some sort of social justice, not necessarily lettting yourself be taken advantage of.
The old testement is filled with injunctions to treat your servants well, and make certain that they have enough to live with dignity and not in poverty. Not against wealth, but certainly if that wealth is gained at the expense of others and results in many have nots, and a small number of haves.

When you look at the example set by the church itself, and organizations like Catholic Services which provides some kind of temporary assistance to something like 8 million people a year, and food to 5 million. Every year 40 million people are treated in Catholic Hospitals, many for free, or reduced fees.

I remember something that happened in South Florida about seven years ago, when the Board of Directors of a Catholic Hospital decided that they were not goinmg to accept people who didnt have health insuranceor some means to pay, and the Board and the Nuns of the Nursing order almost came to blows over that. Ineed not tell you who won, If you have ever had to disagree with a little old nun. They fired the entire board of directors, and ran the business end of things until they could find a more "Catholic and Christian"Board… I had to spend a lot of time in that hospital and I never let the nuns forget that event. We would get a big kick out of it. I cold see tham walloping Donald Trump.

Anyway. I think that there is nothing incompatible with a liberal view and accepting the bible and the church and its traditions as authoratative. In fact, I feel that the church has done itself a great disservice by focusing of much on a few conservative social issues, while putting others on the back burner. Yes, I know that the Church does a lot of charity work, but it has stopped talking about how the comminity of beleivers has an obligation to influence its government on those issues as well as on right to life issues/ The Holy Father has wrtten more encyclicals and letters on social justice tthan on any other topic. I think since he became ill, the various churces in different area of the world have focused on their own issues, and sort of dropped a lot of things the Holy Father indicated were core articles of faith for Catholics. In many places he spoke of Catholics working to direct their governments to deal with issues of social justice as well as right to life issues, and not to simply support those who support anti- aoortion issues but do not deal with issues of removing the death penalty and helping the poor and the sick. In a number of places he sspoke out against the proportionalism that the America Bishops discussed regarding voting in the last presidential election. He was very clear that you just could not quantify evils. That you couldnt say that a Catholic could not focus on one issue like abortion, while paying less attnetion to issues of social justice because more people are effected by abortion.
In any case, that is likely to change a bit soon, anyway.

Well you tell me. I think my definition fits better.


#8

All of the definitions are highly negative which lead me to conclude that they did not come from a Catholic source at all.

And I was right, I clicked on the link in the OP and it went to a highly anti-Catholic page.

So what else is new?


#9

Yes, you are right, nothing but garbage. One of the links talked about how ONLY the epistles written by Paul are signifigant for Christians. What about the words of Jesus found in the gospels?

They are certainly entitled to their opinion (albeit wrong) but I’m so glad I don’t have to confuse myself with any of that again. I’ve found the TRUE CHURCH that the Holy Spirit directs. Thank you Jesus!
CM


#10

I think this kind of categorization is someone simplistic, maybe even demeaning, because it implies people think the same way about EVERYTHING. Just like I won’t vote straight Democrat, Republican, or any other party, my preferences in my faith vary from point to point.

I bet if you took 50 people here, asked each one 50 questions meant to categorize them per above, no two people would have the same answers. So how could you then categorize them into 3-5 categories?


#11

I did not see my choice…FAITHFUL to Rome… :thumbsup:


#12

There is only one kind of Catholic. Those who believe in all the teachings of the Church and who are firmly resolved to follow them (of course we all fail now and then). I guess the best way to describe this would be orthodox or observant. You’re either orthodox/observant or heterodox/unobservant (aka not really Catholic). There is no spectrum of belief we can fall on and still be truly Catholic.


#13

Yes, the site is from an anti-Catholic site, so perhaps its descriptions of Catholicism are a bit inflammatory. How about if I alter those descriptions:

[list]
*]TRADITIONALIST: accepts Vatican II, but believes that the overall effect has been negative
*]*ORTHODOX: **accepts Vatican II, and sees it as fully consistent with previous Councils, though rejects liberal interpretations of Vatican II
*
*]LIBERAL: fully supports Vatican II, unconditionally, especially the idea of opening the windows of Catholicism to the modern world
*]*CHARISMATIC / EVANGELICAL: *emphasize the charisma or gifts of the Holy Spirit, the importance of being baptized in the Holy Spirit, and the Spirit-filled life
*]*CULTURAL: *baptized, married, and buried in the Catholic church – but have little or no concern about spiritual matters
*]POSTMODERNIST: believes that Truth can never be fully communicated with words
[/list]


#14

[quote=Ahimsa]Yes, the site is from an anti-Catholic site, so perhaps its descriptions of Catholicism are a bit inflammatory.
[/quote]

And you were asking us to put ourselves in categories designed by anti-Catholics why?


#15

[quote=Genesis315]And you were asking us to put ourselves in categories designed by anti-Catholics why?
[/quote]

Hmmm…I didn’t think the descriptions were all that inflammatory, but from the responses here, I gather that they were. (I can see how the “liberal” response might be inflammatory, with its talk about replacing the Bible with reason and such, but liberals are a rare breed on this board, and most of them are pretty tolerant anyways…;).)

But my larger point and larger question were indicated (perhaps not so sensitively) in the descriptions: how many of you (1) really, really distrust Vatican II (I’ve seen a few on these boards like that); (2) like Vatican II, but don’t like how it’s been interpreted by liberals; (3) really love Vatican II’s openness to new ideas; (4) are into the Charismatic movement; (5) are Catholic more in a cultural than religious sense; and (6) think that reality is ultimately beyond description.

That’s all.:slight_smile:


#16

[quote=Ahimsa]Hmmm…I didn’t think the descriptions were all that inflammatory, but from the responses here, I gather that they were. (I can see how the “liberal” response might be inflammatory, with its talk about replacing the Bible with reason and such, but liberals are a rare breed on this board, and most of them are pretty tolerant anyways…;).)

But my larger point and larger question were indicated (perhaps not so sensitively) in the descriptions: how many of you (1) really, really distrust Vatican II (I’ve seen a few on these boards like that); (2) like Vatican II, but don’t like how it’s been interpreted by liberals; (3) really love Vatican II’s openness to new ideas; (4) are into the Charismatic movement; (5) are Catholic more in a cultural than religious sense; and (6) think that reality is ultimately beyond description.

That’s all.:slight_smile:
[/quote]

Ah, I see. Quoting anti-Catholic sources is usually not a good idea around these parts:D . I think most people should fall under #2 out of the choices you have just given. I think the phrase “Vatican II’s openness to new ideas” makes #3 no good seeing as we have an unchanging deposit of faith (if by ideas one means doctrines). Things become clearer, but they are never “new.” If it just broadly means ideas in general, even before V2, the Church has always been open to new ideas that are in line with Catholic teaching as long as there is reliable evidence to support them.


#17

[quote=Ahimsa]What type of Catholic are you?
[list]
*]*ULTRATRADITIONALIST: *extremely critical of the changes brought about by Vatican II and wish the church would return to its earlier course.
*]*TRADITIONALIST: *very critical of liberalism and modernism within the church, but they are generally accepting of the reforms found in Vatican II
*]*LIBERAL: *replaced the Bible and church authority with the authority of human reason and personal spiritual experience

*]*CHARISMATIC / EVANGELICAL: *emphasize the charisma or gifts of the Holy Spirit, the importance of being baptized in the Holy Spirit, and the Spirit-filled life
*]*CULTURAL: *baptized, married, and buried in the Catholic church – but have little or no concern about spiritual matters
*]*POSTMODERNIST: *hostile to most anyone who makes claim to objective truth
[/list]
[/quote]

Where’s the position of most Catholics? It’s not one of your choices. Your poll is hoplessly biased. BTW, in addition to including at least the majority options, you might want to make it a proper poll.


#18

[quote=tom.wineman]1st Apostolic Full Gospel Church of Jesus Christ Unreformed Roman Assembly of God
[/quote]

Does this really answer the question?


#19

I don’t think I fall into any of the categories listed. In some ways I am steeped in our traditions, attracted deeply to our spiritual moral and social theology. I think they have the answer to our modern day problems, difficulties etc. In other ways I am quite radical in my thinking I’m told. I view The Church as unfolding, journeying and of course myself . . . and journeying towards truth. At times I am concerned about The Church and then at other times I applaud her. As I hope and believe I will get it together eventually, so I see The Church . . . I see eternity as always present, the now - hence eventually is within eternity which goes without saying.

Obedience to The Church is important to me, but then I don’t think I’ve ever had a conscience issue that brings that obedience into question, which does not mean that at times I do not follow my own conscience. I do subscribe that The Church is a great font and source of wisdom and thus worth listening to carefully on all issues.


#20

There is only one type of Catholic.I can’t see myself on other categories,you are just Catholic,or not.


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