What was Judas' sin?


#1

I have always believed that Jesus condemned Judas for betraying him:

Matthew 26:24 “…But woe to that man by whom the Son of man shall be betrayed. It were better for him, if that man had not been born.”

But, as a Catholic, I also believe the only sin God can’t forgive is against the Holy Spirit. Judas fell into despair:

Matthew 27:5 “And casting down the pieces of silver in the temple, he departed and went and hanged himself with an halter.”

Was his real sin despair? Was Jesus, knowing what Judas would do later, telling him of his despair? Or was Judas’ sin special, in that by betraying Jesus (God), Judas committed a sin against the Holy Spirit.

I don’t care for what if’s, but it applies here: What if Judas had come back to Jesus and asked forgiveness instead of hanging himself?


#2

dispair


#3

Judas and Peter both betrayed Christ.

Judas refused to believe that Christ could forgive Him, Peter repented.

The “sin against the Spirit” that is unforgivable is believing that Christ does not have the power to save and redeem you. God cannot save someone against their will.


#4

[quote=quasimodo]dispair
[/quote]

Correct-o-mundo…Judas did not believe. One reason that the Sacrament of Reconciliation is so important. Through Jesus, there is always hope for us - even though we may fall repeatedly. His Divine Mercy can always save us.


#5

#6

[quote=SAMF]Matthew 26:24 “…But woe to that man by whom the Son of man shall be betrayed. It were better for him, if that man had not been born.”

I was looking for more of a discussion about this passage. Yes, I, too, believe Judas fell into dispair. It’s interesting to note Matthew 26:24 (at least to me, since until recently I thought Jesus condemned Judas for betraying Him) .

We know Jesus knows all men’s hearts, but it isn’t made clear in this passage what Judas was about to do. The implication is that Jesus condemns Judas for the betrayal, not the despair.

[/quote]


#7

[quote=Elzee]I’ve heard this before…how do you know this ? Thanks! Lisa
[/quote]

Matthew 12:31
And so I tell you, every sin and blasphemy will be forgiven men, but the blasphemy against the Spirit will not be forgiven.

Catholic teaching tells us that “sin against the Spirit” is despair, believing that our sin is so bad that we give up on God’s mercy.


#8

Matthew 12:31
And so I tell you, every sin and blasphemy will be forgiven men, but the blasphemy against the Spirit will not be forgiven.

Catholic teaching tells us that “sin against the Spirit” is despair, believing that our sin is so bad that we give up on God’s mercy.

Oh, Dear Lord, this one still grieves me - in my pantheistic idolatry and new-agey relativism, I blasphemed against the Holy Spirit.

I despaired of forgiveness - I used to think of suicide often.

I specifically confessed these sins today (among the dozens I told in my first confession) and recieved absolution.

It seems to me that Jesus is saying here that such sin will not be forgiven. How does the Church interpret this?

Is one unforgiven only as they remain in that state? (Arrogant enough to believe that their sins are greater than the mercy of God) Can penitence and confession and absolution for this sin against the Holy Spirit bring you into a state where it can be forgiven?

Or is it unforgiven, forever?

Thank you,
Elizabeth


#9

[quote=quasimodo]dispair
[/quote]

cough, what??

GRAMMAR POLICE

  • We have a 27957, impersonation of an officer enforcing wrong words.*

its despair! :thumbsup:


#10

According to my priest, the sin of Judas was not the betrayal, it was final despair.


#11

[quote=Magicsilence]cough, what??

GRAMMAR POLICE

  • We have a 27957, impersonation of an officer enforcing wrong words.*

its despair! :thumbsup:
[/quote]

hahaha … dispair: To separate (a pair). I have . . . dispaired two doves.

I can’t spell to save my life. hahaha…shut up. :stuck_out_tongue:


#12

Hi guys!

I always thought Judas’s sin was leaving the table early without being excused. Boy, was I wrong.:o


#13

[quote=ElizabethJoy]Oh, Dear Lord, this one still grieves me - in my pantheistic idolatry and new-agey relativism, I blasphemed against the Holy Spirit.

I despaired of forgiveness - I used to think of suicide often.

I specifically confessed these sins today (among the dozens I told in my first confession) and recieved absolution.

It seems to me that Jesus is saying here that such sin will not be forgiven. How does the Church interpret this?

Is one unforgiven only as they remain in that state? (Arrogant enough to believe that their sins are greater than the mercy of God) Can penitence and confession and absolution for this sin against the Holy Spirit bring you into a state where it can be forgiven?

Or is it unforgiven, forever?

Thank you,
Elizabeth
[/quote]

Fear not … it did not become who you are or you would not be where you are now. It was a shallow phase through which you passed and have emerged. Salvation is a process of becoming … becoming a child of God.

I have heard the Fundamentalists often pose the question: " when you die, and God asks you why he should let you into heaven, what will you say?" As though salvation was some sort of quiz…indeed.

No, it will be closer to: the Father will say “come in Good and faithful servant, you remind me of my Son” or “depart from me , I do not know you.”


#14

“Can” makes me think, all things are possible with God.

Or is it unforgiven, forever?

Don’t presume to speak for the Lord or think like Him but it’s hard to see how this would be to His advantage or yours. His will be done on earth and heaven.

Do what I do. I use the mentally ill defense. “Well, I just wasn’t thinking straight, under all that evil influence.” In my case, I could get a doctor to back me up in writing if need be. :whacky:

It doesn’t make it easier maybe, but it really is true. You are obviously in a different state of mind and have a whole different consciousness about it. It’s like you put that old person to death and decided to choose life or something. :thumbsup:

How can God not like that – rejoicing over the lost that has been found. Never abandoned, but now accepting. Kill the fatted calf, and all that. :dancing:

Alan


#15

Thank you, quasimodo and AlanFromWichita.

After my confession and absolution, I think the evil one was throwing a temper tantrum - I had terrible doubts creeping in about the validity of my confession and even the validity of the absolution.

It’s occurred to me that it would be such a victory for the evil one if my doubts won and I were cast back into despair - especially after finding all of this hope and forgiveness and freshness. Darkness is so much darker after you’ve been out in the light.

Thank you for helping me. I was worried, but you’re right - I am not who I was and God can do anything.

Elizabeth


#16

[quote=Elzee]I’ve heard this before…how do you know this ? Thanks! Lisa
[/quote]

I don’t think I’m sure what you’re asking. Are you asking how we know Peter repented? or how we know Judas’ sin was despair? etc…


#17

[quote=SAMF]I have always believed that Jesus condemned Judas for betraying him:

Matthew 26:24 “…But woe to that man by whom the Son of man shall be betrayed. It were better for him, if that man had not been born.”

But, as a Catholic, I also believe the only sin God can’t forgive is against the Holy Spirit. Judas fell into despair:

Matthew 27:5 “And casting down the pieces of silver in the temple, he departed and went and hanged himself with an halter.”

Was his real sin despair? Was Jesus, knowing what Judas would do later, telling him of his despair? Or was Judas’ sin special, in that by betraying Jesus (God), Judas committed a sin against the Holy Spirit.

I don’t care for what if’s, but it applies here: What if Judas had come back to Jesus and asked forgiveness instead of hanging himself?
[/quote]

Your last question makes the ultimate point: Christ would have forgiven him. His sin was resistance to grace, to death.

Did you know that one of the Near Death Experiencers claims to have met Judas in Hell?


#18

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