What will be the experience of the body, sexuality, and "marriage" for eschatological man?

I once read that even though the resurrected body did not need food to survive, there would be food as a means of fellowship and of experiencing the universe via our taste buds. Similarly, even though there’s no need for reproduction, there would be sex between “spouses” for intimacy, bonding and mutual delight.

Will there still be romance in heaven? It’s possible that men and women will still fall in love with each other? Marriage is a representation of the relationship between Jesus and His bride (the Church), and is a bond where we share God’s love with each other - we will see Christ’s love in each others eyes. So what if there will be “marriage” and sex in Heaven as an eternal reminder of Christ’s love for the Church?.

Because sexuality is a gift between spouses and there is no marriage in Heaven, methinks there will be no sexual behavior, as such, in Heaven.

ICXC NIKA

This quote is referring to Pope John Paul II:

“He sees in the simultaneous orgasm of loving spouses a uniquely intense moment of the communion of persons. And in that action, he sees not only the epitome of married love, but a kind of model of what all of human life should be — ecstatic and passionate reciprocal self-abandon.” [14]

  1. See “Marriage and Marital Intercourse” in Wojtyla, Love and Responsibility, pp. 270-78. Here Professor Wojtyla recommends to Christian spouses an effort to achieve simultaneous orgasm and even the use of a sex therapist, should such help be needed, for this orgasmic communion of persons is the heart of the sacrament of matrimony."

So it seems to me that mutual sexual climax is just a small foretaste of what Heaven will be like. It’s a place of eternal ecstasy and union with God that we can only get a small glimpse of here on earth.

Matt 22:30 is certainly a difficult passage to understand outside of the traditional reading. Some have suggested that Jesus does not refer to an abolition of marriage but rather a change in how it functions and comes about socially. John Kilgallen a catholic scholar has held for a long time, there would be marriage in the resurrection. “Though Jesus does not say who wife the widow will be in the next life, it is reasonable to assume she will be the wife of the first husband, whose life was ended here, but will continue forever (with her) in the resurrected life.” The woman who was the wife of the seven brothers did not marry the seven brothers. She married the first and was given to the six in order to procreate children in the name of the first. All their children would be credited to her first husband who was her true love and spouse. According to Ben Witherington, Jesus silence, regarding “existing marriages” that only levirate marriages will be dissolved at the resurrection. Is possible that we won’t get married and given in marriage, but will be in a state of perfect oneness (a state of marriage without having to enter into covenant.)? The Bible says the law is not necessary in Heaven, however, it does not say that we will not still have that union. Is possible that we will still have partners in Heaven but in a perfect way just as Adam and Eve were before the fall?. The divine declaration was that it was “not good for the man to be alone” Gen 2:18 The text reveals that God and the man enjoyed a genuine, interactive relationship in the pristine environment of the garden but God had created man as a relational being a being with capacity for a relationship with God, as well as a capacity, indeed, need for relationship with others like himself.

New Testament scholar Ben Witherington puts it this way:
The case put forward by the Sadducees is particularly extreme. Not only had six brothers attempted and failed to impregnate the woman in question, but she had also outlived them all and was single when she died. It is perhaps this last fact which prompts the question: Whose spouse will she be in the resurrection? …Jesus stresses that in the age to come people will neither marry nor be given in marriage. Notice what Jesus does not say. He does not say there will be no marriage in the age to come. The use of the terms “γαμουσιν” (gamousin) and “γαμιζονται” (gamizontai) is important, for these terms refer to the gender-specific roles played in early Jewish society by the man and the woman in the process of getting married. The men, being the initiators of the process in such a strongly patriarchal culture, “marry,” while the women are “given in marriage” by their father or another older family member. Thus Mark has Jesus saying that no new marriages will be initiated in the eschatological [resurrection] state. This is surely not the same as claiming that all existing marriages will disappear in the eschatological state. Jesus, then, would seem to be arguing against a specific view held by the Sadducees about the continuity between this life and the life to come, a view involving the ongoing practice of levirate marriage. In the eschatological state we have resurrected beings who are no longer able to die. Levirate marriage existed precisely because of the reality of death. When death ceases to happen, the rationale for levirate marriage falls to the ground as well. When Jesus says…that people will be like the angels in heaven in the life to come, he does not mean they will live a sexless identity (early Jews did not think angels were sexless in any case; cf. Gen. 6:1–4!), but rather that they will be like angels in that they are unable to die. Thus the question of the Sadducees is inappropriate to the conditions of the eschatological state…In Mark 10 Jesus grounded normal marriage in the creation order, not in the order of the fall, which is the case with levirate marriage (instituted because of death and childlessness and the need to preserve the family name and line). Thus Jesus is intending to deny about the eschatological state “that there will be any natural relation out of which the difficulty of the Sadducees could arise.”

So God created man as male and female to rule over creation and to reflect His image before the Fall when man enjoyed a genuine, interactive relationship with God in the pristine environment of the garden. Even so God had created man as a relational being a being with capacity for a relationship with God, as well as a capacity, indeed, need for relationship with others like himself. Male and female together were to reflect God’s image in the original creation. It’s possible that a restoration of the original male and female romance makes sense based on Acts 3:21 and other passages that speak of God restoring things to His original intent?

Will there still be romance in heaven? It’s possible that men and women will still fall in love with each other? Marriage is a representation of the relationship between Jesus and His bride (the Church), and is a bond where we share God’s love with each other - we will see Christ’s love in each others eyes. So what if there will be “marriage” and sex in Heaven as an eternal reminder of Christ’s love for the Church?

Matt 22:30 is certainly a difficult passage to understand outside of the traditional reading. Some have suggested that Jesus does not refer to an abolition of marriage but rather a change in how it functions and comes about socially. John Kilgallen a catholic scholar has held for a long time, there would be marriage in the resurrection. “Though Jesus does not say who wife the widow will be in the next life, it is reasonable to assume she will be the wife of the first husband, whose life was ended here, but will continue forever (with her) in the resurrected life.” The woman who was the wife of the seven brothers did not marry the seven brothers. She married the first and was given to the six in order to procreate children in the name of the first. All their children would be credited to her first husband who was her true love and spouse. According to Ben Witherington, Jesus silence, regarding “existing marriages” that only levirate marriages will be dissolved at the resurrection. Is possible that we won’t get married and given in marriage, but will be in a state of perfect oneness (a state of marriage without having to enter into covenant.)? The Bible says the law is not necessary in Heaven, however, it does not say that we will not still have that union. Is possible that we will still have partners in Heaven but in a perfect way just as Adam and Eve were before the fall?. The divine declaration was that it was “not good for the man to be alone” Gen 2:18 The text reveals that God and the man enjoyed a genuine, interactive relationship in the pristine environment of the garden but God had created man as a relational being a being with capacity for a relationship with God, as well as a capacity, indeed, need for relationship with others like himself.

New Testament scholar Ben Witherington puts it this way:
The case put forward by the Sadducees is particularly extreme. Not only had six brothers attempted and failed to impregnate the woman in question, but she had also outlived them all and was single when she died. It is perhaps this last fact which prompts the question: Whose spouse will she be in the resurrection? …Jesus stresses that in the age to come people will neither marry nor be given in marriage. Notice what Jesus does not say. He does not say there will be no marriage in the age to come. The use of the terms “γαμουσιν” (gamousin) and “γαμιζονται” (gamizontai) is important, for these terms refer to the gender-specific roles played in early Jewish society by the man and the woman in the process of getting married. The men, being the initiators of the process in such a strongly patriarchal culture, “marry,” while the women are “given in marriage” by their father or another older family member. Thus Mark has Jesus saying that no new marriages will be initiated in the eschatological [resurrection] state. This is surely not the same as claiming that all existing marriages will disappear in the eschatological state. Jesus, then, would seem to be arguing against a specific view held by the Sadducees about the continuity between this life and the life to come, a view involving the ongoing practice of levirate marriage. In the eschatological state we have resurrected beings who are no longer able to die. Levirate marriage existed precisely because of the reality of death. When death ceases to happen, the rationale for levirate marriage falls to the ground as well. When Jesus says…that people will be like the angels in heaven in the life to come, he does not mean they will live a sexless identity (early Jews did not think angels were sexless in any case; cf. Gen. 6:1–4!), but rather that they will be like angels in that they are unable to die. Thus the question of the Sadducees is inappropriate to the conditions of the eschatological state…In Mark 10 Jesus grounded normal marriage in the creation order, not in the order of the fall, which is the case with levirate marriage (instituted because of death and childlessness and the need to preserve the family name and line). Thus Jesus is intending to deny about the eschatological state “that there will be any natural relation out of which the difficulty of the Sadducees could arise.”

So God created man as male and female to rule over creation and to reflect His image before the Fall when man enjoyed a genuine, interactive relationship with God in the pristine environment of the garden. Even so God had created man as a relational being a being with capacity for a relationship with God, as well as a capacity, indeed, need for relationship with others like himself. Male and female together were to reflect God’s image in the original creation. It’s possible that a restoration of the original male and female romance makes sense based on Acts 3:21 and other passages that speak of God restoring things to His original intent?

Matt 22:30 is certainly a difficult passage to understand outside of the traditional reading. Some have suggested that Jesus does not refer to an abolition of marriage but rather a change in how it functions and comes about socially. John Kilgallen a catholic scholar has held for a long time, there would be marriage in the resurrection. “Though Jesus does not say who wife the widow will be in the next life, it is reasonable to assume she will be the wife of the first husband, whose life was ended here, but will continue forever (with her) in the resurrected life.” The woman who was the wife of the seven brothers did not marry the seven brothers. She married the first and was given to the six in order to procreate children in the name of the first. All their children would be credited to her first husband who was her true love and spouse. According to Ben Witherington, Jesus silence, regarding “existing marriages” that only levirate marriages will be dissolved at the resurrection. Is possible that we won’t get married and given in marriage, but will be in a state of perfect oneness (a state of marriage without having to enter into covenant.)? The Bible says the law is not necessary in Heaven, however, it does not say that we will not still have that union. Is possible that we will still have partners in Heaven but in a perfect way just as Adam and Eve were before the fall?. The divine declaration was that it was “not good for the man to be alone” Gen 2:18 The text reveals that God and the man enjoyed a genuine, interactive relationship in the pristine environment of the garden but God had created man as a relational being a being with capacity for a relationship with God, as well as a capacity, indeed, need for relationship with others like himself.

New Testament scholar Ben Witherington puts it this way:
The case put forward by the Sadducees is particularly extreme. Not only had six brothers attempted and failed to impregnate the woman in question, but she had also outlived them all and was single when she died. It is perhaps this last fact which prompts the question: Whose spouse will she be in the resurrection? …Jesus stresses that in the age to come people will neither marry nor be given in marriage. Notice what Jesus does not say. He does not say there will be no marriage in the age to come. The use of the terms “γαμουσιν” (gamousin) and “γαμιζονται” (gamizontai) is important, for these terms refer to the gender-specific roles played in early Jewish society by the man and the woman in the process of getting married. The men, being the initiators of the process in such a strongly patriarchal culture, “marry,” while the women are “given in marriage” by their father or another older family member. Thus Mark has Jesus saying that no new marriages will be initiated in the eschatological [resurrection] state. This is surely not the same as claiming that all existing marriages will disappear in the eschatological state. Jesus, then, would seem to be arguing against a specific view held by the Sadducees about the continuity between this life and the life to come, a view involving the ongoing practice of levirate marriage. In the eschatological state we have resurrected beings who are no longer able to die. Levirate marriage existed precisely because of the reality of death. When death ceases to happen, the rationale for levirate marriage falls to the ground as well. When Jesus says…that people will be like the angels in heaven in the life to come, he does not mean they will live a sexless identity (early Jews did not think angels were sexless in any case; cf. Gen. 6:1–4!), but rather that they will be like angels in that they are unable to die. Thus the question of the Sadducees is inappropriate to the conditions of the eschatological state…In Mark 10 Jesus grounded normal marriage in the creation order, not in the order of the fall, which is the case with levirate marriage (instituted because of death and childlessness and the need to preserve the family name and line). Thus Jesus is intending to deny about the eschatological state “that there will be any natural relation out of which the difficulty of the Sadducees could arise.”

So God created man as male and female to rule over creation and to reflect His image before the Fall when man enjoyed a genuine, interactive relationship with God in the pristine environment of the garden. Even so God had created man as a relational being a being with capacity for a relationship with God, as well as a capacity, indeed, need for relationship with others like himself. Male and female together were to reflect God’s image in the original creation. It’s possible that a restoration of the original male and female romance makes sense based on Acts 3:21 and other passages that speak of God restoring things to His original intent?

Mark 12:25: “When the dead rise, they will neither marry nor be given in marriage; they will be like the angels in heaven.”

Those are the words of Jesus and not at all difficult to understand. There will be no marriage in heaven and no sex. There will be no need for either. That doesn’t mean you won’t share love with whose you knew here on earth. We probably will, but not sexual love.

Jesus did not address romance in heaven, but I would think with no marriage, there would be no romance.

I am sure heaven will provide far more “delights” than sex could ever provide in a million years.

And yet Jesus remained unmarried and chaste and both Jesus and St. Paul said the unmarried state was higher than the married and urged people to embrace it if they could.

Exactly.

There is no marriage or sex in Heaven.

Please note that the marriage vow is ‘Until Death’. So even if we had only a single spouse, in a christian marriage, the marriage would end with death.

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