What're the differences between the Latin Rite and the various Eastern Rites?

Besides the Eastern Rite’s lack of celibacy.

The Latin rite has unleavened bread, the easterners have leavened.

Eastern rite priests all have beards, Latin rite priests are allowed to be clean shaven.

Eastern rite folks stand when Latin folks traditionally kneel.

Eastern rite folks do the sign of the cross backwards.

The Eastern rites give confirmation and communion to infants.

The Eastern rites put onion domes on the outside of their churches and icons on the inside.

There is a start for you, there are more.

[quote=Kielbasi]The Latin rite has unleavened bread, the easterners have leavened.

Eastern rite priests all have beards, Latin rite priests are allowed to be clean shaven.

Eastern rite folks stand when Latin folks traditionally kneel.

Eastern rite folks do the sign of the cross backwards.

The Eastern rites give confirmation and communion to infants.

The Eastern rites put onion domes on the outside of their churches and icons on the inside.

There is a start for you, there are more.
[/quote]

Nope.

MANY Eastern Catholic priests (even bishops) do not have beards.

It’s Latin-Rite Catholics that “do the sign of the cross backwards” – we screwed this up by trying to copy the priest who was facing us.

Most Eastern Catholic church buildings do NOT use onions. It’s not a part of the Greek Catholic or Byzantine-Ruthenian Catholic heritage to name just two Eastern Catholic Churches.

When if comes to celebacy keep in mind that ALL Eastern Catholic bishops must be celibate – just like the Orthodox.

Kielbasi:

Some of the Eastern Rite Priests on EWTN do NOT have beards. That being said, I believe the beard is a sign of Fatherhood, and the leavening a sign of Christ’s Resurrection.

Although Married men in the Eastern Rites are allowed to Be Ordained as Priests, only men who have taken a vow of celebacy and are thereby 'dedicated to the Lord" may be Consecrated as Bishops or Metropolitans.

Eastern Rite Catholics (and Eastern Orthodox) do kneel Monday through Saturday, but “Prostration” (Kneeling) is forbidden on Sundays to Commemorate our Lord’s Resurrection…

[quote=Kielbasi]The Latin rite has unleavened bread, the easterners have leavened.

Eastern rite priests all have beards, Latin rite priests are allowed to be clean shaven.

Eastern rite folks stand when Latin folks traditionally kneel.

Eastern rite folks do the sign of the cross backwards.

The Eastern rites give confirmation and communion to infants.

The Eastern rites put onion domes on the outside of their churches and icons on the inside.

There is a start for you, there are more.
[/quote]

…Eastern Rite Catholics would claim we westerners do the Sign of the Cross backwards - They do it three times, once for the Father, once for the Son and once for the Holy Spirit. (we have an Eastern Orthodox who occasionally takes his communion at St. Mary’s - He has some sort of dispensation from his Bishop)

Confirmation (Chrismation) is not regarded as given an indellible Mark on the soul and can be given multiple times. That’s why converts or those who have been apostate can simply be Re-Chrismated.

Icons and their veneration are described in the canons of the same councel (Chalcedon) which defined the Blessed Virgin Mary as the Theotokos. Eastern Christians believe the Saint represented in the Icon mystically resides in that Icon. This is based on the Eastern concept described by the Greek word “Symbol”. So, if the Icon is one of the Theotokos, Eastern Catholics would say that the Theotokos resides, not only in heaven with her Son, but in that Icon.

That’s why an Eastern Catholic would fall on his knees (except on Sunday) and gently kiss the statue to demonstrate his love of the Theotokos.

We do the same with the cross on Good Friday.

Fr. Ambrose and many of the Eastern Rite Catholics can describe this better than I can.

In Christ, Michael

You might want to move this to the eastern forum.

[quote=mgy100]You might want to move this to the eastern forum.
[/quote]

It doesn’t say “Latin Liturgy and Sacraments” at the top of the page.

In fact, the “choose your forum wisely” perma-post specifically states that this is the forum for questions on the Divine Liturgy, which is Eastern.

My vote is for leaving this here. Catholic is Catholic is Catholic. Moving every single thread that mentions the East is causing some very serious upset for some of us, espescially Eastern Catholics.

Just my :twocents:

[quote=Traditional Ang]…we have an Eastern Orthodox who occasionally takes his communion at St. Mary’s - He has some sort of dispensation from his Bishop

[/quote]

I thought the EO dont consider any nonEO Church to hold a valid Eucharist, the Catholic Church doesnt even consider the Anglicans to have a valid Eucharist. Are you Anglican, Catholic, or EO?

[quote=Catholic Dude]I thought the EO dont consider any nonEO Church to hold a valid Eucharist, the Catholic Church doesnt even consider the Anglicans to have a valid Eucharist. Are you Anglican, Catholic, or EO?
[/quote]

I think (from his name) that he’s a member of the Traditional Anglican Communion. The TAC broke off from the Anglican Communion over issues such as women’s ordination, and too much protestant influence within the Anglican Communion. They have valid succession going back to Europe’s Old Catholics, and are currently seeking communion with Rome. For a church not in communion with Rome, the TAC is about as orthodox (small o) as you can get. When he says “St. Mary’s”, I’m not sure if that’s an Anglican church or not though…

[quote=Kielbasi]Eastern rite priests all have beards, Latin rite priests are allowed to be clean shaven.
[/quote]

Not necissarily, beards are manditory for monastic communities. Even the Eastern Orthodox parish priests don’t all have beards.

[quote=Kielbasi]The Eastern rites put onion domes on the outside of their churches and icons on the inside.
[/quote]

That is only prominent in Slavic lands, Byzantine Catholics in Greece will traditionally have a Greek Cross shaped church with a large dome in the center. The interior pretty much remains the same.

[quote=FuzzyBunny116]Besides the Eastern Rite’s lack of celibacy.
[/quote]

Eastern Catholic Churches do not “lack celibacy” in their clergy. The discipline of Ordination is just slightly different.

[quote=Kielbasi]The Latin rite has unleavened bread, the easterners have leavened…
[/quote]

Some Eastern Catholic Churches use unlevened.

[quote=Kielbasi]Eastern rite priests all have beards, Latin rite priests are allowed to be clean shaven…
[/quote]

Some do and some don’t

[quote=Kielbasi]Eastern rite folks stand when Latin folks traditionally kneel…
[/quote]

Some Eastern Catholic Churches also kneel

[quote=Kielbasi]Eastern rite folks do the sign of the cross backwards…
[/quote]

This is common to all

[quote=Kielbasi]The Eastern rites put onion domes on the outside of their churches and icons on the inside…
[/quote]

The “Onion” actually represents a flame. Icons are common to all Eastern Churches.

[quote=Catholic Dude]I thought the EO dont consider any nonEO Church to hold a valid Eucharist, the Catholic Church doesnt even consider the Anglicans to have a valid Eucharist. Are you Anglican, Catholic, or EO?
[/quote]

Eastern Orthodox will generally not allow Eastern or Western Catholics to receive Holy Communion at their Divine Liturgy. However They are welcome to receive at Eastern Catholic Divine Liturgy or a Roman Rite Mass. However their discipline requires that they must have their Bishops permission to do so.

[quote=Psalm45:9]Not necissarily, beards are manditory for monastic communities. Even the Eastern Orthodox parish priests don’t all have beards.

[/quote]

This really depends on the typicon of the monastery, or rule for you Latins.

I am not aware of this requirement for the Byzantine Franscians or the Byzantine Benedictines but then I guess we could argue that they are not truly Byzantine monasteries.

We only have one monastery in the Byzantine (Ruthenian for those of you fixated on ethnicity) Catholic Church and its typicon does require a beard.

There are many Orthodox and some Byzantine Catholics out there that believe that all males should have beards, that it is a sign of orthodoxy.

There are many differences between the Latin rite and the other rites. I can only speak to the Byzantine rite. The biggest difference is our approach to theology.

Here are a couple of differences off the top of my head.

We still use the office of sub-deacon. All those to be ordained to the diaconate, either permanent or transitional, will be ordained a sub-deacon first.

Deacons can not bless, baptize, or preside at a marriage.

Deacons have, roughly, 80% (or so I have heard said) of the audible prayers of the clergy at the Divine Liturgy.

Deacons are addressed as “Father Deacon”.

Monastics are addressed as “Father” after they finish the novitiate.

The Mystery (this is what we call the Sacraments) of Crowning (this is what we call Marriage) is confered by the priest, not the couple. This is why a deacon does not preside.

The Mysteries of initiation are done at the same time, again this is why a deacon does not administer baptism. So an infant is baptized, chrismated (confirmed), and then recieves first Eucharist at the Divine Liturgy immediately following.

Priests are the regular minister of Chrismation.

Thats just off the top of my head.

I agree with Ghosty. This thread should stay here. Some people seem to think that we should be contained in a ghetto and no Eastern Catholic questions should be asked out side of that ghetto sub-forum. I am against that.

This thread is about Catholic Liturgy & Sacraments. Not about Eastern Christianity.

[quote=Semper Fi]I think (from his name) that he’s a member of the** Traditional Anglican Communion**. The TAC broke off from the Anglican Communion over issues such as women’s ordination, and too much protestant influence within the Anglican Communion. They have valid succession going back to Europe’s Old Catholics, and are currently seeking communion with Rome. For a church not in communion with Rome, the TAC is about as orthodox (small o) as you can get. When he says “St. Mary’s”, I’m not sure if that’s an Anglican church or not though…
[/quote]

The Catholic Church would consider this group to be Protestant.

[quote=Traditional Ang]Kielbasi:

Some of the Eastern Rite Priests on EWTN do NOT have beards. That being said, I believe the beard is a sign of Fatherhood, and the leavening a sign of Christ’s Resurrection.

Although Married men in the Eastern Rites are allowed to Be Ordained as Priests, only men who have taken a vow of celebacy and are thereby 'dedicated to the Lord" may be Consecrated as Bishops or Metropolitans.

Eastern Rite Catholics (and Eastern Orthodox) do kneel Monday through Saturday, but “Prostration” (Kneeling) is forbidden on Sundays to Commemorate our Lord’s Resurrection…

…Eastern Rite Catholics would claim we westerners do the Sign of the Cross backwards - They do it three times, once for the Father, once for the Son and once for the Holy Spirit. (we have an Eastern Orthodox who occasionally takes his communion at St. Mary’s - He has some sort of dispensation from his Bishop)

  1. Confirmation (Chrismation) is not regarded as given an indellible Mark on the soul and can be given multiple times. That’s why converts or those who have been apostate can simply be Re-Chrismated.

Icons and their veneration are described in the canons of the same councel (Chalcedon) which defined the Blessed Virgin Mary as the Theotokos. Eastern Christians believe the Saint represented in the Icon mystically resides in that Icon. This is based on the Eastern concept described by the Greek word “Symbol”. So, if the Icon is one of the Theotokos, Eastern Catholics would say that the Theotokos resides, not only in heaven with her Son, but in that Icon.

  1. That’s why an Eastern Catholic would fall on his knees (except on Sunday) and gently kiss the statue to demonstrate his love of the Theotokos.

We do the same with the cross on Good Friday.

Fr. Ambrose and many of the Eastern Rite Catholics can describe this better than I can.

In Christ, Michael
[/quote]

1.) Nix.

2.) No graven images in the Eastern Catholic churches.

[quote=Br. Rich SFO]Some Eastern Catholic Churches also kneel
[/quote]

That is a Latinization, ie not part of the Eastern Tradition.

[quote=Br. Rich SFO]The “Onion” actually represents a flame. Icons are common to all Eastern Churches.
[/quote]

Does the flame represent the descent of the Holy Spirit?

[quote=Psalm45:9]That is a Latinization, ie not part of the Eastern Tradition.

Does the flame represent the descent of the Holy Spirit?
[/quote]

It was explained to me that it represented Christ as the Light of the world. On the inside of the dome looking up inside is a icon of Christ in all the Eastern churches I have been in.

Thanks AltarMan, I didn’t see this the first time I skimmed though this thread.

This is incorrect. First, Byzantine Catholics, even Eastern Catholics if you want to lump us all together, are Catholics.

This Chrismation, is not the same as the Mystery of Christmation (Confirmation). It is an annointing. We have many annointings thoughout the Liturgical year in the Byzantine rite.

Confirmation does give an indellible Mark and like baptism, can only occur once.

[quote=AltarMan]The Catholic Church would consider this group to be Protestant.
[/quote]

when did i say they weren’t?

After discussion between myself and Marian Carroll, the Moderator of L&S, we have decided that the question posed here would by the OP would get more thoroughly and appropriately addressed in the Eastern Christianity forum, to which I’m moving it.

Joe

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