When did Jesus lay Mosaic Law aside?


#1

Mark 7:18-20
New International Version (NIV)
18 “Are you so dull?” he asked. “Don’t you see that nothing that enters a person from the outside can defile them? 19 For it doesn’t go into their heart but into their stomach, and then out of the body.” (In saying this, Jesus declared all foods clean.)

Good morning!

This was my ‘quote for today’ on the ‘Jesus Daily’ app. As is my habit; I looked it up and found that this passage is difficult for Jewish people, as it looks like Jesus is putting aside the ban on unclean foods, like pork.

Looking at the different commentaries, one fellow on the judaismvschristianity site said that Christians believe that Jesus put aside the Mosaic law banning unclean foods at this point but also believe that Mosaic law was ultimately ended upon Jesus’ death. He said that this passage reflected Mark’s opinion; not Jesus’.

I must admit that this is news to me. I am learning a lot from my little app and my Ignatius Catholic Study Bible (thank you Fr. Serpa for recommending that book!!) but I’m not sure what to think of this passage in the light of what the Jewish commentator said. Is there a contradiction? I’m ashamed of my ignorance but would be delighted to read whatever anyone might say on the matter.

Thanking you in advance,

Jenny


#2

It’s not so much that it’s Mark’s opinion, as that Mark is writing for a predominantly non-Jewish audience (he was St. Peter’s assistant). That’s why he explains the laws about ritual cleanliness in Mark 7, and explains the meaning of Jesus’ words about food.

However, there’s also the passage in Matthew 9 where Christ quotes Hosea: “I will have mercy, not sacrifice.” This is implicitly a rejection of the sacrificial cult of Temple Judaism.

Besides, when He is touched by a woman who is ritually unclean (Matthew 9; Mark 5; Luke 8), he does not ask her to purify herself (or go wash); rather, he declares her healed.

A further passage of note is His apparition to St. Peter in Acts 10 (“What God has declared clean, you must not declare unclean”.)

Also, most exegetes distinguish between the moral aspects of the Mosaic Law, such as the Ten Commandments (which Christ does not abolish - rather, He raises them to a higher level in passages such as Matthew 5) and the ceremonial aspects - laws on food, dress, etc. which He has abrogated.


#3

Thank you SO much! I thought as much myself but looking at that website threw me.

I’d best finish my bible studies before I go fishing for confusion again! Thank you for your kind reply. :slight_smile:


#4

Jesus set aside the ceremonial law, the law of clean vs unclean. Those were established in the desert in response to the unfaithfulness of the Jews in regards to the golden calf.

Jews prior to that had no dietary restrictions (Gen 9:1-3)

The moral law however, remains, and always will


#5

You’re welcome! :slight_smile:

The New Jerusalem Bible New Testament is also a good study resource, and I’ve learned a lot from it. (The OT is a bit “iffy”, because it follows a more “historical-critical approach”. I’ve seen the NT being sold as a stand-alone volume, though.)


#6

=mrsjennymulhall;11867956]Mark 7:18-20
New International Version (NIV)
18 “Are you so dull?” he asked. “Don’t you see that nothing that enters a person from the outside can defile them? 19 For it doesn’t go into their heart but into their stomach, and then out of the body.” (In saying this, Jesus declared all foods clean.)

Good morning!

This was my ‘quote for today’ on the ‘Jesus Daily’ app. As is my habit; I looked it up and found that this passage is difficult for Jewish people, as it looks like Jesus is putting aside the ban on unclean foods, like pork.

Looking at the different commentaries, one fellow on the judaismvschristianity site said that Christians believe that Jesus put aside the Mosaic law banning unclean foods at this point but also believe that Mosaic law was ultimately ended upon Jesus’ death. He said that this passage reflected Mark’s opinion; not Jesus’.

I must admit that this is news to me. I am learning a lot from my little app and my Ignatius Catholic Study Bible (thank you Fr. Serpa for recommending that book!!) but I’m not sure what to think of this passage in the light of what the Jewish commentator said. Is there a contradiction? I’m ashamed of my ignorance but would be delighted to read whatever anyone might say on the matter.

Thanking you in advance,

Jenny

Hi Jenny,
Thanks for asking.
Matt.5: 17 -18 "Think not that I have come to abolish the law and the prophets; I have come not to abolish them but to fulfil them. For truly, I say to you, till heaven and earth pass away, not an iota, not a dot, will pass from the law until all is accomplished.”

There is a danger, a risk in culling any single verse or passage and trying to get from it the true and rightful meaning.

Here’s a RULE for right understanding of the bible that might be helpful?

[Caps for emphasis, not shouting]

“Never ever can, may or DOES
One verse, passage, or teaching
Have the power or authority
To make void, invalidate or override
Another verse, passage or teaching”
Were this even the slightest possibility [IT”S NOT], it would render the entire bible as worthless to teach or learn the faith
.

So you did GOOD in asking for a clairification.

So the way to understand this, is that for Jews; the Law still binds, but for Christians, now under a New Covenant [which overrides BUT does not void the previous Covenant], Christ is teaching that ALL foods are “clean” [except those sacrificed to other gods].

John 1:7 "For the law was given through Moses; grace and truth came through Jesus" Christ

Romans 6:14 "For sin will have no dominion over you, since you are not under law but under grace"

Hope this helps you Jenny,
God Bless,
Patrick


#7

Thanks Paddy!

Nice to meet another Gael here. :slight_smile: Dia a bheith in éineacht leat!!


#8

=mrsjennymulhall;11868882]Thanks Paddy!

Nice to meet another Gael here. :slight_smile: Dia a bheith in éineacht leat!!

Your VERY welcome:D


#9

I’m using somebody’s else’s new computer and thefont is so small, I couldn’t understand the previous posts.

I think the Old Testament was closed and the Law was finished when Christ died on the cross, saying “it is finished.”

Although Jesus gave a lot of indications that the law was ending. He first did this by showing how the modern, incompetent interpretations of the Law were ending, like when He healed on the Sabbath or when his disciples pulled some corn from a field and ate it.

Jesus and his disciples did those things, because priests of the Siinai covenant used to work on the Sabbath, so they were doing no more than the others, althought it didn not appear to the casual observer.

Scott Hahn points out in his essay in Vol 8 of the Letter and Spirit joural, that Jesus’ death on the cross was the — THE – repayment ot God for the Israelites violation of the Sinai covenant, which had been broken. Breaking a covenant meant that someone had to die, someone who made the covenant. Well, Jesus represented all those who had broken the covenant. The covenant was “fulfilled” when Jesus died to rapay for the Israelites breaking of the old covenant.

But, his death was also the sign of the new Covenant. In fact, the New Testament referred not to a book, but to the sacrifice of Jesus on the cross.


#10

I believe it was the coming of the holy spirit - the Lord the giver of life - that changed everything - where as the sacrifices cleansed the flesh - ashes and blood - the Holy spirit now cleanses the human being in spirit - the sacrifices are no longer needed - the flesh will always be corupt and can never be cleansed and would require continued sacrifice - but now we all have the Holy Spirit within us who Jesus sent when he entered heaven. It is our heart and soul that is cleansed now through Christ sacrifice and the Holy Spirit not our body.


#11

=hu324b;11871582]I believe it was the coming of the holy spirit - the Lord the giver of life - that changed everything - where as the sacrifices cleansed the flesh - ashes and blood - the Holy spirit now cleanses the human being in spirit - the sacrifices are no longer needed - the flesh will always be corupt and can never be cleansed and would require continued sacrifice - but now we all have the Holy Spirit within us who Jesus sent when he entered heaven. It is our heart and soul that is cleansed now through Christ sacrifice and the Holy Spirit not our body.

You’re party correct:)

OT sacrifices are no longer sufficient. BUT NOW there are the NT sacrifices: They are no less real and extremely important.

Take Up your Cross and Follow Me

Phil.2: 8 “And being found in human form he humbled himself and became obedient unto death, even death on a cross Luke.9 :23 And he said to all, "If any man would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross daily and follow me. Mark.8: 34 And he called to him the multitude with his disciples, and said to them, "If any man would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me. Luke.9: 23 And he said to all, "If any man would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross daily and follow me. Luke.14: 7 ***Whoever does not bear his own cross and come after me, cannot be my disciple.” ***

God Bless you,
Patrick


#12

A portion of the law has been passing away since New Testament times Hebrews 8:13 In speaking of a new covenant he treats the first as obsolete. And what is becoming obsolete and growing old is ready to vanish away. But there was/is a transition period, at least until the destruction of the Temple in 70AD where both viewpoints were valid. Still nothing has passed away without it being fulfilled Matt 5:18.
Grace and peace,
Bruce


#13

Jesus did not lay Mosaic Law aside; He fulfilled it.


#14

Thank you everyone for your kind replies. I’m fairly late in my faith to be looking into these things but this question really perplexed me.

I knew the first covenant was fulfilled with the words ‘it is finished’ on the cross (I listen to a lot of audiobooks and Brant Pitted and Scott Hahn are my favourites) but I suppose I just confused myself by looking at Jewish commentary on that bible passage.

I think I had better know my own faith inside-out before I go comparing and contrasting with others! This labour should carry me into my eighties, at least!

If I won’t annoy everyone with stupid questions; I might just stick to asking you all for clarification here on the forum. :blush:

Thank you again and God bless you all.

Jenny x


#15

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