When did the Church first stipulate the Matter for Eucharist?


#1

The Church teaches (as doctrine) that the only suitable matter for valid Eucharist is *wheat *bread and *grape *wine (with a little water). Although the precise definition of these terms may vary slightly in Canon Law, the essense of the requirement is doctrine and may not change, and no Eucharist is valid without both of these specific forms of matter, and other variants (bread made from other grains or wine made from other fruits) is not suitable or valid matter.

I’m curious to know the earliest recorded instance when these specific requirements (wheat bread and grape wine) were stipulated.


#2

[quote=DavidFilmer]The Church teaches (as doctrine) that the only suitable matter for valid Eucharist is *wheat *bread and *grape *wine (with a little water). Although the precise definition of these terms may vary slightly in Canon Law, the essense of the requirement is doctrine and may not change, and no Eucharist is valid without both of these specific forms of matter, and other variants (bread made from other grains or wine made from other fruits) is not suitable or valid matter.

I’m curious to know the earliest recorded instance when these specific requirements (wheat bread and grape wine) were stipulated.
[/quote]

I do know of a document from the 1100’s where a local Bishop from Iceland or Greenland (?) asked Rome for permission to use a local grain because wheat would not grow there and another that asked to use a local ale instead of wine because it was not available. Both requests were rejected and the traditional matter of the Sacrament upheld. I’m sure that there must be others dating before this time. This is where the term a "Dry Mass"comes from.


#3

Hi David,

I don’t think there was never any controversy about “bread” as made from wheat flour. Jesus used it and said to do likewise. There was more controversy as to the use of leavened or unleavened bread. The Eastern Churches at one time claimed that leavened bread was to be used. But at the Council of Florence, it was agreed, by East and West, that both kinds were valid matter. I should thinks that this generally stands today, except perhaps in some Orthodox splinter groups.

Verbum


#4

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