When do you start Spring Cleaning?


#1

The dust that settled into the ledges, nooks and crannies is getting to me. I want to start spring cleaning today. The small hand-held vacuume awaits me.

My toddler doesn't seem to want to co-operate with my cleaning efforts. I probably confused her when I climbed onto the counter that I tell her not to climb. I know, I have a toddler and it's hard to clean with toddlers...but I've had a toddler for almost all of the past twenty years and eventually the house needs cleaning.

Time to get back to work. Maybe before I get started I should to find a little smily-face of someone stirring up dust....okay, this will have to do: :heaven:


#2

I’ve been trying to hold off on major cleaning until Lent starts. We’re going to go through the house and try to come up with 40 bags of stuff that will go out the door (mostly to be donated and since we have a small house it will be small bags) and I knew it would drive me crazy if I started major cleaning (as opposed to the cleaning I do every night after the kids are in bed) and couldn’t haul the stuff out of the house right away…


#3

[quote="RedSoxWife, post:2, topic:231291"]
I've been trying to hold off on major cleaning until Lent starts. We're going to go through the house and try to come up with 40 bags of stuff that will go out the door (mostly to be donated and since we have a small house it will be small bags) and I knew it would drive me crazy if I started major cleaning (as opposed to the cleaning I do every night after the kids are in bed) and couldn't haul the stuff out of the house right away...

[/quote]

Oh, what a GREAT idea! I think I'm going to try that! We moved rather unexpectedly in December of 2009 and I moved a lot of stuff I really wouldn't have, given time to sort through it.

I have heard about people cleaning out for Ash Wednesday but that day is going to spent in prayer at my Planned Parenthood for 40 Days for Life kickoff (Abby Johnson is coming to Houston!) so I will implement this Lenten mission after that.


#4

My family doesn’t do spring cleaning we just clean the house when there is too much dust or a big mess.


#5

The tradition is before Easter. However it is ussually done the moment it starts geting wormer. The first week-end that feels like srpings. When it's worm and sunny outside, you open the windows, put worm clothes in the wordrobes etc.


#6

I actually have my house divided into sections and I clean one section a day thoroughly for about 1.5-2 hours. Monday is kitchen day, Tuesday is the living room/play room, Wednesday is the front hall/dining room/laundry room/guest bathroom, Thursday is the Master bedroom/bath/shower/closet, Friday is upstairs (nobody ever goes up there, so it's easy). This way, I get to really clean everything well every day. When I do the kitchen on Mondays, I go through and clean out all the cabinets, wipe out the oven, scrub the stove, clean out the fridge and pantry, dust the cabinets/fixtures/top of the fridge and cabinets, wipe the baseboards and mop the floor and dust the blinds. I stick with this level of cleaning for each section of the house and since I do it every day, it only takes about 1.5-2 hours a day and the house stays really clean. I do laundry on Saturday and nothing on Sunday :) About once a year I clean behind the fridge, under the stove and behind the washer/dryer and scrub the floors on my hands and knees and take down the blinds and hose them off outside and wash the windows.

I have a toddler and am preggo with #2, so I'm sure this will all go to hell soon!


#7

[quote="Joseklos, post:4, topic:231291"]
My family doesn't do spring cleaning we just clean the house when there is too much dust or a big mess.

[/quote]

Our family does the same. I never understood the idea of doing large scale cleaning in the spring anyway. I prefer 30 minutes to an hour of cleaning every so often.


#8

"Cleaning" .....what does this word mean?

I am not familiar with it......:confused:

With a large shedding dog, cats, and kids, nothing ever stays clean for long.

Yesterday, I vacuumed the living room carpet. Then I let the dog out to do his business, and as soon as he came in, he went to the carpet I had JUST VACUUMED and proceeded to roll, roll, roll all around it. Once he was done, there was just as much dog hair on there as before I started.

So I keep asking myself....what is the point?:rolleyes:


#9

[quote="gardenswithkids, post:1, topic:231291"]
The dust that settled into the ledges, nooks and crannies is getting to me. I want to start spring cleaning today. The small hand-held vacuume awaits me.

My toddler doesn't seem to want to co-operate with my cleaning efforts. I probably confused her when I climbed onto the counter that I tell her not to climb. I know, I have a toddler and it's hard to clean with toddlers...but I've had a toddler for almost all of the past twenty years and eventually the house needs cleaning.

Time to get back to work. Maybe before I get started I should to find a little smily-face of someone stirring up dust....okay, this will have to do: :heaven:

[/quote]

:)The old saying goes, " A Stitch in time sames Nine", Do yourself a favour!;)Peace, Carlan


#10

[quote="Catholic90, post:8, topic:231291"]
"Cleaning" .....what does this word mean?

I am not familiar with it......:confused:

With a large shedding dog, cats, and kids, nothing ever stays clean for long.

Yesterday, I vacuumed the living room carpet. Then I let the dog out to do his business, and as soon as he came in, he went to the carpet I had JUST VACUUMED and proceeded to roll, roll, roll all around it. Once he was done, there was just as much dog hair on there as before I started.

So I keep asking myself....what is the point?:rolleyes:

[/quote]

Cleaning your house while your kids are still growing is like shoveling the walk before it stops snowing. Phyllis Diller

Of course, if you didn't clean at all, the carpet the dog likes to roll on would eventually gain a coating that could be pulled up as a felt mat. If the public servants in charge of child advocacy see this kind of thing, they take the kids away. After all, if you never shovelled the walk during a 18-year snow storm, you would find yourself housebound in a very short amount of time! So when you wonder what the point is, just think how bad it would be if you stopped trying.

If it is clean enough to be healthy, you're doing OK. It will never be perfect. Oh, well.


#11

When do I start spring cleaning? that's easy: in the spring...about every 5th year.

By the looks of things, this is the year. :rolleyes: ;)

OK, I clean more than that. I just don't get the whole place simulataneously clean and decluttered any more often than that. (Maybe not that often, come to think of it.)

Did I mention that I spend to much time online? :o


#12

[quote="EasterJoy, post:11, topic:231291"]

Did I mention that I spend to much time online? :o

[/quote]

Are you kidding? I come here so I can avoid noticing that I should be cleaning! :blush:


#13

Oh, and the February issue of the *New England Journal of Medicine *suggests that it is likely that there is such a thing as too clean.

Keep in mind that the Bavarian children in the study are probably from genetic lines of people who have been living in a relatively wet and temperate environment and in close contact with farm animals for centuries, if not millennia. Just as the gene that protects against malaria and leads to sickle cell anemia isn’t uniformly distributed across the globe, these results may not be generally true for the entire human population. (Luckily for my power of rationalization, though, I descend from Bavarian and Swiss farmers!!)

Bacteria on Farms May Protect Against Asthma: Study Shows Children Exposed to Microbes on Farms Have Lower Asthma Risk Than Other Kids
By Salynn Boyles, WebMD Health News, reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD
webmd.com/asthma/news/20110223/bacteria-on-farms-may-protect-against-asthma

Feb. 23, 2011 – New research lends support to the idea that exposure to a wide range of microbes explains why farm kids have lower asthma rates than city kids.

School-aged children in the studies who lived on farms were about 30% to 50% less likely to have asthma than non-farm children who lived nearby.

Farm-dwelling children were also exposed to more bacteria and fungi than the other children.

The studies, which appear in the Feb. 24 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine, suggest a role for the so-called hygiene hypothesis in the development of childhood asthma.

According to the hypothesis, exposure to bacteria and fungi from environmental sources like dirt and animal hair early in life protects against asthma and allergies by helping the immune system develop normally.

It is theorized that increasingly clean environments may at least partially explain why asthma rates have doubled in developed nations in just the last three decades.

Comparing Asthma Rates
To test the theory, German researchers compared asthma rates among Bavarian children living on farms with those of children living in the same rural districts who had little direct contact with farms.

In one study, the researchers conducted DNA analysis on dust samples taken from mattresses of the two groups of children. In another, the researchers analyzed settled dust samples taken from elsewhere in the children’s bedrooms.

The analysis confirmed that kids living on farms had lower asthma rates and were exposed to a wider range of bacteria and fungi than children who did not live on farms.

There was also evidence that specific types of microbial exposures found mainly on farms played a role in the protection, study researcher Markus J. Ege, MD, of the University Children’s Hospital Munich tells WebMD.

“The farm environment is somewhat special, so there may be something about the dirt on farms that is protective,” Ege says.

While the German studies offered early clues as to what these exposures are, the next generation of research should provide much more information about the specific bacteria and/or fungi that protect against asthma, says University of Wisconsin pediatric allergy and asthma specialist James E. Gern, MD.

Vaccine Potential
Recent advances in the field, including the development of high-speed DNA sequencing devices and chip-based probes, will allow researchers to sequence much larger amounts of genetic material faster.

“With these technologies, we will be able to find 100 times more bacteria than were found in these studies,” he says.

The hope is that these studies will identify the specific microbes that protect against asthma, and that this will lead to vaccines or other treatments to prevent children from developing it.

“In the past we have thought that asthma results from contact with something bad in the environment, like tobacco smoke or air pollution,” Gern says. “While that may be true, it appears that there are also environmental factors that protect against asthma. That is very exciting.”


#14

[quote="Alexander_Smith, post:7, topic:231291"]
Our family does the same. I never understood the idea of doing large scale cleaning in the spring anyway. I prefer 30 minutes to an hour of cleaning every so often.

[/quote]

It is possible to spring clean in 30 minute increments but many do it over a weekend or two. And the whole family gets involved; it's an event! This is not a big clean-up after neglect (okay, it *can *be); it's clean up after of being cooped up for the winter. Floors are buffed, carpets vacuumed (or, in the olden days, rugs beaten) and heavy blankets put away and lighter ones brought out. And spring clothes are brought out. But where I live you better not put away the warm stuff at least until June or you're just asking for it :winter:.

I usually start when I can open my windows but letting Lent inspire us to let go of material things that clutter our homes and our souls is good idea. Even if you can't open the windows just yet spring cleaning is a way of opening things up.

ETA: The reverse is often done in the fall. Putting away rakes and taking out the shovels. Getting out the winter gear, blakets clothing and cleaning things so they don't mold, stain or whatever while they are in storage.


#15

[quote="EasterJoy, post:13, topic:231291"]

Bacteria on Farms May Protect Against Asthma: Study Shows Children Exposed to Microbes on Farms Have Lower Asthma Risk Than Other Kids
By Salynn Boyles, WebMD Health News, reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD
webmd.com/asthma/news/20110223/bacteria-on-farms-may-protect-against-asthma

[/quote]

I only have anecdotal evidence, but I agree with this.

Since forever, we have had a small farm inside our house .... a variety of dogs, cats, guinea pigs, rabbits, mice, and birds, usually several at one time, have been residents. With that, it is nearly impossible to keep a spic and span house. There is always some manner of hair, dander, dust, and litter. I vacuum and sweep daily, but the reality of little furries is there is pet fur, dust and dirt around constantly.

My kids are rarely sick. They each get a cold about once a year, and it is usually mild. The number of elementary and high school days they have collectively missed due to being sick can be counted on one hand.

A colleague of mine can't stand the idea of animals in the house. She has a cleaning lady come over once a week, and she is always talking how she is sanitizing this or purifying that. She has 2 kids who are sick a lot. One is in my class this year, and he has missed numerous days due to illness.

Again, only anecdotal and does not prove a thing, but it is interesting...


#16

[quote="Catholic90, post:15, topic:231291"]
I only have anecdotal evidence, but I agree with this.

Since forever, we have had a small farm inside our house .... a variety of dogs, cats, guinea pigs, rabbits, mice, and birds, usually several at one time, have been residents. With that, it is nearly impossible to keep a spic and span house. There is always some manner of hair, dander, dust, and litter. I vacuum and sweep daily, but the reality of little furries is there is pet fur, dust and dirt around constantly.

My kids are rarely sick. They each get a cold about once a year, and it is usually mild. The number of elementary and high school days they have collectively missed due to being sick can be counted on one hand.

A colleague of mine can't stand the idea of animals in the house. She has a cleaning lady come over once a week, and she is always talking how she is sanitizing this or purifying that. She has 2 kids who are sick a lot. One is in my class this year, and he has missed numerous days due to illness.

Again, only anecdotal and does not prove a thing, but it is interesting...

[/quote]

I'm with you. Kitchens out to be sanitary, because food poisoning is a nasty thing, but I believe in the power of immunological experience.


#17

[quote="RedSoxWife, post:2, topic:231291"]
I've been trying to hold off on major cleaning until Lent starts. We're going to go through the house and try to come up with 40 bags of stuff that will go out the door (mostly to be donated and since we have a small house it will be small bags) and I knew it would drive me crazy if I started major cleaning (as opposed to the cleaning I do every night after the kids are in bed) and couldn't haul the stuff out of the house right away...

[/quote]

40 bags of donations for the forty days of Lent---what a great idea!

I know what you mean about having those bags you plan donate hanging around driving you crazy!


#18

[quote="TheRealJuliane, post:3, topic:231291"]
Oh, what a GREAT idea! I think I'm going to try that! We moved rather unexpectedly in December of 2009 and I moved a lot of stuff I really wouldn't have, given time to sort through it.

I have heard about people cleaning out for Ash Wednesday but that day is going to spent in prayer at my Planned Parenthood for 40 Days for Life kickoff (Abby Johnson is coming to Houston!) so I will implement this Lenten mission after that.

[/quote]

God bless you and your efforts with the forty days for life!

I don't think I ever heard of deep cleaning of the home associated with Lent and Ash Wednesday. Spring cleaning and Lent seemed like two separate events to me. That makes sense. Lent is a spiritual sort of "spring cleaning" for the soul.


#19

I think this thread is so quaint and cute. Such memories of long ago, when Grandma was still alive.

Didn't "spring cleaning" went out with egg cups, wearing white gloves to church, and grape Nehi soda? You can still do all of these things, but you have to work hard to find them.


#20

I burst out laughing when I got to the last line. Enjoy your really clean home while it lasts!:rotfl:

Congratulations on your pregnancy! It sounds to me like you’re nesting. :slight_smile:


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