When does one become a Catholic?

This may seem like a silly question, but consider the following:
A baby is born to a Catholic family and is baptized. Prior to receiving subsequent sacraments, the mother of the family takes the family out of the Church and into Protestant denominations. The infant that was baptized, as an adult returns to the Catholic Church and receives the sacraments of reconciliation, communion, and confirmation through RCIA. At what time would that person have been considered “Catholic”? As an infant following baptism, or only as an adult after receiving the other sacraments?

I posted this question on ask an apologist, but it seems to have disapeared without being answered. I would like input on this to help me better understand some anullment questions I have.

Thanks.

PS. What are “tags”. I’m new to forums, and can’t find what it means to add tags to a thread.

baptism.

As stated in the Nicene creed, the Church teaches that there is one Baptism for the remission of sins. All those validly baptised using the Trinitarian formula are Catholics, plain and simple. This Sacrament provides sanctifying grace and justifies that baby’s soul by granting him membership in Christ’s Church.

However, if they are raised outside the Church and start to hold to schismatic or heretical beliefs after the age of reason, this material heresy would place them outside the Church.

I’d say at Baptism.

I can tell you what I know about tags: if you gave this thread a tag of “baptism,” then if one were to search for “baptism,” this thread would be one of the results. So, you can add 5 tags that you think are most relevant to the thread. Make sense? Honestly I can’t think of any other purpose for tags other than for searching purposes…but if anyone else knows they can let you know.

At baptism.

At baptism.

Can. 96 By baptism one is incorporated into the Church of Christ and is constituted a person in it with the duties and rights which are proper to Christians in keeping with their condition, insofar as they are in ecclesiastical communion and unless a legitimately issued sanction stands in the way.

The particular type of RCIA for someone in that situation is RCIA for the previously baptised but un-catechised Catholics. This is different from RCIA for the unbaptised and RCIA for those baptised non-Catholic.

This is great to know. Many people should be made aware of this.

movers LA

Thank you all for your prompt and definitive responses.

Tony, you’re going to get all kinds of crazy answers because there are all kinds of crazy opinions out there. Catholics don’t know their faith very well, and the Catholics on CAF are no exception to this rule.

Right here. The baby/child/adult is considered Catholic by virtue of his/her baptism.

One becomes a Catholic when they are Baptised. This includes all persons who have been Baptised, as the effecation of the Sacrament spirates from the Church, making all Christians subject to Her.

This was pretty much the exact situation I was in. I was baptized Catholic as a baby, but my parents decided to start going to a Methodist church when I was a young child, so that’s what I was raised. I always knew I’d been baptized in a Catholic church, but if asked what my religious affiliation was, I would have answered Methodist since that’s the only church I ever went to.

When we decided to come back to the Catholic church (my husband was a fallen away cradle Catholic), I did have to go through RCIA for instruction. There were about four or five of us who had been baptized in the Catholic church as children, but had not completed the rest of the sacraments of initiation. We had our first communion and comfirmation at the Easter Vigil, but they separated us from the other catechumens and candidates and recognized us as baptized Catholics who were receiving sacraments.

Baptism. Because they were away from the faith for a while they would’ve been in an imperfect communion with the Church, but brought back into full communion after the reversion.

What? They would have been out of communion. Heresy and schism remove a person from union with Christ’s Church.

Not if they were raised Protestant through no fault of their own and it wasn’t their fault they were in a schism and believed heresy. I mean if they didn’t realize they were believing heresy.

Not knowing they’re believing heresy is still called material heresy. Why have Catholics been afraid to describe objective reality since the 1960s?

=tony_usa;8990564]This may seem like a silly question, but consider the following:
A baby is born to a Catholic family and is baptized. Prior to receiving subsequent sacraments, the mother of the family takes the family out of the Church and into Protestant denominations. The infant that was baptized, as an adult returns to the Catholic Church and receives the sacraments of reconciliation, communion, and confirmation through RCIA. At what time would that person have been considered “Catholic”? As an infant following baptism, or only as an adult after receiving the other sacraments?

I posted this question on ask an apologist, but it seems to have disapeared without being answered. I would like input on this to help me better understand some anullment questions I have.

Thanks.

FOR INFANTS AT A CATHOLIC BAPTISM

FOR ADULTS UPON RECEPTION OF THE SACRAMENTS OF INIATION: BAPTISM, CONFESSION, EUCHARIST AND CONFIRMATION:thumbsup:

God Bless,
Pat

PS. What are “tags”. I’m new to forums, and can’t find what it means to add tags to a thread.

For the purposes of RCIA they are considered an “Uncatechized Catholic.” For the purposes of marriage, and a subsequent Declaration of Nullity, they are considered Catholic.

They still aren’t formal heretics then and are put into an imperfect communion with the Church. It’s in the Catechism. :slight_smile:

Which isn’t all that comforting since “it is absolutely necessary for salvation that every human creature be subject to the Roman Pontiff.” Or at least according to Pope Boniface VIII.

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