When others blaspheme


#1

Forgive me if I am posting this question in the wrong forum, but I wasn’t sure where exactly this would fit. My question is, what should a Catholic do if a friend or co-worker starts saying horrible, blasphemous things and/or slandering the Church? It might not be directed at that Catholic person specifically, but spoken in a group to no one in particular. This has happened to me a few times. Up until this point, I have just kept silent, but the words of Luke 9:26 lead me to doubt that this is the right thing to do. What is the best way to react in this kind of situation? What is the best thing to say? Should a Catholic get angry and demand that the person show respect and stop blaspheming? Would that really work, or would it just elicit accusations of censorship and imposing one’s religion on another? Should a Catholic just ask nicely for the person to stop?


#2

MontereyMatt,

As you are asking how to respond to attacks against the church, this thread has been moved to the Apologetics forum. You should find the answers you are seeking here.


#3

[quote=MontereyMatt]Forgive me if I am posting this question in the wrong forum, but I wasn’t sure where exactly this would fit. My question is, what should a Catholic do if a friend or co-worker starts saying horrible, blasphemous things and/or slandering the Church? It might not be directed at that Catholic person specifically, but spoken in a group to no one in particular. This has happened to me a few times. Up until this point, I have just kept silent, but the words of Luke 9:26 lead me to doubt that this is the right thing to do. What is the best way to react in this kind of situation? What is the best thing to say? Should a Catholic get angry and demand that the person show respect and stop blaspheming? Would that really work, or would it just elicit accusations of censorship and imposing one’s religion on another? Should a Catholic just ask nicely for the person to stop?
[/quote]

When that verse mentions “being ashamed”, the context is about the sort of thing that happens in time of persecution. “To be ashamed of [Him]”, is to have the attitudes that lead one to renounce Him at such a time. It would apply only if your own reactions to Him were the issue: this seems to be about your reactions to someone else’s reactions, when you haven’t even been directly approached. So what you describe, though not pleasant, is something much more indirect than what that passage in Luke 9 is talking about. A guide to the meaning of that saying is that the Transfiguration follows it: the Father is not ashamed to acknowledge His Son - the implication being, that the disciples must not be ashamed either. The words of the Father recall the Baptism, and look foward to Acts 9 and the words of the Glorified Jesus to Saul the persecutor of those who are not ashamed of Him.

As there is a problem, have you thought of making opportunities, when this goes on, to say anything that shows you don’t agree ?

Anger is very unlikely to achieve anything constructive - it sounds from what you say very much as though a mild approach would be better. Taking a “macho” approach to problems may appeal to most people as strong or effective: but there is often more of our own ego in that, than there is of the graciousness of Christ. To be gracious like Him, requires more strength than being “macho” does - and only He can give it. A gracious, unaggressive approach is anything but weak. After all, it is the POV of Christ on this that matters; not ours: what does *He *want of you in this situation ? How can you best bring the grace of Christ into this situation ? On no account worry - our difficulties are far more God’s business than they ours.

There’s a lot to be said for picking one’s battles - valid criticisms of the Church’s failings based on first hand experience are a very different matter from an alcohol-induced rant; which is different from malicious third-hand gossip; which is different again from ill-informed but well-intentioned & unmalicious rejection of the Church’s theological claims. These things may be equally painful to hear - that does not mean they are moral equivalents. ##


#4

You should atone for the sin to God, for one thing. For example, many people use the name of God in vain. Each time, try to say “Blessed be the Name of God”, either out loud or quietly, depending on the situation.

Secondly, when you get a chance, you should tell them that you don’t appreciate their irreverent talk. So even if they don’t respect God, they might at least respect your sensibilities.

Speak up at the right time, but no need to immediately be angry about it. If anything, fear for their salvation and the loss of blessings to the company.

We are all worthy of reproach in the eyes of God, so don’t speak down to them.

I wouldn’t do something based on whether it would “work”. The basis is to do your duty to God. There could very well be all sorts of accusations, especially if they don’t want to listen. They might ridicule you. Or, they might respectfully cease such talk. You don’t know, and it isn’t up to you to decide for them. Once you make your position known, they have to decide whether to do it to please you or God, or neither.

If they decide to spite you, then it now becomes a harrassment issue, and you can take it up with HR on that basis.

No, but tell them you don’t appreciate it. That implies something. I have experienced these kind of issues, and people have generally been responsive when you leave it up to them. I have also gone above them to discuss it with the supervisor.

hurst


#5

[quote=hurst]You should atone for the sin to God, for one thing. For example, many people use the name of God in vain. Each time, try to say “Blessed be the Name of God”, either out loud or quietly, depending on the situation… . .
[/quote]

Excellent advice! :thumbsup: If some have no fear of boldly blaspheming how much more so should we have no fear of boldly proclaiming the Name of the Lord.


#6

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