When to use what kyriale?

Could anyone explain what the different feast classes that are mentioned in the graduale romanum for when to use what kyriale means? The terms differ from what I am used to, and they also differ between the 1961 Graduale Romanum and the newest edition of Kyriale Romanum.

In the 1961 graduale the terms used are Festis I classis, Festis II classis and festis III classis. What is the difference between these? In the newest edition of the kyriale however, the terms are Festis Solemnibus, Festis Duplicibus and Festis Semiduplicibus. What does duplicibus mean? Do these terms refer directly to solemnities, feasts and memorials?

In the newest kyriale, Missa XIV has is the headline “Infra Octava quæ non sunt de B.M.V.”, whereas in the 1961 graduale it just says “In festis III classis”. Why is this change? Aren’t Christmas and Easter the only octaves observed in the ordinary form anyways? In the 1961 gradual, Missa XV is said to be used “In Commemorationibus et in feriis temporis natalicii”, whereas in the newest kyriale it just says “In Festis Simplicibus”. What does this mean, and why is there a change?

Are these instructions generally held? Or where they initially, but aren’t anymore? For instance, I guess Missa de Angelis is more often used on solemnities nowadays than on festis II classis / festis duplicibus.

Oh, and if anyone knows the translations of all the names of the kyriales (Lux et Origo, Kyrie fons bonitatis, Kyrie Deus sempiterne) I would also be grateful. Are there any special reasons for their respective names?

My ISP has, for some mysterious reason, blocked your second link. However, if I may venture to guess, the “newest edition” Kyriale must be a reprint or something. From the terms you give, it is actually an ‘older’ Kyriale meant for use in the liturgy before 1955.

The terms “Festis I Classis” etc. are the ranks for feasts as they stood after 1960/1. All feasts were ranked “First Class”, “Second Class”, “Third Class”, “Commemoration”. Roughly, I class corresponds to the present day “Solemnities”, II Class to “Feasts” and III Class to “Memeoria” (Note please, that not all feasts retained there ranks, though, in the revised calendar after 1970).

“Festis Duplicibus” etc. refers to the ranks used in the calendar before 1956. They were

Double I Class
Double II Class
Double major
Double (or Double minor)
Semidouble
Simple

“Festis Solemnibus” usually refers to the first two, althoguh it can also refer to other Masses celebrated with solemnity due to local devotion, etc.

In the newest kyriale, Missa XIV has is the headline “Infra Octava quæ non sunt de B.M.V.”, whereas in the 1961 graduale it just says “In festis III classis”.

That was another change. In 1956, all octaves were removed except for Christmas, Easter and Pentecost. (The 1970 then removed Pentecost). Before this, there were other feasts which also had Octaves.

In the 1961 gradual, Missa XV is said to be used “In Commemorationibus et in feriis temporis natalicii”, whereas in the newest kyriale it just says “In Festis Simplicibus”. What does this mean, and why is there a change?

There were 2 calendar changes, one in 1956 and oen in 1960.

In 1956, the rank of “semidouble” was removed. All feasts with this class were demoted to the rank of “simple”. All Sundays were upgraded to the rank of “Double”. “Simple” feasts became “Commemorations”

When the ranks were ‘converted’ in 1960 to a newer form, this was the general rule for feasts.

“Doubles I Class” became “I Class” feasts
"Double II Class" and some “Doubles Major” became “II Class” feasts.
The rest of the “Doubles Major” and the “Doubles” became “III Class” feasts
"Simple" feasts became “Commemorations”

Oh, and if anyone knows the translations of all the names of the kyriales (Lux et Origo, Kyrie fons bonitatis, Kyrie Deus sempiterne) I would also be grateful. Are there any special reasons for their respective names?

The origin for some (not all) of the names was the custom of adding tropes which arose in the Middle Ages. There were different arrangements. Between “Kyrie/Christe” and “eleison” were added other phrases. Or sometimes, the phrase was added before both. See the Catholic Encyclopedia (1913) for more.

For example “Fons bonitatis” was

Kyrie, fons bonitatis, pater ingenite, a quo bona cuncta procedunt, eleison [Lord, fount of goodness, Father unbegotten, from whom all good things proceed, have mercy]

“Lux et origo” was

Lux et origo lucis, summe Deus, eleison. Kyrie eleison

Light and source of light, supreme God, have mercy. Lord have mercy

(Incidentally, tropes are allowed in the Kyrie of the 1970 missal. “Penitential Rite C” follows slightly the style of the last trope.)

My ISP has, for some mysterious reason, blocked your second link. However, if I may venture to guess, the “newest edition” Kyriale must be a reprint or something. From the terms you give, it is actually an ‘older’ Kyriale meant for use in the liturgy before 1955.

The terms “Festis I Classis” etc. are the ranks for feasts as they stood after 1960/1. All feasts were ranked “First Class”, “Second Class”, “Third Class”, “Commemoration”. Roughly, I class corresponds to the present day “Solemnities”, II Class to “Feasts” and III Class to “Memoria” (Note please, that not all feasts retained there ranks, though, in the revised calendar after 1970).

“Festis Duplicibus” etc. refers to the ranks used in the calendar before 1956. They were

Double I Class
Double II Class
Double major
Double (or Double minor)
Semidouble
Simple

“Festis Solemnibus” usually refers to the first two, althoguh it can also refer to other Masses celebrated with solemnity due to local devotion, etc.

In the newest kyriale, Missa XIV has is the headline “Infra Octava quæ non sunt de B.M.V.”, whereas in the 1961 graduale it just says “In festis III classis”.

That was another change. In 1956, all octaves were removed except for Christmas, Easter and Pentecost. (The 1970 then removed Pentecost). Before this, there were other feasts which also had Octaves.

In the 1961 gradual, Missa XV is said to be used “In Commemorationibus et in feriis temporis natalicii”, whereas in the newest kyriale it just says “In Festis Simplicibus”. What does this mean, and why is there a change?

There were 2 calendar changes, one in 1956 and oen in 1960.

In 1956, the rank of “semidouble” was removed. All feasts with this class were demoted to the rank of “simple”. All Sundays were upgraded to the rank of “Double”. “Simple” feasts became “Commemorations”

When the ranks were ‘converted’ in 1960 to a newer form, this was the general rule for feasts.

“Doubles I Class” became “I Class” feasts
"Double II Class" and some “Doubles Major” became “II Class” feasts.
The rest of the “Doubles Major” and the “Doubles” became “III Class” feasts
"Simple" feasts became “Commemorations”

Oh, and if anyone knows the translations of all the names of the kyriales (Lux et Origo, Kyrie fons bonitatis, Kyrie Deus sempiterne) I would also be grateful. Are there any special reasons for their respective names?

The origin for some (not all) of the names was the custom of adding tropes which arose in the Middle Ages. There were different arrangements. Between “Kyrie/Christe” and “eleison” were added other phrases. Or sometimes, the phrase was added before both. See the Catholic Encyclopedia (1913) for more.

For example “Fons bonitatis” was

Kyrie, fons bonitatis, pater ingenite, a quo bona cuncta procedunt, eleison [Lord, fount of goodness, Father unbegotten, from whom all good things proceed, have mercy]

“Lux et origo” was

Lux et origo lucis, summe Deus, eleison. Kyrie eleison

Light and source of light, supreme God, have mercy. Lord have mercy

These tropes were removed and disallowed after the 1570 missal.

(Incidentally, tropes are allowed in the Kyrie of the 1970 missal. “Penitential Rite C” follows slightly the style of the last trope.)

Thank you! Very informative.
Can you tell us exactly which Kyrie to use for the 1962 Yearly Cycle, especially for the sunday Masses?

I know the ranking was changed in the 50s so that the Sunday Mass was much less often superceded by a Feast Day.
How far, e.g. does Lux et Origo last? Till Pentecost Sunday ‘inclusive’? Is Pentecost Sunday itself Kyrie VIII De Angelis? I suppose Christ the King (Last Sunday in October) is Missa VIII?

My Liber Usualis is a 1920s edition.

Kyriale 1 for Easter and after (Lux et origo)

The 2,3 and **4 **for different feasts

The 8th (De Angelis) are for very big feasts like All Saint’s Day

**9th **for Virgin Mary Feasts (or on Saturday in some monasteries, and the 10th as well)

11th in Ordinary Sundays (orbis factor)

17th: for Lent and Advent (18th during the week, Lent and Advent)
I put in red the ones that we mainly sing in my local parish during the TLM.

You can find them there:
christusrex.org/www2/cantgreg/kyriale_eng.html

Thank you! Merci bien! (And no mistakes in English!)

Merci à vous ! :blush::blush::slight_smile:

Why don’t you use the Kyriale as found in the 1924 Liber Usualis in modern notation, available (in 4 pdf files) from the Jean de Lalande site, mentioned above by Robert (or in 18 files from a different reprint in this site)? It follows the 1908 Graduale, with Solesmes rythmic signs.

You may also find the chants you want (though not the complete Kyriale) in this book from the MusicaSacra site.

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