Where are all the records of the sheep being fed?

I am asking this in all sincerity as I want to gain understanding.

In John 21 we read Jesus telling Peter 3 times, Feed my sheep.
Shortly after that we hear very little about Peter, he is mentioned a few times, but there is hardly anything except for 2 epistles. So my question is WHY isn’t Peter central to all the scriptures from Acts to Revelation? Why do we not hear about his ministry and everything he did to feed the sheep of the Lord?

I give up. Where are they?

Are you implying that if we are not aware of where they are, there is a conclusion to which we should come?

they are on the clipboard down at the barn

sj

Basically, the Church is one billion strong and still growing…is that not a sign that the sheep are being fed?

[quote=jpusateri]I give up. Where are they?

Are you implying that if we are not aware of where they are, there is a conclusion to which we should come?
[/quote]

No, I am asking a simple question. We read all about Paul in the books between Acts and Revelations, and other than 2 very short epistles, there is hardly anything about Peter. Are there church documents elsewhere that tells what Peter did, any that talk about his ministry. There’s no hidden agenda, I just want to know where to find it? It seems odd that with Peter being the one told to feed the sheep that we don’t read more about him in scripture.

smileys.smileycentral.com/cat/13/13_1_213.gif

[quote=st julie]they are on the clipboard down at the barn

sj
[/quote]

[quote=gelsbern]No, I am asking a simple question. We read all about Paul in the books between Acts and Revelations, and other than 2 very short epistles, there is hardly anything about Peter. Are there church documents elsewhere that tells what Peter did, any that talk about his ministry. There’s no hidden agenda, I just want to know where to find it? It seems odd that with Peter being the one told to feed the sheep that we don’t read more about him in scripture.

[/quote]

It’s a decent and worthy question. We all know that Jesus put Peter in charge, because of the Key exchange. Paul wasn’t an option, he wasn’t even a Christian. I always wondered why Jesus didn’t leave James, his beloved disciple the sheep. And both of these men wrote more than Peter…

But Jesus gave it to Peter…maybe he had the right Character for the job…I don’t know…it’s speculation. I don’t think you will find the answer that your looking for. These men started a Church…they didn’t set out to write the Bible

Hi Gelsbern!

I think you are wrong about St. Peter in Acts. The first 16 chapters are all about him and the things that he did, which is over half of the 28 chapters of the book of Acts.

You might also consider that Luke apparently was a companion of both Peter and Paul and chronicled his time with them. Paul was an evangelist and a man of letters, whereas Peter was a simple fisherman without much learning. When it comes to writing, who do you think would be most into that?

(IMO)The fact that the early church survived and the succession of apostles & bishops was maintained is a powerful testament to the working of the Holy Spirit through Peter and subsequent defacto popes.
Pax tecum,

[quote=Lillith] James, his beloved disciple …
[/quote]

Don’t you mean John? James was not called the beloved disciple. :slight_smile:

the sheep are in the meadow and the cows in the corn.

[quote=Lillith]It’s a decent and worthy question. We all know that Jesus put Peter in charge, because of the Key exchange. Paul wasn’t an option, he wasn’t even a Christian. I always wondered why Jesus didn’t leave James, his beloved disciple the sheep. And both of these men wrote more than Peter…

But Jesus gave it to Peter…maybe he had the right Character for the job…I don’t know…it’s speculation. I don’t think you will find the answer that your looking for. These men started a Church…they didn’t set out to write the Bible
[/quote]

Why did Jesus leave the Keys to the Kingdom to Peter??? That’s easy. Just look to that wise sage of today and apply the Dilbert Principle.

Yes, Jesus left the Keys to the Kingdom to Peter because he was tall and he had good hair. Isn’t that how all bosses are chosen??? Duh.

Again, I prove that my humor is,
NotWorthy

Isn’t that the point, Peter was to busy tending the sheep to write much about it. :thumbsup:

The records are currently being maintained by the Sacred Tradition department of the RCC. If you wish to find what Peter and the other Peters have said in written form, look in the Catechism.

[quote=Church Militant]Don’t you mean John? James was not called the beloved disciple. :slight_smile:

[/quote]

opps…look at the time I typed that…of course John

[quote=gelsbern]I am asking this in all sincerity as I want to gain understanding.

In John 21 we read Jesus telling Peter 3 times, Feed my sheep.
Shortly after that we hear very little about Peter, he is mentioned a few times, but there is hardly anything except for 2 epistles. So my question is WHY isn’t Peter central to all the scriptures from Acts to Revelation? Why do we not hear about his ministry and everything he did to feed the sheep of the Lord?
[/quote]

Because the Church is not the “Peter Show” even though he occupies the key position of leadership and authority. If every NT book had as it’s focus Peter, there wouldn’t be room for anything else, would would make the whole NT rather limited in usefulness. Having said that, there is plenty in Acts, Galatians and Peter’s two epistles to show us his centrality:

Whenever the apostles were named, Peter headed the list (Matt. 10:1-4, Mark 3:16-19, Luke 6:14-16, Acts 1:13); sometimes the apostles were referred to as “Peter and those who were with him” (Luke 9:32). Peter was the one who generally spoke for the apostles (Matt. 18:21, Mark 8:29, Luke 12:41, John 6:68-69), and he figured in many of the most dramatic scenes (Matt. 14:28-32, Matt. 17:24-27, Mark 10:23-28). On Pentecost it was Peter who first preached to the crowds (Acts 2:14-40), and he worked the first healing in the Church age (Acts 3:6-7). It is Peter’s faith that will strengthen his brethren (Luke 22:32) and Peter is given Christ’s flock to shepherd (John 21:17). An angel was sent to announce the resurrection to Peter (Mark 16:7), and the risen Christ first appeared to Peter (Luke 24:34). He headed the meeting that elected Matthias to replace Judas (Acts 1:13-26), and he received the first converts (Acts 2:41). He inflicted the first punishment (Acts 5:1-11), and excommunicated the first heretic (Acts 8:18-23). He led the first council in Jerusalem (Acts 15), and announced the first dogmatic decision (Acts 15:7-11). It was to Peter that the revelation came that Gentiles were to be baptized and accepted as Christians (Acts 10:46-48). In Galatians 1, Paul also relates that he went to Jerusalem to meet with Peter and be instructed by him.

This is only a small sampling, but enough to show that, not only is it not true that Peter is “hardly mentioned at all,” but, rather, he played a central and vital role in the early Church.

Considering that Peter was busy starting a Church at Antioch and then went to Rome and started the Church at Rome (we are told this by the Fathers)…

AND considering that Christ never told Peter to go write a book, and considering that most of Acts is about Peter, and considering that Peter preached to the gentiles on his journeys, I would say your assessment that we never hear from or about Peter would not be correct :slight_smile:

If you want more information on what Peter did do that might not be in the scriptures, you could read some of the Early Fathers.

Gracie

[quote=gelsbern]I am asking this in all sincerity as I want to gain understanding.

WHY isn’t Peter central to all the scriptures from Acts to Revelation? Why do we not hear about his ministry and everything he did to feed the sheep of the Lord?
[/quote]

Are you trying to imply that he didn’t tend the sheep? What would you imagine that would entail?

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.