Where are the seminaries that aren't filled with problems?


#21

Continued

Here, frankly, we arrive at the crux of the matter. If you are seeking an arrangement with a diocesan bishop who is not even the bishop of your own diocese, while asking him to send out of country to seminary…well, this is more than an extraordinary request. It diminishes his opportunity to come to know you or you to know him…and the same is true for knowing the diocese and the presbyterate and they to know you

You would have to reach out to that diocese to initiate their discerning you for their needs and their presbyterate. I would presume they would want you to come and live in their diocese, doing some sort of tasks they would assign, in order to get to know you and assess you across time – and to give you the opportunity to experience the diocese and its presbyterate to see if it is a good fit mutually – before deciding what seminary they would confide you to

If on the other hand you wish to pursue a Religious vocation, then it is a matter of going wherever their house of formation is located – in-country or abroad – and follow their path of formation through postulancy, novitiate, temporary promises, and definitive incorporation and then, if you persevere to definitive incorporation, accept whatever assignment is given to you after ordination. By that time, you would be definitively incorporated in that institute of consecrated life and that is where you will be incardinated and you will live your life as a member of that institute.

Wherever you are sent, it would be with the understanding that you are there to be formed by the formators…with openness and docility. A statement about “not being dragged down by child like men” would not have been well received from a new seminarian at my seminary.

I assure you of my prayers.


#22

I don’t think you will find a place that doesn’t have any problems. You may find that going off to some other place that you are trading one set of problems for another. Remember, there is the devil you know and then there is the devil waiting around the corner to grab you.


#23

I apreciate all above this aswell. I also did not mean this in a melicious way. I think retrospectively, this post is probably far more about a discernment of charism than anything else. There are most definetly problems with men in seminaries. However, there is also conflict between ways we best ought to serve the Church, which to my knowledge is why we are served with Religious orders and personal prelatures.

Perhaps the issue at hand is more specifically dealing with different charisms and spirtualities. For example, I personally have great admiration and respect for the spirituality of Opus Dei. Opus Dei, however doesn’t have a direct ‘application process’ for the seminary. They choose priests strictly on a demand basis from a pool of consecrated men. This could apply to other things however. I might have great admiration for the intellectual formation of Dominicans, but do not much like the mendicant lifestyle.

This pokes even deeper, when we must consider what it is that God would want us to do, and not allow our own wants and needs, while being mindful of the gifts God has given us. Pehaps this post is more acurately about discernment of how to know the difference between what we want to do to serve God, and what we ought to do to serve God.


#24

Are you working with or in contact with a spiritual director or vocations director or novice master or someone else along these lines?

If you aren’t, it sounds like you are at the point where you need to select someone to discern with. They will help you as best they can or pass you along to someone else if it turns out they cannot help you.


#25

And the East Coast/Province are great as well


#26

Yes Father I do understand that but I think (I could easily be wrong) but I believe they send Priests out to other places when needed.


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