Where can I hear the" Our Father" in latin so I can learn it?

I’d like to learn the ‘Our Father’ in latin. I have the text, but have no idea how to pronounce some of the words. Unfortunately, I can’t understand it well enough on the EWTN daily Mass. Anyone know where I can listen to it on the internet, or perhaps a cd? Thanks!

[quote=Elzee]I’d like to learn the ‘Our Father’ in latin. I have the text, but have no idea how to pronounce some of the words. Unfortunately, I can’t understand it well enough on the EWTN daily Mass. Anyone know where I can listen to it on the internet, or perhaps a cd? Thanks!
[/quote]

Here is a link where youcan listen to it:

shrinesf.org/mass.htm#OurFather

Oratio Dominica The Lord’s Prayer
Pater noster, qui es in caelis, sanctificetur nomen tuum. Adveniat regnum tuum. Fiat voluntas tua, sicut in caelo et in terra. Panem nostrum quotidianum da nobis hodie, et dimitte nobis debita nostra sicut et nos dimittimus debitoribus nostris. Et ne nos inducas in tentationem, sed libera nos a malo. Amen.

Ewtn:)

I am so glad to see that folks who grew up after VII are making the effort to learn Latin.:tiphat: to you Elzee! With the exception of some grace notes for the additional sylables in Latin, if you parish has sung the Lord’s Prayer in its traditional setting, you can learn to sing it in plainsong Latin. It’s not identical but it is very close. During Lent, my parish chants the Kyrie, Sanctus, and Angnus Dei. I started learning how to pronounce Latin in kindergarten and first grade back in the 50s since I went to Catholic school.

christusrex.org/www2/cantgreg/cantus/pater_noster_A.mp3I thought that it was sung rather than said and I noticed some differences in the pronunciation. The link above is, I think correct, and you will recognize that the melodic line is the same.

I wouldn’t listen to the EWTN Masses for guidance on Latin pronunciation. Listen to a recording of a good choir or soloist (whose native language is not German- they pronounce Latin differently)- they do it right. Latin is pronounced very similarly to Italian- so an italian choir or soloist singing something in Latin would be good to follow.

I wouldn’t make a big deal about pronunciation, but if you are going to pray in another language, you should recognize and try to project the beauty of it. Most importantly, however, you should be able to think in that language- at least the prayers, otherwise they are little more than sounds (this is true for singing and reading literature as well- not just praying). Don’t go through each word, translating it as you go- pass the translation barrier- simply think the words in that language, and understand what they mean.

Here’s a pronunciation guide to help you pronounce anything in Latin. The words to the Our Father will not be hard to learn using this.

Vowels
a- ah
e- eh
i- ee
o- oh (more like the o in orange, if it is followed by consonant though)
u- oo (a minnesota oo- NOT one with a southern drawl to it)
uu- oo followed by oo (as in good)
ae- a long A sound (one sound throughout- not eh+ee)
oe- eh

Consonants
B, D, F, K, L, M, N, P, Qu, S, T, V- as in English
C ch if followed by E or I, K if followed by A, O, U, or a consonant
CC- breaks the previous rule- pronounced CH
CCH- pronounced K
TI followed by a Vowel- pronounced TSEE (Orationem)
G- hard if followed by A, O, U or a consonant, soft otherwise
H- silent if at the beginning and end of a word
J- pronounced Y (sometimes J’s are replaced with I= Iesus)
R is rolled like it is in Italian, or flipped like it is in British English.
X is pronounced Z if at the beginning of a word- X otherwise
No W, Y, or Z used in Latin.

[quote=Marilena]Here is a link where youcan listen to it:

shrinesf.org/mass.htm#OurFather

Oratio Dominica The Lord’s Prayer
Pater noster, qui es in caelis, sanctificetur nomen tuum. Adveniat regnum tuum. Fiat voluntas tua, sicut in caelo et in terra. Panem nostrum quotidianum da nobis hodie, et dimitte nobis debita nostra sicut et nos dimittimus debitoribus nostris. Et ne nos inducas in tentationem, sed libera nos a malo. Amen.
[/quote]

Thank you for the link. I’ve been listening to a CD of John Paul II lead the Rosary in Latin, and have been able to figure out the Hail Mary, but the part of the Our Father said by the congregation was a bit mumbled on my CD. This link will help me a lot. I like to pray the Rosary in my car and just love to hear John Paul II’s voice, and want to join in the Latin prayer. I’ve been having difficulty memorizing the Pater Noster, and this wav file will help me.

Thanks a lot.

This guy has a great Italian accent, sounds like it is pronounced and accented well to me…

This guy has a great Italian accent, sounds like it is pronounced and accented well to me…

[quote=arieh0310]This guy has a great Italian accent, sounds like it is pronounced and accented well to me…
[/quote]

Actually, I think his accent is French. He also doesn’t enunciate the words as much as I’d prefer.

[quote=brotherhrolf]christusrex.org/www2/cantgreg/cantus/pater_noster_A.mp3I thought that it was sung rather than said and I noticed some differences in the pronunciation. The link above is, I think correct, and you will recognize that the melodic line is the same.
[/quote]

The pronunciation here is ok…the vowels aren’t quite right though. (I know I’m picky…)

If you ever get the chance listen to Compline sung well…it is stunning in its simplicity and beauty…I weep buckets

[quote=brotherhrolf][font=Arial]I thought that it was sung rather than said and I noticed some differences in the pronunciation.
[/quote]

Latin pronounced and sung are slightly different and there are many schools of pronouncing sung latin. The reason for the differences is for sonority and vocal quality.

E.G. On a word with the long A sound as in KyriE (well OK greek) or AEternum, Rather than singing a very bright long A sound, the pronunciation EH, short e, is substituted for vocal sonority.

Depending on the training of the choirmaster, you will get both pronunciations when sung. But that is why there is a difference in sung pronunciation.

And sometimes choirs forget and slip into the spoken pronunciation rather than the more pleasing sung pronunciations.

Joe B

[quote=Elzee]I’d like to learn the ‘Our Father’ in latin. I have the text, but have no idea how to pronounce some of the words. Unfortunately, I can’t understand it well enough on the EWTN daily Mass. Anyone know where I can listen to it on the internet, or perhaps a cd? Thanks!
[/quote]

I’m doing this from memory (so don’t go by my spelling), but I think it goes …

Pater noster, qui es in caelis, sanctificetur nomen tuum. Adveniat regnum tuum, fiat voluntas tua, sicut in caelo et in terra. Panem nostrum quotidianum da nobis hodie. Et dimite nostris debita nostra sicut et nos dimitimus debitoribus nostris. Et ne nos inducas in tentationem. Sed libera nos a malos.

The doxology that the Protestants put at the end is

Quia tuum es regnum, et potestas, et gloria in saecula. Amen.

[quote=m134e5]Actually, I think his accent is French. He also doesn’t enunciate the words as much as I’d prefer.
[/quote]

No, that’s very Italian; very southern Italian, probably Calabrian.

Ya gotta be careful if accurate pronunciations are important to you.

Somewhere along the line, I got a CD of Gregorian Chant. Pretty neat. Then I realized, from the pronunications, that it was sung (chanted) by an order of brothers in Canada. :wink:

I guess regional accents would creep in, regardless of where it was recorded.

I think Al is right. I didn’t even think that my Latin pronunciation might be affected by being an American.

[quote=m134e5]I wouldn’t listen to the EWTN Masses for guidance on Latin pronunciation. Listen to a recording of a good choir or soloist (whose native language is not German- they pronounce Latin differently)- they do it right. Latin is pronounced very similarly to Italian- so an italian choir or soloist singing something in Latin would be good to follow.

I wouldn’t make a big deal about pronunciation, but if you are going to pray in another language, you should recognize and try to project the beauty of it. Most importantly, however, you should be able to think in that language- at least the prayers, otherwise they are little more than sounds (this is true for singing and reading literature as well- not just praying). Don’t go through each word, translating it as you go- pass the translation barrier- simply think the words in that language, and understand what they mean.

Here’s a pronunciation guide to help you pronounce anything in Latin. The words to the Our Father will not be hard to learn using this.

Vowels
a- ah
e- eh
i- ee
o- oh (more like the o in orange, if it is followed by consonant though)
u- oo (a minnesota oo- NOT one with a southern drawl to it)
uu- oo followed by oo (as in good)
ae- a long A sound (one sound throughout- not eh+ee)
oe- eh

Consonants
B, D, F, K, L, M, N, P, Qu, S, T, V- as in English
C ch if followed by E or I, K if followed by A, O, U, or a consonant
CC- breaks the previous rule- pronounced CH
CCH- pronounced K
TI followed by a Vowel- pronounced TSEE (Orationem)
G- hard if followed by A, O, U or a consonant, soft otherwise
H- silent if at the beginning and end of a word
J- pronounced Y (sometimes J’s are replaced with I= Iesus)
R is rolled like it is in Italian, or flipped like it is in British English.
X is pronounced Z if at the beginning of a word- X otherwise
No W, Y, or Z used in Latin.
[/quote]

Thank you so much - and thanks to everyone else, too.!

You may want to find a CD with prayers of John Paull II called Pater Noster. There you find some of his reflections put with music and Our Father sung by JPII in Latin

If you use the pronunciation rules of Castillan Spanish that will get you close to the Latin as well - maybe berrer than the Italian.

Both Castillan Spanish and Italian are just modern forms of Latin anyway, because, it’s plain to see, that Latin is not dead.

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