Where do Protestants go to service while on vacation?

I really am curious, I am not trying to be demeaning, but where do Protestants go to Sunday service while on vacation?

The thought occurred to me this morning. My family and I were out of town this weekend and we had no problem finding a Mass to attend. Even though we had never been to the Catholic Church we visited this morning we felt at home. There was never a doubt that the Mass at this Church was the same as was being celebrated at our Church back in our own neighborhood.

There are many shades of truth in the different Protestant Churches. How does a faithful Protestant know with certainty that the services offered outside his own church will meet his or her spiritual needs?

[quote=Bud Stewart]I really am curious, I am not trying to be demeaning, but where do Protestants go to Sunday service while on vacation?

The thought occurred to me this morning. My family and I were out of town this weekend and we had no problem finding a Mass to attend.

There are many shades of truth in the different Protestant Churches. How does a faithful Protestant know with certainty that the services offered outside his own church will meet his or her spiritual needs?
[/quote]

Interesting question…

Those in my family don’t ask and I don’t think it matters to them. Perhaps keeping the Lord’s day does not equate with keeping it the way the Lord suggested?

When we were visiting my eldest son on a weekend, we asked for a local Catholic Church. He is not a practicing Catholic, and his wife is Ukranian Catholc. They took us to a rather new Church - lots of glass and steel, platform type of “altar” in the round, no statues, no pictures, no candles, no Cross. The tabernacle was in a converted utility room with enough for 2 people to sit/kneel. Of course there were no kneelers. Homily was weak and reverence was only found in the dictionary. I happened to be in the line to receive from the priest, and when I genuflected I got the look!!

Maybe that is why our separated brethren don’t ask. Deep down they know they aren’t missing much. They need to come home.

MrShttp://forums.catholic.com/images/icons/icon7.gif

According to my ex-protestant evangelical wife (in this order):

  1. Many of them simply don’t go to church while on vacation. :nope:

  2. But if they are visiting friends, they will usually attend their church :wave: or

  3. They’ll look for a church in the vacationing area of an “acceptable” denomination. :ehh:

Cheers,
Martin
PS. Smiley icons brought to you by . . . my wife.

My Protestant friends will not even attend thier own denomination church when on vacation. They say that even with in the denomination that thing are so different that they would not even recognize the service, so they will not attend. They say that they would not trust the out come of such an atempt.

bah…I can’t stand going at home much less vacation. :frowning:

We aren’t bound to go to church every Sunday like Roman Catholics. I believe that this is where the difference arises.

On vacation, I usually don’t go to church, but then again, I don’t usually go on vacation.

If I’m visiting family (non-cult family, that is) I will usually go with them to church.

Hope that answers it.

~mango~

When I was a Protestant if we were visiting family we would go where they went…

Usually we learned by word of mouth where we could find an ‘acceptable’ place to attend. Acceptable meaning ‘one of our kind’ of churches… :stuck_out_tongue: If we were travelling to say, Pensacola, we would ask around at church and someone would know someone who attended the First Baptist Church (or whatever) and recommend it…or we would look in publications of our denomination. A religious newsletter or magazine sent in the mail would sometimes list churches that were of ‘our kind of Christians’.

There is a network among Fundamentalist Independant Baptists…and Southern Baptists. If nothing else…once you reached your destination you could always look in the phone book.

The services would differ a little from place to place but it wasn’t that drastic a difference.

I can only speak for Independant/conservative/southern Baptists. I have no idea what people in other denominations do.

Or sometimes…we just wouldn’t go.

dream wanderer

[quote=dream wanderer]When I was a Protestant if we were visiting family we would go where they went…

Usually we learned by word of mouth where we could find an ‘acceptable’ place to attend. Acceptable meaning ‘one of our kind’ of churches… :stuck_out_tongue: If we were travelling to say, Pensacola, we would ask around at church and someone would know someone who attended the First Baptist Church (or whatever) and recommend it…or we would look in publications of our denomination. A religious newsletter or magazine sent in the mail would sometimes list churches that were of ‘our kind of Christians’.

There is a network among Fundamentalist Independant Baptists…and Southern Baptists. If nothing else…once you reached your destination you could always look in the phone book.

The services would differ a little from place to place but it wasn’t that drastic a difference.

I can only speak for Independant/conservative/southern Baptists. I have no idea what people in other denominations do.

Or sometimes…we just wouldn’t go.

dream wanderer
[/quote]

That seems to coincide with what I sense from Protestant (don’t classify me as a Protestant) members in my family. The approach to finding a church in the first place is that of looking for one that fits the personal thought of how to come to Christ. In other words, “let’s see where God is doing it my way” (Thanks Frank)

Similarly, in their “baptism” - it is not recognized as the sacrament and what God has done in us. So when they are re-born and baptised (by submersion usually) it is finally done “right”. There is no awareness that they are really saying, "God, since you didn’t do it right in that other Church (especially that Catholic one), I’m having my pastor do it right!

One son of mine is now upset because the pastor “he chose” decided to quit and move on. Now what?

As a Catholic, I don’t have the worry. The Truth won’t quit no matter what the mood of the pastor is, or what my desire is either. Guess that’s why Catholics (but not al) want the Mass on Sundays, vacation or not.

MrS

I repeat myself: what’s a vacation? :stuck_out_tongue:

I can’t remember the last time I was in a strange place over a weekend on vacation. We’re always with relatives, and when we were still Protestants, we would just go to church with them. I suppose if I had been in a totally strange place, I would have looked up the nearest Southern Baptist church and gone there. In any case, that’s not a problem any more :smiley:

DaveBj

As a Protestant, I hardly went to church on vacations.
You need to realize that skipping church on a Sunday isn’t emphasized as a “mortal sin”.

I’m going to tell a story of something I recall so you see something about most Protestants or Baptists – what was going on made little sense to me at that time years ago.

I remember one Sunday Afternoon (in College) that I was going to go somewhere with my buddies. But the guy with the car had a relative visiting (another young man our age who was Roman Catholic). The Catholic had to go talk with a Priest right away because he wasn’t able to make it to Mass (he was visiting from out-of-town and it was summer – a vacation).

Whoo boy, I thought that guy was religious or what. I didn’t see the big deal. Just pray and ask Jesus to forgive you (and I wasn’t going to pray even though I missed Church myself that day as well).

My friend said I wouldn’t understand and it was too long to explain. So we all piled into the car and drove off to the Catholic Church. We found the Priest and with all of us standing there the Priest told him that it was OK because the Lord understood he was traveling. Travelers had some mercy. (I also thought in my mind, “See, we were right weren’t we. No big deal.”)

(Don’t take this story as instruction about Catholicism. I didn’t remember so much. But use it as illustration that things are different for many Protestants – sure we go to Church. But I didn’t consider it a Mortal Sin if I missed sometimes.

After attending Mass a few times (I haven’t yet started RCIA), I think I understand. It gives me more godly direction in my life – the same as when I read from Bishop Sheen. It is a little bit more than going to my Baptist Church when they have a really good service. When I start a day without Bishop Sheen (or without attending the weekday morning Mass) it isn’t the same kind of day.

The answer to the question varies a lot. As someone else said, fundamentalists would generally make an effort of seek out a church of their own persuasion. Less strict Protestants might not go at all. Devout mainline or other non-fundamentalist Protestants might choose to go to a church of their own denomination, or they might see travel as an opportunity to visit a different kind of church. I would be most likely to go to an Episcopal church (my own denomination), but depending on the local circumstances I might visit a Catholic or Orthodox church or a church of some other Protestant variety. Now that I’m married (to a Methodist, although a very high-church one) I might go to a Methodist church–particularly when visiting my Methodist relatives, for instance. When in Germany last year I went mostly to Lutheran, but sometimes to Catholic churches (when in Bavaria several years ago I went to the local Catholic parish). I feel deprived if I haven’t been present at a celebration of the Eucharist on a Sunday, even if I can’t commune, so given the choice I’d generally rather go to a Catholic church than to a Protestant church where communion is not being celebrated. This is, of course, a very un-Protestant attitude–I don’t claim to be anything but typical, and indeed Episcopalians generally are not representative of Protestants.

Since most Protestants hold either an invisible-church ecclesiology or a rather broad view of the borders of the visible church, a Protestant doesn’t feel obligated to go to a church of his/her own denomination (except in the case of those few Protestant groups that in some sense see themselves as the true Church). But in practice most Protestants tend to stick fairly close to what they’re used to.

The following inaccurate statements need to be refuted.

:Similarly, in their “baptism” - it is not recognized as the sacrament and what God has done in us.:

This is not true of Protestants as a whole, most of whom do see baptism as a sacrament, and some of whom do see it as the means by which God works in us.

: So when they are re-born and baptised (by submersion usually) it is finally done “right”.:

this applies only to some Baptists and other similar groups. Please do not make statements about all Protestants unless you know what you are talking about. Remember how you feel when Protestants unthinkingly repeat lies about Catholicism. It’s no better when you do it.

In Christ,

Edwin

I would probably go to the same church Jesus went to. Where was that now? :smiley:

If the baptism is recognized as what Christ has done for us, why would anyone want to be re-baptized? Yes it occurs in the Baptist communities. In the Catholic Church we have a “provisional” baptism. If one is baptised (perhaps again) using the correct procedure, is is because there was some doubt as to whether the first really occured (at all, or correctly). My point was that other communities, Baptist and other Protestants, do not recognize the importance of Baptism when they “do it again” or even choose not to receive (themselves or their children). So I will only stand corrected about “all Protestants” - a phrase I did not use.

As for vacation and Sunday services…the topic of this thread… the point is still the same… if you don’t really think it is important or necessary, or required…(Catholics too) … you will make up your own rules as to when, if, why etc… just like Baptism.

MrS

by the way… the Catholic use of Holy Water is a constant reminder of "…one Lord, one Faith, one Baptism…"
One Lord, Jesus Christ who founded one Church…
One Faith. including adherance to John 6, fully - The Mass
One Baptism - must be important to be included like it is.http://forums.catholic.com/images/icons/icon14.gif

When I was a Protestant I didn’t attend church in the summer months…
So,when my family and I went on vacation to Cape Cod, it didn’t even occur to us…it wasn’t a sin and as long as you didn’t work on the Sabbath and you read some Bible passages you gave your time to the Lord.
Besides, we wouldn’t have considered going to another Protestant church unless it was Baptist.
[font=Verdana]
[/font]:rolleyes:We didn’t like the Pentacostals, the Congregationalist, the Methodists and surely not the Unitarians…and those Catholics!:eek:
Who woulda thunk?:wink:

I’m so happy I decided to become a Catholic back in '63!

can I still say that I have that Joy, Joy, Joy down in my heart anyway?
What a wonderful thing it is to be Home…:love:

I hate that mentality. I don’t get it, although I would add that I wouldn’t go to a Unitarian church…it’s not Protestant.

~mango~

My wife and I took a short vacation this past weekend. It is a matter of conviction with us that we attend church on Sunday. We looked in the small town’s weekly newspaper and chose a church where we believed that the pastor would be orthodox rather than heretical (as so many mainline denominations have become).

With us, the goal is not really to find a church of our own denomination. We look for one where the music will not sound like it was imported from the local rock & roll joint and the preaching will not be of the health & wealth/claim your miracle variety.

We join in the singing and prayers and we listen attentively to the preaching. Regardless of the denomination of the church, we rarely hear anything that we would consider biblically incorrect. Evangelicals (except for the prosperity preachers) agree on perhaps 98% of biblical interpretation.

[quote=MrS]If the baptism is recognized as what Christ has done for us, why would anyone want to be re-baptized?
[/quote]

Off the topic of this thread but I will point out two things: first . . .‘baptism’ is simply the Greek word for ‘Immerse’. (To ‘dip’, literally). When the King James translators were doing their thing, a very serious debate erupted over the wisdom of transliterating ‘baptizo’ or translating it. Those who favored transliterating the word ‘won’ and most English translations since have followed suit. It can be assumed, given the tremendous influence of the KJV that had this debate gone the other way, tremendous pressure would have exerted on all English-speaking Protestants–and perhaps even on the Roman Catholic Church itself–to make baptism via immersion the ‘standard’ . After all, even the Didache and similar early documents refer to immersion as the ‘normative’ method of baptism–pouring or sprinkling were methods employed only due to shortage of water or in case of emergency when no source of water sufficient to accomodate immersion was available. The Orthodox churches immerse even infants–three times, I understand. How they do it without drowning the little buggers, I don’t know, but if they do it, it can obviously be done.

Secondly: Protestants in most ‘anabaptist’ traditions practice ‘believer’s baptism’–baptism as a public display of the faith of the individual, after that individual has personally accepted Christ as Saviour. There is no understanding that one’s parents or godparents can make this commitment to Christ on one’s own behalf. (Many Protestants do ‘dedicate’ infants in a church service soon following birth, but without baptising them: this is not much different from infant baptism, since the parents and the congregation make a covenant together to raise the child in a Christian home. But of course, no one understands this to be a ‘sacramental’ ceremony in the sense that Christians understand Baptism as sacramental). Therefore, Protestants tend to see any ‘baptisms’ performed prior to the coming of personal faith as irrelevant. If one solicits re-baptism, it is often because one wishes to be baptised according to the form actually practiced in the New Testament. (Most scholars–Catholic and otherwise–agree there are absolutely no clear examples of Baptism via any other form except immersion, though a few passages ‘permit the possibility’ of another form–the baptism of the jailer and his family in Acts 16:16-34 being an example).

Or, the baptism received as an infant might be accepted alongside one’s mature acceptance of Christ as evidence of one’s salvation. Baptism is sometimes downplayed in importance in some Protestant churches–often, folks go for many years having made ONLY a profession of faith in Christ as Savior. They might serve for years as deacons or elders and never get baptised. Or, if they received baptism via pouring or sprinkling as an infant, this would be accepted, though both the church and the individual count their date of salvation from the time they made their public profession of faith in Christ. So there really isn’t so much emphasis upon ‘rebaptism’ as MrS seems to think.

When I was a Lutheran, we simply looked up the nearest LCMS church, found out when their service was, and went.

When on vacation I look for:

a) Lutheran churches (ususally around), if none, then

b) Episcopal, if none

c) Catholic

IF I can’t find one of these, I’ll consider Reformed / Presbyterian/ Methodist, otherwise I’ll just do devotions on my own.

Actually, Protesant have a lot more “flex” than Catholics, officially.

Spokenword,

You wrote: “I would probably go to the same church Jesus went to. Where was that now?”

That would be a Jewish synagogue.

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