Where do we go when we die?

If we aren’t judged until the end of days, do we go to some “half-way” point like Sheol before the time comes, or do we go to Heaven, Hell, or Purgatory first, then come back to be judged, and then return?

The particular judgment happens the moment we die. We go to Purgatory, Heaven, or Hell.

You are are thinking of the general judgment, which is a different thing entirely.

These two topics can be found in the Catechism.

We are judged when we die (particular judgment), and we are judged at the end of the world, when our spirit will be reunited with our body. (general judgment) The same judgment will be given, and more explanation is given in the catechism.

1035 The teaching of the Church affirms the existence of hell and its eternity. Immediately after death the souls of those who die in a state of mortal sin descend into hell, where they suffer the punishments of hell, "eternal fire."615 The chief punishment of hell is eternal separation from God, in whom alone man can possess the life and happiness for which he was created and for which he longs.

Is there a particular judgement for people who are going to hell? The catechism doesn’t seem to say so. By particular judgement i assume it means a face-to-face encounter with Christ the judge.

Jesus openned the gates of heaven when he made the supreme sacrifice for us and the power of judgement was given over to him. He became the judge of all mankind on the day of his sacrifice. So as others here say we are judged on the day of our death before Christ our Lord.

I second the answers above. Another way of thinking about it is summed up by Dr. Peter Kreeft in Jesus Shock:
*
“If your life is Christ, then your death will be only more of Christ, forever. If your life is only Christlessness, then your death will be only more Christlessness, forever. That’s not fundamentalism, that’s the law of non-contradiction.” *

We eventually will be united with our bodies (we won’t be fully ourselves while disembodied) and we will be with (or without) Christ forever in the New Heavens and the New Earth.

Like so many other verses in the bible, how do we know these verses talking about and describing Hell, are not symbolic or metaphoric? Seems like alot of questions that are asked on here regarding the bible verses, get answered by an alternative interpretation of the verse, usually claiming the verse is symbolic of something else or a metaphor, we all know the bible authors used these methods when writing the verses, so I think maybe some of these descriptions of hell and what happens are probably symbolic or metaphors.

However if they are literal, is it possible some other verses that many think are symbolic or metaphoric, may actually be literal? I guess it comes down to what a persons interpretation of the verses and what they think is true. I dont know how its possible for someone to say that one verse is definitely symbolic/ metaphoric, and then at the same time, say others are definitely literal, and vice versa…?? I have a problem with that kind of logic, as using that, a person could interpret the verses to mean a number of things. LOL

Im not saying this is true, but its a possibility I think.

The descriptions of Hell as involving unquenchable fire and undying worms and all that are most likely metaphorical, especially when they refer to Hell before the General Judgment (since all of its inhabitants will then be disembodied souls and therefore physical threats like fire are not really meaningful to them).

However if they are literal, is it possible some other verses that many think are symbolic or metaphoric, may actually be literal? I guess it comes down to what a persons interpretation of the verses and what they think is true. I dont know how its possible for someone to say that one verse is definitely symbolic/ metaphoric, and then at the same time, say others are definitely literal, and vice versa…?? I have a problem with that kind of logic, as using that, a person could interpret the verses to mean a number of things. LOL

Im not saying this is true, but its a possibility I think.

Obviously one wouldn’t want to classify passages as literal or figurative arbitrarily, but I don’t think that’s how most Christians (or the Church itself) approach the matter. We are supposed to use what we know of literary genres and figures of speech, along with the guidance of the Tradition and Scripture scholars both ancient and modern, to make such determinations.

Usagi

That’s fashionable these days, but I’d be hesitant to chalk it all up to metaphor. Have you read about St Faustina’s vision of hell? If not, check this article out

Yes,but this was from ONE person, and since he was more than likely thinking alot about religion and the bible in his daily life, it is not so much of a stretch to think he may have had a very realistic dream about what he thought hell was like…Ive had bad dreams myself about hell, but that does not mean they are correct and that is what hell is like, more than likely, its due to my brain creating it from past images and theories.

I tend to think if God had wanted to give someone a true vision of Hell, it would have been more realistic than just a ‘vision’ or dream like.

First, St Faustina is a woman, not a man. Second, I could multiply examples nearly endlessly from the saints who teach that Hell is indeed filled with “spiritual fire”. Third, Jesus Himself (who clearly knew) describes Hell in such terms.

Most of us , hopefully, to Purgatory.

ICXC NIKA

I agree and Hope.

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