Which creed titles?


#1

What are all the other titles that The Nicene Creed is known as?


#2

The Nicene Creed itself from the year 325 is also called the Apostles Creed.
That’s the “shorter” one.
Sometimes:
The Baptismal Creed.
The Profession of Faith
The Nicene Symbol
The Symbol of Faith
The Nicene formula (used more as an adjective phrase than a proper noun)

However, if you mean the longer version:
What we often call the “Nicene Creed” is more accurately,
The Creed of Constantinople (year 381)
aka
The Nicene-Constanipolitan Creed. How’s that for a mouthful!


#3

That is incorrect. The Apostles’ Creed predates the Council of Nicaea.


#4

Right. I typed too quickly. I was too worried about making the point that what we use today (and call “the Nicene”) is actually from Nicaea and Constantinople.

The actual, proper “Nicene” Creed is not the Apostles Creed.

To set the record straight, here’s the text of the actual Creed from the Council of Nicaea, 325.

We believe in one God, the Father almighty, maker of all things, visible and invisible;
And in one Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of God, begotten from the Father, only-begotten, that is, from the essence of the Father, God from God, light from light, true God from true God, begotten not made, of one essence with the Father, through Whom all things came into being, things in heaven and things on earth, Who because of us men and because of our salvation came down and became incarnate, becoming man, suffered and rose again on the third day, ascended to the heavens, and will come again to judge the living and the dead;
And in the Holy Spirit.

Yes, it ends there.


#5

Is the concluding anathema strictly part of the Creed as well?

And whosoever shall say that there was a time when the Son of God was not , or that before he was begotten he was not, or that he was made of things that were not, or that he is of a different substance or essence or that he is a creature, or subject to change or conversion—all that so say, the Catholic and Apostolic Church anathematizes them.


#6

I’m not exactly sure. Different sources either include or omit it.

The point about “it ends there” was to contrast it with the Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed that we use now at Mass, and to explain that I did not “clip” the text for brevity’s sake.


#7

Please clarify the titles of The Nicene Creed.


#8

The point is: which Nicene Creed?

The one from Nicea in 325?..

Or the better known one (the one from Mass) that is actually the Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed from 381? even though that’s often called the Nicene Creed.

We’ve listed a number of titles already.

What kind of clarification do you need exactly?


#9

Rubrics from the Roman Missal:

“18. At the end of the Homily, the Symbol or Profession of Faith or Creed, when prescribed, is either sung or said:
I believe in one God, …”

  1. Instead of the Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed, especially during Lent and Easter Time, the baptismal Symbol of the Roman Church, known as the Apostles’ Creed, may be used.
    I believe in God, …".

From The Roman Missal, published by Catholic Truth Society, © 2010 ICEL, ISBN 9781860827303, pages 560 and 563.


#10

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