White teacher suspended after wearing Michael Jordan costume


#1

sfgate.com/local/article/White-teacher-suspended-after-wearing-Michael-10597038.php


#2

:confused:


#3

… but… he explicitly said he was doing it to honor Michael Jordan… seriously, wtf.


#4

That’s unfortunate that he will need to undergo an investigation over a Halloween costume! Especially when he had good intentions.


#5

If he had done “blackface” then I get it. But he was wearing a mask, which is a much different thing. :shrug:


#6

Yeah, dressing up in black face, or even black mask/gloves as this teacher did, is generally not a bright idea if you’re white. Particularly at work. While I believe his intention to honor Jordan was genuine, seeing the result including that mask, I can see how it could be taken as offensive. At the very least it was a very bad idea.


#7

Why should being “offensive” be justification for being suspended from your job?


#8

I guess he should have dressed up as a priest.


#9

Because no one else should be obligated to accept being offended at work?


#10

Anti Christian prejudice is the last acceptable prejudice.

On the sunny side, at least there are fewer acceptable prejudices, but, as longs as prejudice of any kind is acceptable no none is safe from it.


#11

The issue with that is that what’s offensive is completely subjective, and something as sever as a suspension shouldn’t be based on someone else’s subjective interpretation of a situation.


#12

True, but racial and sexual insensitivity are pretty clearly outlined as being lines you don’t cross. This clearly crossed it as a general rule white folks aren’t supposed to dress up in blackface (and that mask was the equivalent of blackface whether he accepts that or not).


#13

You know, this would be a much better world if people didn’t take offense where none was intended.

I thought the whole goal is valuing diversity, appreciate not just ones’ own background and culture but that of others as well.

Somebody admires someone from another race enough to dress up as them and folks first reaction to be offended as opposed to appreciating that someone from one race can appreciate those of another is wrong.

It twists the goal from diversity to division.


#14

The teacher was doing it to show his respect for a great athlete, and to share that athlete’s accomplishments with his students. How the frick does the inclusion of a mask (a mass-produced, readily available to anyone who decides to purchase one, mask) somehow make that show of admiration offensive?

People need to get over themselves and stop being so sensitive.


#15

Simple, white man, black mask. It’s a pretty clear cut case of, “don’t do it.”


#16

Yeah, and don’t dare wear the jersey of an athlete you admire if he doesn’t happen to be the same race as you.

And everyone involved in the play ‘Hamilton’ should be flayed for portraying characters that are a different race than themselves.

We must celebrate and emphasize divisiveness…


#17

There are certain pet political issues which come with a hair-trigger for causing offense in the sheeple—and we can thank the left for at once fighting against objective morality while sanitizing the world in accordance with their arbitrary ethics.


#18

The jersey wasn’t the problem. Nor would that be considered offensive by anyone.

And if you can’t differentiate between white folks portraying minorities versus minorities portraying white folks I can’t help you. But there’s a clear difference that stems from our white supremacist/dominant past as a society.


#19

So-- you endorse double standards and intent is irrelevant to you?

Did you explain this to any children who came to your door stop on Halloween? I tended to admire the fact that many kids chose to dress as folks that were different than them…


#20

White people aren’t allowed to dress up like black folks because the US once engaged in ______, which leftists who don’t believe in objective morality claim is something objectively immoral.

Mhm.


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.